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MODUL GALLEY AND HOUSEKEEPING CLEANER FOR CRUISE SHIP JOB 2020 2 BLK LOTIM (1)

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PROGRAM
PELATIHAN KAPAL PESIAR
GALLEY & HOUSEKEEPING CLEANER / UTILITY / STEWARD
KODE PROGRAM PELATIHAN: I.0000000.01.20
KEMENTERIAN KETENAGAKERJAAN R.I.
DIREKTORAT JENDERAL PEMBINAAN PELATIHAN DAN PRODUKTIVITAS
BALAI LATIHAN KERJA LOMBOK TIMUR
Jalan Ramban Biak Desa Lenek Daya, Kecamatan Aikmel, Lombok Timur NTB
2020
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CONTENT
HOSPITALITY SECTOR: CRUISES VS HOTELS (PROS AND CONS)………………………………………………….
DEPARTEMENT ON CRUISE SHIP ……………………………………………………………………………………………….
10 USPH KEYS MUST COMPLY FOR GALLEY TEAM ……………………………………………………………………..
OPP (OUTBREAK PREVENTION PLAN) ……………………………………………………………………………………….
FOOD AND BEVERAGE DEPARTMENT ……………………………………………………………………………………….
1. GALLEY UTILITY / CLEANER / STEWARD ………………………………………………………………………………..
2 CLEAN AND MAINTAIN KITCHEN EQUIPMENT AND UTENSILS .................................................
3 PERFORM BASIC MAINTENANCE ON KITCHEN EQUIPMENT, UTENSILS AND PREMISES ………….
4 HANDLE WASTE AND LAUNDRY REQUIREMENTS ………………………………………………………………….
HOUSEKEEPING DEPARTMENT …………………………………………………………………………………………………
GENERAL PUBLIC CLEANER AND CABIN STEWARD ……………………………………………………………………
1 RECEIVE HOUSEKEEPING REQUESTS ………………………………………………………………………………………
2 SERVICE HOUSEKEEPING REQUESTS ………………………………………………………………………………………
3 PROVIDE ADVICE TO GUESTS …………………………………………………………………………………………………
4 LIAISE WITH OTHER DEPARTMENTS ……………………………………………………………………………………….
PUBLIC AREA CLEANING .............................................................................................................
CLEAN AND PREPARE ROOMS FOR INCOMING GUESTS ……………………………………………………………
FUNDAMENTAL ENGLISH ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….
CRUISE SHIP GLOSSARY …………………………………………………………………………………………………………….
CRUISE SHIP ONBOARDING OVERVIEW …………………………………………………………………………………….
HOW TO APPLY FOR CLEANER OR GALLEY UTILITY POSITION …………………………………………………….
BASIC SAFETY TRAINING …………………………………………………………………………………………………………..
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HOSPITALITY SECTOR: CRUISES VS HOTELS (PROS AND CONS)
Hospitality, travel industry, and hotel industry are all branches that are intertwined, and they make up
one of the largest service industries, which is bound to become even more important in the future. The
aim of the travel industry is to tend to the needs of people traveling away from their residences. Even
though cruise ships are being classified as means of transportation, they are a type of accommodation,
as well. Hotels are closely linked with the travel industry since they provide accommodation to travelers
who visit different locations and need somewhere to stay overnight. Rather than tending to their basic
needs, the hospitality industry is more concerned with providing the customers with enjoyment and
experience, and in general, should be perceived as a section of the service industry, with its focus not on
end-products and necessities, but on leisure and customer satisfaction. Let's dive into a detailed
comparison of the two types of accommodation, namely cruise ships and hotels, by establishing the
similarities and differences between the two, as well as highlighting the upsides and drawbacks of each.
Cruises - pros
One of the advantages of cruise lines is reflected in the emphasis that is put on customer interaction,
with end-to-end experience being placed high up on the priority list. What's more, making a personal
connection with the customers helps build trust, and giving priority to the guests' well-being is crucial
for successful customer interaction. Another advantage of cruise ships is the fact that they provide the
guests with entertainment along the way - most cruise ships offer various activities that give the guests
a sense of achievement, turning the once experiential travel into a goal-oriented adventure. With new
trends constantly emerging in the hospitality sector, one of the most notable ones is definitely the more
conscious approach to traveling. The eco-conscientiousness of the cruise industry is higher than ever,
and it's helping reduce the environmental footprint of cruise travel as well as preserve the heritage of
local communities. Another notable trend in the cruise industry is an increased interest in quality cruise
travel insurance. Namely, more and more travelers are looking for travel insurance plans that offer
travel medical coverage to protect themselves from a variety of unexpected circumstances, which will
provide them with great value and carefree travel.
Cruises - cons
One of the issues that the cruise lines need to work on is the internet access. However, with an
increased number of digital nomads on board, cruise ships are bound to deal with the problem soon
enough. Another problem with cruise lines is that the check-in takes long, and it can take hours to get
every passenger on board. However, there is a solution for that - opting for a smaller cruise ship. Last
but not least, staying on a cruise ship comes with limited control, and the time spent in port isn't nearly
enough as many travelers would like it to be. One way that passengers may get around these is to find
itineraries where an overnight stay is included - that way, they can spend more time exploring the
location, as well as experience nightlife there.
Hotels - pros
First off, let's start with the most obvious advantages. Some people are simply prone to motion sickness.
However, there is no sea sickness involved when staying at a hotel, and although some people find their
sea legs after one or two days, others don't, and that's exactly why some people would choose a hotel
over a cruise ship any day. When you're going on a vacation, the hotel is basically a home away from
home. The guests are provided with security, comfort, as well as some form of entertainment and Wi-Fi
to stay connected with friends and family. Hotels have consistent quality, so whichever hotel you visit
that is from the hotel chain you've visited, you already know what to expect. There is this notable global
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trend in the hospitality industry which is based on introducing new technology as a source of
opportunities for an advantage over the competitors. That implies that IT shouldn't be seen as a
commodity but rather as a strategy for attracting potential customers.
Hotels - cons
One of the main drawbacks when it comes to hotels is that more often than not, they disregard the
benefits that come with loyalty programs. It's important to focus on the value and provide your
customers with deals where they can save more money. Once they realize that you are both on the
same side and how much you value their money, they're more likely to recommend the brand, as well as
come back for more, which should be the ultimate goal of the hotel industry - attracting new and
keeping old customers. Another area of the hotel industry that has room for improvement is the
customer interaction. There is something about welcome notes, informational pamphlets, and even
towel animals left on the bed that makes guests instantly feel welcome, which makes their stay even
more pleasant. By stretching the budget and investing some more money in creating a more positive
experience for the guests, the hotel industry could really thrive.
After comparing these two industries, we can conclude that both of them offer different benefits in
order to accommodate a wide range of their customers' needs. This list can serve as a guide for deciding
on the best type of accommodation for holidays.
DEPARTEMENT ON CRUISE SHIP
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FOOD AND BEVERAGE DEPARTMENT
GALLEY UTILITY
JOB DESCRIPTION
KEY ACCOUNTABILITIES
• Major target is to keep the galley clean. He is responsible for his immediate working area and/or
as the Executive Chef delegates.
REPORTS TO
• All Utility Men working in the Galley report directly to the First Cook. The entire kitchen staff
including the Utility/Cleaner is subordinate to the Executive Chef and ultimately to the Hotel
Manager
SUBORDINATE PERSONNEL
• None
AREAS OF RESPONSIBILITY
• He washes properly all china, silver and glassware and cleans all pots, pans and equipment, etc.,
as well as the general cleaning of galley. He cleans fruit, vegetables, potatoes, etc.
• He assists Cooks with breakfast, lunch and dinner service to ensure an efficient Food Service for
pax and crew.
• He assists Cooks in all tasks to ensure an efficient breakfast, lunch and dinner service.
• He washes and cleans all pots, pans and equipment, etc.
• He cleans and sanitizes the whole galley, fridge, freezer, including floors, walls, steps leading
below and elevator according the USPH standard.
• He cleans all vegetables, potatoes, etc. and/or as delegated by the Executive Chef.
• He assists in taking food and utensils needed for breakfast, lunch and dinner service to the
respective service area.
• He assists in all work as delegated by the Executive Chef.
• He is aware of all fire, safety and emergency procedures.
• He takes part in storage of food when required
• He takes part in luggage handling when required.
• He performs other duties if necessary, since above stated describe only a regular working day.
• He assists in loading and unloading during the storage of food, beverages, consumables etc.
• He is available to work overtime if requested.
CLEANING AND MAINTENANCE
• He is responsible for the proper cleaning and sanitary matters of his working area and/or as
delegated by the Chef.
• He handles all working material and equipment with the necessary care and keeps it well
cleaned.
• He reports all necessary repairs to his Superior.
• He is familiar with proper sanitation procedures and follows U.S. Public Health requirements.
DAILY ROUTINES FOR UTILITY/CLEANER – GALLEY
Morning
• Washes pots, pans, utensils and equipment
• Cleans vegetables, potatoes and salads as required by Cooks
• Assists Cooks as required
• Washes pots, pans, utensils and equipment
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•
•
•
Assists Cooks as required
Assists service staff in returning luncheon items
Washes, rinses and sanitizes whole galley after lunch including floor
Evening
• Washes pots, pans, utensils and equipment
• Assists Cooks as needed
• Checks all fridges, freezers and stores
• Cleans and arranges them
• Washes, rinses and sanitizes whole galley after dinner including floor
FOLLOWING DUTIES TO BE FOLLOWED ACCORDING TO EXECUTIVE/CHEF
• General cleaning
• Cleans out all fridges, freezers and storeroom, then washes, rinses and sanitizes them
APPEARANCE/PERSONAL HYGIENE
• The appearance of the entire personnel on board the ship reflects the reputation and image of
the Company; therefore a great deal of emphasis is placed on a professional appearance.
www.mycruiseship.info Page 4/4
• The Company expects you to maintain the highest standard of personal appearance and hygiene
at all times.
• If in passenger areas full uniform is to be worn: hat, scarf, jacket, name tag, pants and proper
shoes.
• Have a clean neat personal appearance.
• Special attention to grooming, hygiene care and clean and proper uniforms and shoes.
• Hair must be well groomed, neat and not extend over the shirt collar and always be kept clean.
• A moustache is acceptable if kept neatly trimmed.
• Big earrings and big necklaces are not to be worn on duty and more than one moderate size ring
is not acceptable.
• Smoking is not permitted while on duty.
 Assistant Waiter
You will work with other Waiters to serve meals and take care of our diners. You will set up tables, take
orders, serve food and drinks, and clean tables. You must also become familiar with menu descriptions
and wine lists, and work in various food and beverage areas. If you have great customer service skills,
experience in a similar role, we’d like you to sail with us!
 Restaurant Host/ess
The Restaurant Services team works hard to achieve the highest level of guest satisfaction in terms of
food presentation and service execution. Composed of Assistant Waiters, Waiters, Cafe Attendants,
Mess Attendants, Room Service Attendants, Restaurant Host/ess, and Snack Attendants, members of
the Restaurant Services department are in charge of cleaning and setting up tables, explaining menus,
preparing food stations, taking orders, serving food and beverages, and performing other tasks in all
restaurant venues around the ship while acting in a courteous, friendly, and professional manner.
Previous restaurant service experience is required to join this team.
 Waiter
Waiters set up tables, explain menus, take orders, serve food and beverages, and clean tables in their
assigned areas. He/she must know menu items and ingredients to be able to promote the items being
served and answer guests’ questions. Waiters are fully responsible for ensuring the satisfaction of guests
in their stations. He/she also coordinates service with his/her Assistant Waiter according to service
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procedures. Candidates must have experience in a related position in an upscale hotel, resort, or cruise
ship, as well as Food & Beverage training certificates.
 Bar Utility
Work behind the scenes to make sure that guests enjoy their visit to our bars. As a Bar Utility, you will
support bar operations by assisting bartenders, keeping bar areas clean, and ensuring that your work
area is well stocked with beverages, ice, glassware, and other supplies. We prefer candidates with
similar experience in an upscale cruise ship, lounge, or restaurant.
 Galley Steward
A Galley Steward cleans all food preparation areas and equipment according to USPH regulations and
the company’s environmental program. You will also transfer supplies and equipment between storage
and work areas; load/unload supplies in the provision room; assist in food-related pre-preparation tasks;
and perform other tasks as needed. If you have kitchen steward experience, preferably in an upscale
restaurant, hotel, cruise ship, or high-volume food service facility, then we’d like you to join us at sea!
JOB DESCRIPTION – GALLEY STEWARD
JOB SUMMARY The Galley Utility is a very physically demanding position primarily responsible for the
maintenance and upkeep of the dish station in the galley. He/she will be washing all pots, pans,
silverware, service items, and glassware for each meal served on board (breakfast, lunch and dinner).
The Galley Utility will be required to keep their work station clean and sanitary. The Galley Utility will
also assist with general galley cleaning projects and basic food prep as assigned by the Chef or Hotel
Manager.
ESSENTIAL DUTIES
Dishwashing: Properly wash, rinse, soak, wash and sanitize each type of plate, silverware, pot, pan,
utensil, and glassware using a commercial dishwashing machine.
Galley sanitation: Assist with cleaning the galley after every meal. Assist in maintaining proper food
handling and storage procedures in accordance with CDC/FDA guidelines. Assist with trash removal and
disposal.
Guest Interaction: Interact with guests in a friendly and courteous manner at all times. Escort guests to
stateroom at start of cruise and assist in the handling of luggage. Participate in evening activities and in
galley tour as directed by Chef or Hotel Manager.
May be asked to participate in the cooking, preparation, or plate-up of food items as a member of the
galley team.
Glossary
Term
Bleach
Cleaning cloth
Cleaning equipment
Cleaning Schedule
Cleaning utensils
Explanation
Sodium hypochlorite used in diluted solution in water is used to
sanitise and clean kitchen areas and surfaces
Cloth that is used just for cleaning. Not to be used for food
production
Any piece of equipment designed for the specific use of cleaning
including vacuum cleaners, mops etc.
A plan to schedule cleaning of all equipment and utensils within
the premises used to produce food. Also states when to clean the
building and surrounds where the food production is carried out
Small pieces of equipment, like brooms, scourers, scrubbing
brushes, mops, buckets
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Detergent
Kitchen Equipment
Kitchen utensils
Legislation
MSDS
Production area
Personal Protection
Equipment (PPE)
Sanitise
Storage area
Waste disposal
Audit
CAR
Cleaning schedule
Enterprise
FIFO
FSP
Food Safety Officer
HACCP
High risk food
Out-of-control situation
PPE
Pathogen
Potentially hazardous foods
SOP
Snood
Temperature Danger Zone
WI
Working dirt
Back-of-house
Specific liquids, sprays, powders etc. used in the process of
cleaning
Large equipment used to cook food like stoves, coolrooms,
normally fixed in place
Small utensils used in the kitchen for food production, spoons,
knives, ladles
Pieces of law or regulations
Material Safety Data Sheet
Where food is processed for human consumption
Personal Protection Equipment
Gloves, face masks, eye protection, aprons, hats: clothing or
apparel that protects person from harm while using harsh
chemicals
To make clean, remove bacteria to safe level
Where food is stored prior to processing and after processing
Removal of rubbish from food production area
Inspection of workplace to identify unsafe food practices or
situations
Corrective Action Report
List identifying food preparation equipment items and areas to
be cleaned, when they are to be cleaned and the names of staff
responsible for cleaning them
Relates to an organisation, business or place of operation
First In, First Out stock rotation
Food safety plan
Person in charge of food safety at the venue
Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points
Potentially hazardous foods especially for ready to eat food
A situation where the safety of food has been compromised
because one or more controls have been breached or exceeded
Personal protective equipment
A disease-causing harmful micro-organism
High risk food: foods which need to be kept under temperature
controlled conditions in order to preserve their food safety
Standard Operating Procedure
Covering for a beard
5˚C – 60/63˚C: range within which bacteria multiplies most
rapidly
Work Instruction
Dirt generated by recent, normal work activity and procedures
(as distinct to built-up dirt accumulated over a period of time)
Areas of the property where guests are not allowed
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Black List
Burnisher
Busboy/busgirl
Clean
Degreaser
Deodorant
Dessert gear
Detergent
Disinfectant
Draught beer
F&B
FIFO
Front-of-house
Gaming
Gueridon equipment
Interpersonal skills
MICE
Micro-organisms
POS
Post-mix
QSR
Runner
Sanitiser
Single-use items
Spot cleaning
A list of patrons/guests the venue does not want on the premises,
or who they have banned: a venue will not house/serve a person
on this list
Polishing machine used to polish (or ‘buff’) hard floor surfaces
Person who assists waiters by fetching and carrying items
Free from visible contamination and odour
Chemical agent used to cut through/remove grease
Chemical used to mask/cover bad smells/odours
Dessert spoon and fork
Chemical (liquid or powder) used to remove dirt from surfaces:
available in different types and concentrations
Chemical used to kill bacteria/micro-organisms
Bulk beer; beer ‘on tap’
Food and beverage
First In, First Out stock rotation
Areas of the property where staff and guests have face-to-face
contact
Gambling
Items used to prepare, cook and serve food at table
Skills used when dealing with people/patrons (such as
communication, conflict resolution, rapport building,
negotiations)
Meetings, Incentives, Conferences and Exhibitions
Germs such as bacteria and mould
Point of Sale
Bulk aerated waters
Quick Service Restaurant: term used to describe take-away food
outlets
Busboy/busgirl
Chemical used to reduce bacteria to a safe level
Food and beverage items intended to be used once only and then
discarded. They should not be cleaned and re-used. Examples
include drinking straws, take-away food and drink containers and
cutlery
Cleaning of one ‘spot’ rather than the whole area/item
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10 USPH KEYS must comply for Galley Team:
The following rules apply to all Cruise Ship in all Cruise areas. They comply with the 2000 USPHS
Operations Manual, and all European sanitation protocols.
1. HANDLE FOOD & BEVERAGE HYGIENICALLY
a. Wear plastic disposable gloves when handling any cooked or ‘ready to eat’ food.
b. Always wear a clean hat and clean uniform when in a food handling area.
c. Never smoke in or near a food or beverage handling or dispensing area.
d. Never eat or drink in food or beverage handling or dispensing area.
2. ALWAYS USE THE 3-BUCKET SYSTEM FOR CLEANING
a. WASH – with soap and water in the RED bucket with water as hot as your hands can tolerate
b. RINSE – with warm clear water in the GREY bucket.
c. SANITIZE – with chlorine in cool water in the WHITE bucket (100ppm = 1 cap of chlorine/bucket
– use test strips)
d. NEVER use WASH-RINSE-SANITIZE buckets for any other purpose.
3. ALWAYS CHECK AND MAINTAIN CORRECT FOOD TEMPERATURES
a. ALWAYS use a hygienically clean food thermometer –use alcohol wipes to clean thermometers.
b. NO food (cooked or raw) may be served or used at more than 5°C (41°F) or no less than 65°C
(149°F)
c. Fish, meat, soups, vegetables, pasta, sauces and sausages must be at least 75°C (165°F)
d. Hot chicken, ham, eggs (scrambled, omelets, fried etc) must never be less than 74°C (165°F)
e. Pork must never be served at less than 71°C (160°F)
f. Refrigerator temperatures must ALWAYS be at 4°C (40°F) or lower.
4. STORAGE OF FOOD IN REFRIGERATORS
a. Cooked and raw food must be kept in either in separate refrigerators on in Safe Storage order
(See SP23.10)
b. If there is one refrigerators, cooked food must be stored on the upper shelves. Raw food on
lower shelves.
c. EVERY container of food in refrigerators must be covered in airtight plastic containers or plastic
covering.
5. SEPARATION
a. Clean dishes, utensils, silverware etc, must NEVER be in the same place as dirty ones.
b. Always separate.
6. LABELLING
a. ALL cleaning chemicals must be clearly labeled and color or number coded.
b. EVERY container in EVERY refrigerator and other storage area must be clearly labeled with
contents, date and time placed and expiry date seven days from the day it was placed into the
refrigerator or other storage area.
7. TRANSPORTING FOOD BETWEEN GALLEY AND SERVING OR PRESENTATION AREAS
a. ALL food that is being transported MUST be covered.
b. Food and beverages must NEVER be transported in elevators or areas designated to transport
garbage.
c. Food must NEVER leave the provision area or presented in containers made of cardboard or
wood.
d. Food containers must ALWAYS be at least 15cm (6 inches) off the deck or floor.
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8. PERSONAL HYGIENE – WASH HANDS ALWAYS FOR 20 SECONDS
a. Wash hands EVERY time you enter or leave a food or beverage preparation area.
b. Wash hands after touching dirty dishes and before handling clean ones.
c. NEVER use a hand-wash sink for any other purpose.
d. ALWAYS keep plenty of disposable towels and hand soap in food and beverage handling areas.
Always dispose of paper towels properly in the designated paper towel waste bin.
e. AVOID coughing or sneezing in food preparation areas. If this happens, leave the area and wash
your hands.
f. NEVER touch your face or hair or any exposed part of your body in food or beverage handling
areas. If you must, leave the area and wash your hands before returning.
9. NO ILLEGAL OR DANGEROUS PRACTISES
a. NEVER take any utensils, plates, glasses, equipment or food to your cabin.
b. NEVER store any equipment in an area used for something different.
c. NEVER store toxic material (like brass or silver cleaner, insecticide, air fresheners) with other
cleaning products.
10. CLEANING CLOTHS – ONLY USE THE CORRECT ONES
a. NEVER use towels, dishcloths, or any non-designated cloths for cleaning or polishing surfaces.
b. Only use clean cotton cloths to Rinse and Sanitize. Sponge may be used for washing.
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OPP (Outbreak Prevention Plan)
1. United States Coast Guard (USCG) oversees the cruise industry to ensure the safety of
passengers aboard US. flagged ships or foreign ships operating out of American ports.
2. Every 3 months U.S. Coast Guard attends guest and crew drills.
3. All crew must know the ECC # (Evacuation Control Centre)
4. All crew must know how to read a guest SeaPass card
5. All crew must know their emergency duties
Environment - Save the Waves is the company's commitment to the environment. The program
encourages recycling and instructs guests and crew to help keep the oceans clean by not throwing
anything overboard.
The focus is on minimization, separation, and recycling of waste. Waste on the ship is sorted, recycled,
incinerated, and disposed of properly.
There are four key principles of Save The Waves:
1. Reduce, Reuse, Recycle - Reduce the generation of material waste, reuse and recycle wherever
possible, and properly dispose of remaining wastes.
2. Practice Pollution Prevention - Nothing may be thrown overboard. Nothing.
3. Go Above and Beyond Compliance (ABC) - means doing more than is required by regulations.
4. Continuous Improvement - Change is the only constant; innovation is rewarded and rewarded.
Garbage Handling and Disposal There are different color bins for garbage separation
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RED bin for paper & plastic
YELLOW bin for wet food waste
GRAY bin for glass
BLUE bin for metal cans
WHITE bin for china & porcelain
OPP = Outbreak Prevention Plan
The possible symptoms associated with Norovirus are:
 Vomiting
 Diarrhea
 Abdominal Cramps and
 Headaches
Onboard our ships we have 3 levels within
OPP: OPP LEVEL 1:
is defined as the routine activities or Standard Operating Procedures (SOP's) occurrence of and
outbreak. During OPP Level 1, Virox is used for CLEAN surfaces and Oxivir Five 16 is used for SANITIZE
surfaces - these chemicals must be used at least twice per day for sanitation of all frequently touched
surfaces.
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Frequently touched surfaces are:
1. Handrails
2. Elevator buttons
3. Counter tops
4. Telephones etc.
Note: For the most frequently touched surfaces (touched more often than once every 5 minutes) the
chemical PURE may be used as it can effectively sanitize in just 1 minute of contact time.
OPP LEVEL 2: Intensifies the overall sanitizing effort and incorporates more extreme measures and a
higher frequency of sanitizing. Level 2 will be activated when:
G.I. cases are in excess of 0.5% of the guests onboard (1.0% for cruises longer than 7 days).
G.I. cases are in excess of 1.0% of the crew onboard, * 6 in 6 "six GI cases in six hours. op m Notification
is received from the corporate office. A decision is made by the Captain.
OPP LEVEL 3: is a highly demanding situation which requires 100% commitment and cooperation from
each and every one of the vessel's officers, staff and crew regardless of their normal duties The ship is to
discontinue all seif-service food in all guest and crew locations Level 3 will be activated when : GI cases
are in excess of 1.5% of the guest or crew population onboard VIROX REMAINS the Cleaner f choice
Precautions Sanitizer ot choice How do you prevent contracting Norovirus? The best way to prevent
getting ill is to always wash your hsnds thoroughly with soạp and hot water after restroom breaks and
again before eating REMEMBER: Norovirus is "ingested"; for example, eating a bread roll after handling
it with your infected hands DO NOT REMOVE FOOD FROM THE MESS
SANITIZATION
 The key to minimizing the spread of Norovirus is to frequently sanitize ALL frequently touched
surfaces.
 A frequently touched surface would include door handles, elevator buttons, countertops,
handrails, telephones etc.
 It is extremely important that the surface be allowed to air dry following the application of the
sanitizing agent.
 Sanitation solutions must be applied with a saturated (almost dripping wet) microfiber rag and
evenly distributed on the surfaces being sanitized.
 The surface must be allowed to air dry and must remain wet / moist for a minimum of 5 minutes
in order to effectively eliminate Norovirus.
 After 5 minutes the surface may be polished. Oxyvir Five 16 and PURE may not be used in food
preparation or storage areas These areas are sanitized with a chlorine solution.
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1. GALLEY UTILITY OR CLEANER DUTIES
1: Clean kitchen premises
1.1
Identify the areas that may require cleaning in a kitchen premises environment and the
frequency of cleaning for each identified area
Introduction
Cleanliness in the kitchen environment is imperative.
When the public enter restaurants it is the cleanliness that is first
noted. Places the public cannot see are just as important as the
places that can be seen.
Modern practice is all based around the Food Safety Plan (FSP). No
food premises should operate without have a FSP.
In your FSP will be a Cleaning Schedule.
The cleaning schedule will determine:
 When EVERYTHING is to be cleaned
 How it is to be clean
 Who is to clean
 How often everything will be cleaned
 What chemicals and equipment are to be used when cleaning
 Advice on OH&S equipment to be used when using cleaning
chemicals.
What areas in the kitchen might need to be cleaned?
 Floor of the kitchen
 Workbenches fixed and/or mobile
 Storerooms, shelving, floor, walls and ceilings:
 Dry store
 Cool room
 Freezer
 Chemical stores
 Sinks and food disposal units
 Drains, in floors, especially wet areas
 Exhaust fans and filters
 Air conditioning outlets
 Light covers
 Staff change rooms
 Garbage storage areas
 Stock receiving areas
 Grease traps
 Walls.
How many areas can you identify within your establishment that need to be cleaned?
 How often are they cleaned?
 Who cleans them?
 What do they use to clean them?
 Are any chemicals used to clean these areas?
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
What safety precautions need to be taken when using these chemicals?
How are these areas cleaned?
1.2 Select appropriate cleaning utensils and chemicals
Type of surfaces that may need to be cleaned
Given the wide variety of establishments that comprise the hospitality and tourism industries it is to be
expected that the range of different surfaces that may need to be cleaned is extremely diverse.
The types of kitchen surfaces that may have to be cleaned are:
Floors:
Walls and ceilings:
 Tiles
 Painted
 Concrete
 Tiles
 Vinyl
 Rubber
Fixtures and fittings:
 Stainless steel
 Plastic
 Ceramic
 Glass
Essentially, the surface to be cleaned and the nature of the cleaning to be done will determine what is to
be used: a spill of red wine on marble tiles will require a different approach (and equipment) from blood
on carpet, or broken glass on wood.
The best surface to use in the kitchen is ones that are impervious to liquids or water.
Selecting equipment
The type of cleaning equipment found in businesses will vary.
Some premises have just the basics – many establishments will have only ‘domestic’ cleaning equipment
(that is, suitable for homes) rather than commercial or industrial cleaning equipment.
Generally, commercial or industrial equipment is better because it is:
o Sturdier
o Larger capacity
o Fitted with larger electric motors (where applicable).
Other places boast an extensive range of the latest cleaning equipment with the
‘correct’ item for every cleaning job that needs doing.
The cleaning storeroom
Cleaning equipment is usually kept in a special dedicated storage area – this
may be a purpose-built cleaning storeroom where equipment, utensils, cleaning
chemicals and protective clothing is kept.
Alternatively, equipment may be kept in an assortment of cupboards or other
locations around the premises as space allows.
What equipment may be involved in cleaning?
The following gives a representative list of the cleaning equipment that the majority of properties will
use.
Specialist equipment will be used where special situations exist – for example, a property with a large
outside area may have a motorised cleaner that is not necessary in a small travel agency that only has
internal areas that require cleaning.
15
Mops
Mops are generally made from cotton or cotton/polyester blends.
The main types of mops are:
o Kitchen Washing mops: to wash floor surfaces or apply sealant to floors that have been
stripped and need to be re-sealed
o Outside kitchen mop: some dining areas may have tiled floors so you would not use the same
mop here as you would in the kitchen.
Brooms and brushes
Brooms and brushes can be made from a variety of materials, ranging from straw to a synthetic coarse
bristle-like material.
Their purpose is to remove dust, dirt and grime from surfaces.
They can come in all sizes and shapes, depending on the purpose they were designed for.
They should be sufficient in number and variety as required for the cleaning task or as dictated by the
establishment: they must be clean, and sufficiently bristled.
The most common types of brooms and brushes are:
o Scrubbing brush
o Sink brush
o Toilet brush.
Not all premises will require all types of brooms – it will depend on the facilities and areas to be cleaned.
A standard item is a dust pan and brush set for cleaning up small spills etc.
Cloths and sponges
Cloths and sponges are used to clean a variety of surfaces.
Sponges are used for damp cleaning needs and cloths are used for cleaning, polishing
and dusting:
o They can be made from a variety of materials, but are generally lintfree
o They are used with a cleaning agent
o Some cloths are made from material and some are disposable/paper-based.
Buckets
Buckets can come in a variety of shapes, sizes and styles and are generally made from either galvanised
steel or plastic.
Some buckets have wheels for ease of mobility: others only have a handle. Buckets are used to hold
water and cleaning agents:
o Mop buckets feature rollers to remove excess water from the mop head prior to use.
Cleaning equipment also normally includes some smaller plastic bucket-type containers used to hold
cleaning materials, cloths, and chemicals etc. which are and used to carry items around and into rooms.
Protective gloves
A good supply of disposable gloves should be available to every cleaner: specific
house requirements in relation to individual Occupational Health and Safety
(OHS) issues may require other, more substantial protective clothing (including
other types of gloves) to be worn:
o It is standard procedure in all premises that cleaning staff wear protective gloves when
cleaning or handling chemicals.
16
o
Your cleaning uniform is also regarded as ‘protective clothing’.
Protective face masks
Face masks will be necessary when using cleaning chemical on grill tops and oven cleaning procedures:
o When cleaning these types of equipment there should also be well ventilated such as
turn the extraction system in system on full power
o This will draw the fumes outside the work area and minimise the inhalation of fu
fumes.
Warning signs
These are safety signs used when a public area is being cleaned (to warn customers of the danger) or
when nominated back-of-house
house areas are being cleaned (to warn staff, delivery drivers, repair people
who are on the premises).
It may be standard procedures that they are displayed whenever cleaning duties are being undertaken,
regardless of location and regardless of the type of cleaning.
Garbage receptacles
Nearly all cleaning tasks will require you to gather and dispose of debris,
rubbish, waste etc so most cleaning tasks will necessitate the use of some
form of waste receptacle.
The ‘receptacle’ may be:
o A solid item –such
such as a bin
o A disposable plastic bag – usually heavy-duty
o A bin liner placed inside a garbage receptacle that is built-in
in to a cleaning trolley
o Any ‘bins’ need to be cleaned so as to maintain the ‘clean’ image that every business
wants to project – just because they are bins doesn’t allow you to let them get, or use
them when they are dirty.
Electrically-powered equipment
The majority of businesses use either industrial or commercial cleaning equipment, but the use of
domestic items is also common.
Industrial or commercial items have stronger motors, larger capacities, are more sturdily built.
Vacuum cleaners
Vacuum cleaners are available in wet or dry types. Dry vacuum cleaners can only be
used on dry surfaces and to suck up dry material and not liquids.
Wet vacuum cleaners are designed to suck up liquid spills and are ideal for cleaning
floors in kitchen and emergency clean up of spilt milk.
Double-check
check that the vacuum cleaner you intend using is designated as a ‘wet’
vacuum cleaner before using it on liquids: some vacuum cleaners are dual-purpose
dual
and can be used on wet or dry surfaces.
Scrubbing machines
Scrubbing
rubbing machines can be used to remove debris from hard surfaces (such as tiles, or
concrete), sealed floors, carpet and other areas such as escalators, entrance matting and travelators.
Manufacturers Instruction
All cleaning equipment or utensils must be used safely and according to manufacturer’s instructions.
The correct operation of cleaning equipment:
17
o
o
o
Avoids injury to the operator
Prolongs the life of the cleaning item
Achieves a better cleaning outcome.
Protective equipment
Goggles for Eye Protection
When using oven and grill cleaners it is advisable to be wearing eye
protection. All MSDS will include information on eye protection to
protect against splatter of the cleaning chemical.
Face Masks
When using oven and grill cleaners it is advisable to be wearing face
masks for protection of the airways.
Fumes that are breathed in as cleaning is carried out with chemical
that give off gaseous vapours can be harmful to the long term health of the user.
Again, look at MSDS for guidance.
Chemicals
Chemicals used for cleaning in food areas
o General detergent
o Dishwasher detergent
o Floor cleaner
o Drain cleaner
o Bleach
o Oven cleaner
o Grill cleaner
o Sanitisers.
All of this will have special requirements and some will have very Specific Instructions on how to use
them.
1.3
Implement cleaning procedures in accordance with enterprise and legislated requirements
Introduction
Food Safety plan will identify what cleaning that needs to be done and when.
Enterprise and legislated requirements will relate to:
o Understanding and implementation of the food safety plan/program for the premises
o Implementation of workplace cleaning rosters, schedules and cleaning sheets
o Details of policies and procedures of the host enterprise.
Details of the statutory requirements of the legislation of the host country in regard to the safety and
hygiene of food premises, and environmental concerns relating to waste disposal especially of food
waste, fats and oils and chemical agents.
Part of the role of cleaning and maintaining kitchen premises may be to sort waste and dispose of it
according to hygiene regulations, enterprise practices and procedures, and environmental
considerations.
The Process of cleaning
Remove all visible waste from the area to be cleaned
o This is to make it easier to clean. Once you add water to an area then anything that is
there becomes redundant and will not be able to be used in the future.
18
Apply cleaning agent and allow it to work on the area
o This may be just hot soapy water or a cleaning chemical that needs to ‘sit’ to give time
for its properties to be effective.
Remove the cleaning agent and restore area to it correct Condition
o In the kitchen this may require you to rinse detergent
off bench and allow to air dry before adding the
sanitiser.
All processes must have a start point and a finish point.
Then process must meet local food safety requirements as well as
environmental standards.
CLEANING SCHEDULE CHECKLIST
Date:
Sign each day dot
#
Item
Benches and Sinks
Commencing: Monday
Week 1 2 3 4 5 (circle week)
M
T
W
Th
F
S
S
Utensils, cutlery and crockery
Rubbish bins
Tidy fridge
Floor
Trolleys
Benches and Fridges
Mechanical Equipment
Dishwasher
Storage shelving
Walls and cupboards up to 2100mm
Fridges and cool rooms
Food storage wheelie bins
All freezers
Chopping boards
Storerooms
Ovens
Rubbish Bins
Hand Basin/paper and soap dispenser
Floors
Electrical switches, door handles
Floor Mats
Floor Grates
Fire extinguishers
All windows and doors
Stainless steel canopies
Fly zappers
19
CLEANING SCHEDULE CHECKLIST
Date:
Sign each day dot
#
Item
Walls
Fans
Air vents
Lights
Ceilings
Commencing: Monday
Week 1 2 3 4 5 (circle week)
M
T
W
Th
F
S
S
KITCHEN: CLEANING SCHEDULE
Ensure all electrical items are off & unplugged before cleaning procedures begin.
RESPONSIBILITIES:
All cleaning duties are to be carried out by nominated personnel.
#
Item
When
How
What with
Students
Benches and End of Class
Remove food particles with a
Scraper, hot soapy water,
sinks
clean cloth and wash with
Use “panclean”, clean
warm soapy water including
damp cloth or disposable
sides and front of bench. Rinse cloth, gloves and sanitise
with clean warm water, spray with “J512”to MSDS
on sanitiser and allow to dry
Stoves
End of Class
Remove loose debris with
Scotch Brite Pad, clean
Scotch Brite pad. Wash stove
cloth, “J512” sanitiser to
with hot soapy water. Using
MSDS, “pan clean” bucket
clean cloth wipe stove top,
rubber gloves and paper
front and side
towel.
Utensils,
After use
Remove soil, wash in hot
Commercial dishwasher
cutlery and
water and detergent and rinse “Powder 102”, “Rinse Aid
crockery
in hot water. Allow to air dry
163” to MSDS, “panclean”
Rubbish Bins End of Class
Remove wheelie bin and place Clean bin liner
in laneway marked “full bins”
and collect clean bin with bin
liner
Tidy Fridge
End of class
Ensure all perishable food is in Cloth, “panclean” and
storage container or covered
“J512 sanitiser to MSDS.
with Glad wrap and ensure
that all food is clearly labelled
and dated. Tidy inside fridge
and wipe door and door
handle with a clean damp
cloth
Floor
End of class
Sweep with broom to remove Dustpan and broom, Mop,
dirt/food scraps and place in
Mop bucket “Stride” floor
bin. Mop floors as required,
cleaner and “J512”
sanitise mop and hang up to
sanitiser to MSDS.
dry
20
RESPONSIBILITIES:
All cleaning duties are to be carried out by nominated personnel.
#
Item
When
How
Kitchen
End of class
Remove loose debris with
Trolley
clean damp cloth using hot
water and detergent. Spray
with sanitiser. Allow to air dry
Kitchen Attendants
Benches and Start of the
Remove food particles with a
sinks
day
clean cloth and wash with
warm soapy water including
sides and front of bench.
Commence from top to
bottom including wiping
shelves. Rinse with clean
warm water, spray on
sanitiser and allow to dry
Stoves and
Start of the
Remove stove tops and wash
exterior
day
with hot soapy water. Wipe
stove top, front and sides and
reassemble stove. Spray on
sanitiser and allow drying
Mechanical
Start of the
Turn off power and wash
Equipment
day
removable parts in hot soapy
water and allow to air dry.
Wipe equipment with clean
damp cloth and allow drying.
Spray with sanitiser
Dishwasher
End of day
Turn off power and remove
and as
the plug to drain machine.
required
Clean filters and check
dispensing probe to ensure
that there is no food scraps.
Wash the inside and outside
with a clean damp cloth.
Check if there is sufficient
detergent and rinse aid and
replace as required
Storage
Weekly
Wash around all shelves.
Shelving
Remove and dust soil with a
clean damp cloth. Wash with
hot water and sanitise, allow
drying. Replace any items
Walls and
Weekly
Wash walls with hot soapy
Cupboards
water & sanitise
up to
2100mm
What with
Cloth, “panclean”, bucket,
“J512” sanitiser to MSDS.
Scraper, Use “panclean”,
clean damp cloth or
disposable cloth, gloves
and sanitise with “J512” to
MSDS.
Scotch Brite Pad, clean
cloth, “J512” sanitiser to
MSDS, “panclean” bucket
rubber gloves and paper
towel.
Use “panclean”, clean
damp cloth or disposable
cloth, gloves and sanitise
with “J512” to MSDS.
Clean damp cloth,
“panclean”, “Powder 102”,
“Rinse Aid 163” to MSDS.
Hot soapy water, Use
“panclean”, clean damp
cloth or disposable cloth,
gloves and sanitise with
“J512” to MSDS
Use “panclean", clean
damp cloth or disposable
cloth and “J512” sanitiser
to MSDS.
21
RESPONSIBILITIES:
All cleaning duties are to be carried out by nominated personnel.
#
Item
When
How
Fridges and
Weekly
Remove food residue or
cool rooms
spillages. Wipe door handles.
Clean shelving and rubber
seals. Wash shelves, walls and
floors with hot soapy water
using “Breakup” or “Stride”.
Apply sanitiser and allow
drying
Food storage Weekly
Remove dust and dirt with a
wheelie bins
clean damp cloth and hot
soapy water. Wash internally
and externally and apply
sanitiser and allow to air dry
All Freezers
First Monday Remove food scrapes from
(2)
each Month
freezers and scrape away any
ice that has built up. Tidy up
shelves ensuring they are
clean and food is correctly
covered and dated. Wash
stains with hot water &
detergent. Rinse with clean
sanitised water
Chopping
After useEnd Remove loose debris with
Boards
of day
clean cloth. Wash chopping
boards in hot water &
detergent. Rinse with hot
water & sanitiser air dry or
wipe over with paper towel
Storerooms
First Monday Remove food residue or
each Month
spillages. Wipe door handles.
Clean shelving: Monday : 1st
shelf, Tuesday: 2nd
shelf,Wednesday 1stTrolley,
Thursday: middle trolley,
Friday: last trolley. Plastic
shelving to go through
dishwasher
Ovens
6 monthly
Spray interior of ovens with
industrial oven cleaner. Wipe
clean with damp cloth and hot
soapy water. Allow to dry
Rubbish Bins End of shift
Take out rubbish to the
designated area, replace with
new clean bin liner
What with
Hot soapy water, Use
“panclean”, clean damp
cloth or disposable cloth,
gloves and sanitise with
“J512” to MSDS, Mop
bucket, “Stride” or
“Breakup” to MSDS,
handscraper
Use “panclean”, clean
damp cloth or disposable
cloth and “J512” sanitiser
to MSDS
Broom, Mop & bucket of,
hot water with “Breakup”
for floors. For shelving:
bucket hot water &
“panclean”, rinse water &
clean cloth, rubber gloves
Hot water, “panclean” and
paper towel or cloth
Broom, Mop & bucket of,
hot water with “Breakup”
for floors. For shelving:
bucket hot water &
“panclean” rinse water &
clean cloth, rubber gloves
“Mr Muscle” to MSDS,
bucket hot water &
“panclean” rinse water &
clean cloth, rubber gloves
New bin liners
22
RESPONSIBILITIES:
All cleaning duties are to be carried out by nominated personnel.
#
Item
When
How
Hand Basin/
Daily or
Clean with sanitising cleaner,
Paper and
more if
rinse. Replace hand soap and
Soap
required
paper towel as required. Wipe
Dispenser
tops daily. Check taps are
working and water is correct
temperature (warm)
First aid
Weekly
Wipe with a wet cleaning
Cabinet
cloth.
Check the top surface for any
build of dust, remove as
necessary
Fire
Weekly
Wipe with a wet cleaning
Extinguishers
cloth.
Check the top surface for any
build of dust, remove as
necessary
Scrubbing
Daily
Wash through the dishwasher
brushes
or soak in’ Diversol’ for 10
minutes then rinse and air dry
Property Services Cleaning Staff
Floors &
Daily
Sweep and mop floors. Scrub
Grates
with commercial scrubber.
Sanitise mops and hang up over
night to dry. Lift and wash with
hot soapy water. Clean and rinse
traps
Electrical
Daily
Wipe clean with dry cloth and
switches,
“Future”
Door Handles
Floor Mats
Weekly
Remove dry soil, wash, rinse and
allow to air dry.
Floor grates
Weekly
Remove debris with brush and
pressure wash grate top and
drain. Remove and empty silt trap
(if applicable)
Fire
Monthly
Wipe clean with clean damp cloth
Extinguishers
All windows
Monthly
For windows, spray on window
and Doors
cleaner and wipe clean. For
doors, wipe clean
What with
Hot soapy water, Use
“panclean”, clean damp
cloth or disposable cloth,
gloves and sanitise with
“J512” to MSDS
Clean cloth, ‘Panclean’,
sponge scourer if needed
Clean cloth, ‘panclean’,
sponge scourer if needed
Dishwasher or
‘Diversol’- to MSDS
Mop, bucket, “Stride or
“Breakup”, commercial
scrubber, dust pan &
broom
“Future”, clean cloth or
disposable cloth
Hose brush and
“Breakup”
Scrubbing brush, Pressure
unit and “Breakup”
“Future”, clean cloth or
disposable cloth
Windows use “sparkle”
and dry cloth. Doors use
“future” and dry cloth
23
RESPONSIBILITIES:
All cleaning duties are to be carried out by nominated personnel.
#
Item
When
How
What with
Stainless
Quarterly
Wash with soapy water including Commercial dishwasher,
Steel
all glass and stainless steel.
“Powder 103”, “Rinse
Canopies
Remove filters and wash in
Aid”, “Sparkle”, squeegee
dishwasher. Allow to air dry and
clean cloths and brush
coat with protective polish
Walls
6 monthly
Wash walls with hot soapy water Use “panclean”, clean
&sanitising detergent
damp cloth or disposable
cloth
Fans
6 monthly
Wash fans taking care not to let
Use “panclean”, clean
any dust particles fall in food
damp cloth or disposable
preparation areas
cloth
Air Vents
6 monthly
Wash around the surrounds with Use “panclean”, clean
hot water and detergent. Clean
damp cloth or disposable
rinse water and damp cloth.
cloth
Ensure no cooking procedures are
taking place & all food
preparation benches and
equipment are covered over
before commencing to avoid risk
of dust falling into food
Lights
6 monthly
Ensure lights are turned off for at Disposable dry cloth and
least ten minutes and wipe clean “Future”
with “Future” by spraying on the
disposable rag first and then
wiping
Ceilings
Yearly
Remove oil, wash and rinse with
Cloth cloths, “Future or
warm soapy water. Allow to air
“Breakup”, brush
dry
Filters
Monthly
Remove filters and wash in
Commercial dishwasher,
dishwasher
“Powder 103”, “Rinse
Aid”
CLEANING SCHEDULE CHECKLIST – KITCHEN
Date
Commencing: Monday
Sign each day dot
Week 1 2 3 4 5 (circle week)
Week 1 2 3 4 5 (circle week)
#
Item
M T
W T
F
M T
W T
F
Students
1.
Benches and sinks










2.
Stoves










Utensils, cutlery and
3.










crockery
4.
Rubbish Bins










5.
Tidy Fridge










6.
Floor










24
CLEANING SCHEDULE CHECKLIST – KITCHEN
Date
Commencing: Monday
Sign each day dot
Week 1 2 3 4 5 (circle week)
Week 1 2 3 4 5 (circle week)
#
Item
M T
W T
F
M T
W T
F
7.
Kitchen Trolley










Kitchen Attendants
8.
Benches and sinks










9.
Stoves and exterior










10. Mechanical Equipment










11. Dishwasher










12. Storage Shelving


13. Walls and Cupboards up to


2100mm
14. Fridges and cool rooms


15. Food storage wheelie bins


16. All Freezers (2)
Monthly
Monthly


17. Chopping Boards










18. Storerooms
Monthly
Monthly


19. Ovens
6 Monthly
6 Monthly


20. Rubbish Bins










21. Hand Basin/ Paper and Soap










Dispenser
22. Floors & Grates










23. Electrical switches, Door










Handles
24. Floor Mats


25. Floor grates


26. Fire Extinguishers
Monthly
Monthly


27. All windows and Doors
Monthly
Monthly


28. Stainless Steel Canopies
Quarterly
Quarterly


29. Walls
6 Monthly
6 Monthly


30. Fans
6 Monthly
6 Monthly


31. Air Vents
6 Monthly
6 Monthly


32. Lights
6 Monthly
6 Monthly


33. Ceilings
Yearly
Yearly


34. Filters
Monthly
Monthly


Material safety data sheet (MSDS)
A material safety data sheet (MSDS) is an important aspect of
occupational safety and health.
It is intended to provide workers and emergency personnel with
procedures for handling or working with that substance in a safe
manner, and includes information such as:
o Physical data
o Toxicity or potential hazards
25
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
Health effects
Procedures for safe use
First aid
Reactivity
Storage
Disposal
Protective equipment
Spill-handling procedures.
STEPS ASSOCIATED WITH CLEANING EACH AREA
Workbenches
These are the areas that will be cleaned the most.
o Cleaned after every change of job.
Process of cleaning will be:
o Remove any materials that are visible
o Wash with hot water with detergent:
 Hot water is to soften any fats and the detergent will help remove the fats
o Scour with cloth or fibrous material to break up debris that is adhered to surface
o Rinse with hot water
o Allow surface to air dry
o Apply sanitiser and use to manufacturers’ instruction
instructi on MSDS sheet.
Some sanitisers are allowed to dissipate in the air others will need to be left for a period of time (usually
5 minutes) and then they are wiped off with clean paper
hand towel.
Kitchen Utensils
o Cooks knives
o Chopping boards
o Stainless steel bowls
o Pots
o Pans
o Plates
o Platters.
Any utensil that you use in the preparation of raw and cooked foods
need to be washed sanitised and dried before use continue working
with them in the kitchen.
Especially important if you are working with high protein, high risk
foods such as meats dairy products, seafood, cooked pasta, cooked rice.
Working with dry ingredients like flour, sugar and other low moisture
ingredients this level of cleaning is not so important.
Modern kitchen will drainage systems in the floor so that when it is swept of visible matter it can be
scrubbed with hot water and detergent then rinsed with hot water and then excess water can easily be
squeegee into the drain.
Using too much water may cause difficulties in removing said water.
water
Floors may need to be cleaned 4-5
5 times a day or as needed due to spillages.
26
Storage areas
These also need to be cleaned on a daily basis.
Cool storage - refrigeration (walk in, free standing)
Walk in cool rooms will need to be cleaned and tidied on a daily basis and the
floor washed at least once a day with hot water and detergent.
Free standing refrigeration will need to be monitored and the internal floor will
need to be cleaned regularly. It is a good idea to clean daily.
Freezer Storage
This area is more difficult to clean as any spills will be of a hard nature unless
there is a spillage of badly wrapped liquids before it has had a chance to harden.
To clean freezers:
o All stock needs to be removed
o Allow air to come to room temperature
o Then proceed as normal cleaning with water and detergent.
When surfaces are dry then freezer needs to be turned on and when correct temperature is reached
then frozen foods can then placed back into the freezer.
Sinks
Sinks need to be cleaned on an ongoing basis. There are 4 types of sinks
that may be installed in modern kitchens:
 Hand washing sinks
 Food washing sinks
 General purpose cleaning sinks
 Floor washing sink which is normally situated away from food
preparation areas.
These should be cleaned as used. Final cleaning at the end of the day they
should be sanitised and dried.
Drains
Drains will need to have their covers removed and then washed and
sanitised. The covers will need to have any trapped debris removed before
cleaning. If drains are cleaned on regular basis there is no need to dry
them. They will air dry.
Walls of food production areas
These will need to be cleaned as needed and cleaned on a weekly or
fortnightly basis as stated in FSP.
Higher than this can be cleaned on a 3 month cycle or as needed.
Air filters and vents
o Over stoves and ovens
o Air conditioning
o Air flow vents in walls.
Vents over stoves need to be cleaned on a weekly basis as there will be a
build up of grease which will fall back into food being prepared if allowed
27
to build up too much.
Air-conditioning
conditioning and any air flow vent in your establishment will need to be cleaned at least once every
12 months if not sooner.
Staff changes rooms
While this is not as higher priority as the food production area it is still an
area that needs to be checked and cleaned regularly, daily.
Staff might leave food there and if there is not a lot of traffic there will
eventually be an infestation of pests of some type.
Smells tend to build up in these areas from soiled clothing and these issues
is
need to be addressed.
Garbage Storage areas
This is the area where all garbage is collected from within the establishment and
it is brought to a specific location before it is sorted, recycled and disposed of by
the establishment.
Types of garbage
o Compostable landfill
o Paper products that can be recycled
o Plastic containers, recyclable and non recyclable
o Glass
o Oil waste, not allowed to put down the drains
o Metals, broken equipment, aluminium containers.
Each of these should have their own areas in the garbage storage areas and need to
be kept clean and secure.
The ground or floor area will need to be kept clean with spills cleaned up as they
happen.
If garbage is allowed to collect on the floor or ground and it is not cleaned it is likely
to attract pests and rodents.
Therefore cleaning in garbage storage areas is vitally important.
Modern practice is to have plastic liners in the bins to cut
down on the need to wash bins every time they are
emptied. Garbage bins still need to be cleaned on a daily
basis and allowed to air dry before being used again the
next day:
o Air drying is best achieved by leaving
them turned upside down after washing
with air allowed to flow under the top of
the bin.
When dry internally they can then be stood back onto
their base and relined with clean plastic liner, lid replaced
and it is ready for the next service period.
28
Food Safety Plan (FSP) should nominate everything to be cleaned at some stage including higher parts of
the walls and ceilings:
o Clocks
o Fire extinguishers
o First aid kits.
o Anything attached to walls as well.
Work Instruction or Job Safety Analysis Sheets
A Work Instruction (WI), Job Safety Analysis (JSA) or SOP
(Standard Operating Procedure) may be provided by the
employer to assist in cleaning and in the application of
chemicals.
The following is an example of what may be available.
Wet Mopping of floor
Prepared by:
Date:
Step
Prepare the area
Hazard type
(and rating)
Physical
Slips and
trips(low)
Prepare
equipment and
materials
Chemical
(low)
Mop the floor
Chemical and
physical
(medium)
Action/precautions required

















Clean up
Chemical and
Physical (low)



Set up ‘Cleaning in progress’ signs
Pick up loose rubbish
Move items that present obstacles
Sweep the floor
Put on safety gloves and glasses
Fill mop bucket with warm water
Add 250 ml of XYZ detergent – use ‘red’ measuring
jug
Move mop and bucket to area to be mopped
Put mop in bucket to wet it thoroughly
Use rollers to wring mop until damp
Apply mop to floor – use 8-pattern, smooth but firm
strokes on open surfaces and straight stokes against
walls
Rinse mop and repeat until finished
Empty bucket into gully trap and rinse mop and
bucket
Fill mop bucket with warm water
Add 250 ml of XYZ disinfectant – use ‘yellow’
measuring jug
Apply as above
Allow to dry – set up ‘Wet floors’ signs where
appropriate
Return moved items
Remove and dispose of rubbish picked up during
preparation – external dumper
Wash mop and bucket
29



Dispose of protective gloves
Return equipment and chemicals to storage
Wash hands
1.4 Identify and address cleaning and sanitizing needs that arise in addition to scheduled cleaning
requirements
Introduction
Cleaning Schedules are just a guide so that nothing is missed.
Emergency cleaning will always need to take place rather
than just cleaning to schedule.
Spills and dropped items
There should be emergency contingencies for accidental
spills and breakages.
You cannot say ‘I will clean this up when the area is due to
be cleaned tomorrow’.
Occupational Health and Safety responsibilities dictate that
all areas must be safe. Spillage and breakages.
There is an immediate need for items/areas that are not
scheduled for cleaning:
o Worker safety
o Customer safety.
Who is responsible for safety in the workplace?
o Everybody.
Workplace incidents and accidents that should include cleaning up in all back-of-house areas, such as
receiving areas, stores, preparation areas, plating and service areas.
Cleaning schedules will say that floors will need to be cleaned twice a day but what happens if there is a
spill of flour on the floor. The flour, if not cleaned, will be walked all over the kitchen floor and then it
will go outside the immediate work area and end up all through the premises.
1.5 Store cleaning items and chemicals, and clean where applicable, after cleaning has been completed
Introduction
It is important for all equipment to be cleaned after every use before storage. This will ensure that dirt
and grime from a previous cleaning task is not transferred on to another surface, this reduces the
possibility of cross contamination.
It also means the items of cleaning equipment are ready for immediate use should there be a need to
use them in the event of an emergency.
Putting cleaning items back in their designated location also means that other staff are able to access
them when they need to.
30
Storing cleaning equipment
Equipment that requires cleaning prior to storage includes the following:
Mops
Washing mops must, on a regular basis, be washed in hot soapy water, rinsed thoroughly, squeezedried, and then hung up to air dry.
Standard procedure in food areas is for mops to be sanitised as well.
Brooms and brushes
Cleaning of brooms and brushes involves them being shaken clean, washed in hot soapy water, and then
left to air dry. Again, there may be a requirement to sanitise them.
Cloths and sponges
These should be cleaned on a regular basis using hot soapy water, and left to air dry.
Buckets
They should be cleaned out thoroughly after each use with hot soapy water, and then turned upside
down left to air dry.
Vacuum cleaners
All vacuum cleaners must be cleaned out at the end of each shift and the bag replaced, if required. The
machine and its attachments must be wiped clean. The power cord should be wrapped correctly and
safely. All cleaning of such equipment must be done in accordance with manufacturer’s instructions.
Floor machines
Floor machines and all their attachments must be cleaned on a regular basis. All cleaning of such
equipment and attachments must be done in accordance with manufacturer’s instructions.
Pressure washers
These need to be emptied (where applicable) by draining the item, dried externally and then have the
hoses either disconnected for storage (as per manufacturer’s instructions) or stored on the machine
itself.
Dishwashers
Dishwashers should be cleaned in strict accordance with manufacturer’s instructions.
These may include:
o Clearing and removing filters – cleaning filters, cleaning filter reservoir
o Wiping away all loose debris
o Washing the inside of the machine with detergent, rinsing, sanitising and rinsing again
o Removing and cleaning spray arms
o Removing any visible food debris
o Wiping the exterior of the machine – including runways to and from the machine
o Cleaning and sanitising trays used in the machine for crockery and cutlery.
Storage of cleaning equipment
Generally, all cleaning equipment has a designated storage area.
Before equipment can be stored away, it should be checked to
ensure it is clean and ready to be reused as required.
It is important that equipment is stored in a clean condition and in
the right location for a number of reasons, some of which may
include:
o So that equipment can be quickly and
conveniently located
o So that equipment can be reused straight away
31
o
o
For stock taking purposes
Away from food preparation areas.
Storage of Chemicals
Chemicals are important within the kitchen environment. Chemical are not to be ingested by the public
in their food.
Storage of these chemicals in a safe environment is very important.
There is a need store chemical away from the food production area as part of your Food Safety Plan
(FSP).
Chemicals that you might find in kitchen environment are:
o General detergent
o Dishwasher detergent
o Floor cleaner
o Drain cleaner
o Bleach
o Oven cleaner
o Grill cleaner
o Sanitisers.
Storage of chemicals
The correct storage of chemicals is of the utmost importance. Storage areas must be prepared with the
appropriate drainage, safety equipment, fire sprinklers and the correct firefighting equipment. They
must also have good ventilation.
Access to these stores should be restricted only to staff who have received appropriate Occupational
Health and Safety (OHS) training in handling chemicals.
What are the general requirements?
Any undiluted chemicals remaining on your cleaning trolley or in your cleaning bucket must be stored
safely at the end of the shift/cleaning task.
House policies will determine whether these chemicals need to be stored in the chemicals store or if
they can be returned to the cleaning storeroom.
The following guidelines need to be considered when storing chemicals:
o Keep in a storeroom away from other products – the room should be marked
‘dangerous goods’, have necessary HAZCHEM signage, and restricted access
o A register should be maintained to record items in accordance
with legislated requirements
o The store room for chemicals must be well lit and ventilated
o The room should only be used for storing chemicals
o Heavy containers must be stored on lower shelves to avoid the
need for lifting, and to minimise the chance of spills
o Keep containers well sealed and labelled
o Have MSDS and first aid directions posted in the area – together
with first aid resources to support possible treatment
requirements
o Keep away from a naked flame or excessive heat
o Product usage charts should be close to the chemicals for easy and clear reference
purposes – including details relating to dilution, items that chemicals can be used on
32
Instructions for safe chemical handling must be posted
poste – to provide instruction on
decanting chemicals
o Necessary PPE should be present – gloves, aprons, respirators, gauntlets, hoses, etc
o Never store chemicals or cleaning agents in food containers
o Never store chemicals with food
o Do not allow customers to come
come into contact with chemicals, or entry into the chemicals
storage area
o Never mix chemicals together – some may explode
o Ensure measuring devices for chemicals are not used for any other purpose.
How much is left?
When storing left-over
over chemicals it is a standard
requirement that you check what cleaning agents and
chemicals remain in storage.
Where you believe you are running low you need to
pass this on to your supervisor, the manager/owner or
the Purchasing Officer.
In some cases you may have to complete a requisition
form to order replacement stock.
o
1.6 Follow emergency first aid procedures in the event of a cleaning-related
cleaning related incident or accident
Introduction
Emergency first aid procedures may include
o Notifying internal first aid officers of emergencies
emergenci
o Contacting external emergency services for assistance
o Administering basic first aid for minor cuts, bruises,
abrasions, burns and scalds.
Administering basic first aid in accordance with relevant chemical
information sheets where chemicals have been spilled on skin, been
ingested, or have entered into the eyes.
Material Safety Data Sheets
All chemical companies must produce these and make them available to
customers to post on walls in the areas where their chemical are being
used.
This is to educate the workers and make first aid easier to implement if
accidents do occur in the workplace.
Internal First Aid officers
All staff working in a kitchen environment should undertake basic first aid training.
The kitchen is considered a dangerous workplace and
and when accidents happen it is important that people
have some idea what to do when disaster strikes.
Correct use and storage of chemicals
It is important not to mix chemicals in the workplace. Chemical should be stored in the containers in
which they are purchased. If they are placed into smaller containers for ease of usage then those
containers need to be marked accordingly.
33
Applying appropriate first aid measures in emergency situations
When medical emergencies are required the appropriate first aid measures must be taken.
Every organisation should have detailed procedures that must be followed when accidents take place.
These procedures may be designed by the organisation itself or provided by suppliers of equipment and
cleaning agents.
On the following page is an example of a procedure detailed for use when chemicals come into contact
with a person.
See sample below:
Eye
Skin
Inhalation
Ingestion
Advice to
Doctor
First Aid measure
If in eyes, hold eyelids apart and flush the eye continuously with running water.
Continue flushing for at least 15 minutes or until advised by appropriate medical
person.
If skin or hair contact occurs, remove contaminated clothing and flush skin and
hair with running water. Continue flushing with water until advised by appropriate
medical person.
If inhaled, remove from contaminated area. To protect rescuer, use an Air-line
respirator where an inhalation risk exists. Apply artificial respiration if not
breathing.
For advice, contact appropriate medical person or a doctor at once. If swallowed,
do not induce vomiting.
CORROSIVE POISONING TREATMENT: Immediate treatment preferably in a
hospital is mandatory. In treatingcorrosive poisoning,
DO NOT INDUCE VOMITING; DO NOT ATTEMPT GASTRIC LAVAGE; and DO NOT
ATTEMPT TO NEUTRALISE THE CORROSIVE SUBSTANCE.
Vomiting will increase the severity of damage to the oesophagus as the corrosive
substance will again come in contact with it.
Attempting gastric lavage may result in perforating either the oesophagus or
stomach.
Immediately dilute the corrosive substance by having the patient drink milk or
water. If the trachea has been damaged tracheotomy may be required.
For oesophageal burns begin broad-spectrum antibiotics and corticosteroid
therapy. Intravenous fluids will be required if oesophageal or gastric damage
prevents ingestion of liquids.
Long-range therapy will be directed toward preventing or treating oesophageal
scars and strictures. Treat as for strongly alkaline material.
Language differences
Given that most workplaces have people, both staff and customers, from all corners of the globe,
written language can sometimes be hard to understand and interpret. Therefore government
regulations state that warning Occupational Health and Safety data is produced in multiple languages.
Many warning signs now use symbols rather than words.
International Signage
How many can you identify?
HAZCHEM is the international signage for hazardous chemicals.
34
What is the International sign for Stop? Describe it to your trainer.
Work Projects
It is a requirement of this Unit you complete Work Projects as advised by your Trainer. You must submit
documentation, suitable evidence or other relevant proof of completion of the project to your Trainer
by the agreed date.
1.1 Supply a cleaning schedule for the kitchen where you work, identifying your responsibilities as
identified by that schedule.
1.2. Supply a copy of a MSDS for one chemical used in the cleaning of equipment etc. in the kitchen
where you work.
1.3 Select one area in the kitchen and set out the cleaning requirements for that area.
1.4. Supply a plan of action to augment any cleaning requirements outside the cleaning schedule.
1.5 Supply a drawing of plan of a cleaning room:
o Show list of chemicals being stored
o List 6 chemicals
o Supply MSDS for each of the chemicals
o Show how you would layout the chemicals in this room.
1.6 Pick one cleaning chemical, state its intended use and supply a list of first aid practices that will
alleviate long term harm to people.
35
Summary
Identify the role of room attendants
Identify the areas that may require cleaning in a kitchen premises environment and the
frequency of cleaning for each identified area
All areas are to be cleaned on a regular basis. It is just not the areas that can be seen but also the
areas that are not easily observed:
 Behind the stove
 Under benches
 Staff changeroom
 On top of shelving above eye sight height
 Bottom edges of workbenches.
A cleaning schedule needs to be developed for ALL areas within the enterprise and all areas and
equipment needs to be listed on that cleaning schedule.
Select appropriate cleaning utensils and chemicals
When cleaning kitchen equipment and kitchens utensils it is advantages to have the correct
cleaning utensils and cleaning equipment:
 Is the broom big enough for large floor spaces
 Is the mop too heavy for the person using it?
Bigger is not always better, sometimes small is more efficient. Work flow needs to be developed
and modified as circumstances change.
Implement cleaning procedures in accordance with enterprise and legislated requirements
Cleaning schedules must adhere to the requirements of the legislation of the area of where the
enterprise is operating. You can implement higher standards that will compliment the market
point in which you are operating.
A 5 star enterprise will have a higher standard than a 2 star. An expensive restaurant will be
different to a small business street stall.
Enterprise standard is different to legislative standards.
Identify and address cleaning and sanitising needs that arise in addition to scheduled cleaning
requirements
A cleaning schedule is just a guide. There will be times that adjustments will need to be made
and procedures need to be implemented that will address ‘spillages and breakage’s they occur.
Floors might be scheduled to be cleaned 3 times a day. In actual fact they might get cleaned 5
times due to spillages in that area.
Store cleaning items and chemicals, and clean where applicable, after cleaning has been
completed
Cleaning and chemical go together. Chemical usage cannot be avoided in the kitchen. They can
be minimised but not avoided totally.
Cleaning chemicals are toxic to human if they are ingested through the food they eat.
The only way to avoid this problem is to keep cleaning chemicals and food separate, also
minimise chemical residue on food production surfaces.
36
When kitchen equipment is cleaned all traces of cleaning chemicals must be removed from the
kitchen equipment before it is used to produce food that is to be consumed to the humans.
Safe storage of chemical is imperative.
Follow emergency first aid procedures in the event of a cleaning-related incident or accident
Using cleaning chemicals make the job of cleaning kitchen equipment easier and more efficient.
Some chemicals are corrosive when coming into contact with parts of the human body.
While care must be taken when using chemical everybody must be aware of FIRST AID
procedures when working with these chemicals and must know what is to be done when
exposed to the cleaning chemicals.
What is the chemical?
What precautions must be followed when using these chemicals?
What is the first aid procedure?
2 CLEAN AND MAINTAIN KITCHEN EQUIPMENT AND UTENSILS
2.1
Identify the equipment and utensils that may require cleaning in a kitchen premises
environment and the frequency of cleaning for each identified item
Introduction
The practical tasks involved in cleaning a kitchen and its equipment, utensils etc.
are not appealing or attractive jobs but they are nonetheless work that must be
approached with the right attitude and done properly.
General cleaning requirements
The general requirements are:
o Follow manufacturer’s instructions in relation to using chemicals on the equipment
o Follow manufacturer’s instructions when cleaning their equipment – all equipment will
have suggested cleaning techniques and recommended cleaning chemicals or solutions
o Pay attention to the job – take pride in the work and do it properly, fully and with due
attention to detail. Your failure to clean items correctly may give rise to an outbreak of
food poisoning that could kill someone
o Don’t cause any damage to anything being cleaned – this
requires you to use the right chemical for the right job, dilute
as recommended by the manufacturer, and use the correct
cleaning equipment.
Cleaning and sanitizing – defined
Cleaning can be defined as the removal of visible dirt and debris (including
rust) either from crockery, cutlery, glasses, equipment or fixtures and fittings.
It also includes the removal of odour – this essentially relates to the cleaning
of rubbish bins.
Sanitation takes things a whole lot further and can be defined as the killing of
microbes using either hot water or chemicals.
37
Cleaning is performed before sanitation and where chemicals are used, the manufacturer’s instructions
in relation to dilution rates, contact time and temperature must be adhered to.
Because bacteria/microbes cannot be seen with the naked eye, the point in differentiating between
cleaning and sanitising is that an item may look clean but still be unsafe – from a food hygiene point of
view – to use.
Equipment and utensils to be cleaned and sanitized
Anything that is used in the storage, preparation, cooking, display or service of food must be cleaned
and sanitised in accordance with the Food safety Plan (FSP) for the premises.
The requirements of the cleaning schedule provide the basis for determining what has to be cleaned and
sanitised, including when these tasks need to be undertaken.
In general terms, cleaning and sanitising requirements mean that:
o Equipment and utensils must be cleaned and sanitised in between handling raw high
risk food and handling cooked, ready-to-eat food.
o Equipment and utensils must be cleaned and sanitised at least after each service
session. It is not acceptable or legal to use a piece of equipment (such as a meat slicer
throughout the day and only clean and sanitise it once at the end of the day.
In specific terms, your venue will have a need to clean and sanitise:
o Crockery
o Glassware
o Cutlery
o Utensils – such as spatulas, slotted spoons, scoops, lifters
o Pieces of food preparation, food storage and food display
equipment such as cool rooms, refrigeration units,
salamanders, toasters, bratt pans, microwaves,
salamanders, stoves and ovens, deep fryers, Bain-maries,
pie warmers, salad wells
o Pots, pans and other dishes
o Containers – used for the storage of food under dry, refrigerated and frozen conditions
o Chopping boards
o Knives.
2.2
Load housekeeping trolley with supplies for service
Cleaning Chemicals
 General detergent
A detergent is a mixture of surfactants in a dilute solution.
A surfactant has the ability to allow to 2 elements that would not normally
mix to bond together.
Oil and water do not normally mix together but when detergent is added
to the washing water the oil and water bond together and the oil is
removed from the surface of the bench.
It can be used on all equipment that is washed by hand and general
cleaning duties. It will break down grease easily but prolonged use
requires the use of gloves by the user.
It should not be used in a dishwasher as it will foam and not wash
properly.
38
 Dishwasher detergent
Will only work when used in a machine. It is corrosive to human skin and must only behandled when
person is wearing protection for the hands.
Most modern dishwashing machines will have 2 units of cleaning liquid:
o One for washing: does not foam but will break down grease and leave utensils clean
o Second is a ‘rinse’ agent that sanitises utensils and help to dispel water to leave minimal
water marks after the utensils air-dry.

Floor cleaner
Specially designed for cleaning floors, does not foam.
 Drain cleaner
Caustic in nature and protection must be worn when handling. When activated by addition of water
person should be wearing heavy duty protection for body, face, eye and hands.
 Bleach
Caustic in nature and protection must be worn when handling. Area should be wellventilated. Bleach
should be diluted as per MSDS before using. Hand protection is required.
 Oven and Grill cleaner
Caustic in nature and protection must be worn when handling. When activated person should be
wearing heavy duty protection for body, face, eye and hands.
 Sanitisers
Must not be used outside of MSDS. If diluted more than is recommended then it will not be effective. If
applied to wet surfaces it will not be effective.
Assembling and disassembling cleaning equipment
In section 1.2 the range of different cleaning equipment items were identified.
By how must they be assembled to perform their tasks?
The assembling and disassembling of cleaning equipment in a kitchen context is fairly basic.
It should essentially mean putting together and taking apart a wet-dry vacuum cleaner or similar
devices.
The primary areas that require attention are the hoses and hose fittings – care must be taken to make
sure:
o If it is an electric device, that it is not turned on until the machine has been prepared
and is ready to use – it should be turned off when assembling or disassembling it
o The right part is being connected – a fitting for a dry vac may not fit the wet vac
o You never force bits – if a connection or fitting won’t ‘go’, don’t exert excess force to it,
this only risks damaging or breaking the part
o When this happens you can’t perform the cleaning task you intended doing and you also
have to get the machine etc. repaired. You also risk injury to yourself.
2.3 Implement cleaning procedures in accordance with enterprise and legislated requirements.
Introduction
Whilst each business will have different policies and procedures in relation to cleanig their kitchen
premises, equipment and utensils there are some general rules that apply in all situations.
Whilst the exact requirements imposed by each government will be different, as an example some
common regulations are stated below.
39
Cleaning and sanitizing of specific equipment
1. A food business must ensure the following equipment is in a clean and sanitary condition in the
circumstances set out below:
a. Eating and drinking utensils — immediately before each use.
Eating and drinking utensils must be in a clean and sanitary condition immediately before they are used.
This does not mean that eating and drinking utensils must be cleaned and sanitised just before use — it
means that eating and drinking utensils must be cleaned, sanitised and protected from contamination
between being used by one person and the next person.
If an eating or drinking utensil is not properly cleaned and sanitised, or has been contaminated after the
cleaning or sanitising took place, the eating or drinking utensil is not considered to be in a ‘clean and
sanitary condition’.
Customers may retain eating and drinking utensils for reuse:
o For example, a customer may reuse a plate to serve themself food from a smorgasbord,
or a drink from a self service bar.
However, if a used eating or drinking utensil is returned to the food business, it cannot be used again
until it has been cleaned and sanitised, whether or not the same person will be reusing the utensil:
o For example, if a drinking glass is returned by a customer to a bar, it cannot be reused
by any person until it has been cleaned and sanitised.
b. The food contact surfaces of equipment - whenever food that will come into contact with the
surface is likely to be contaminated.
‘Food contact surfaces of equipment’ includes any equipment used for handling food that comes into
contact with food:
Examples are chopping boards and other preparation surfaces, mixing bowls, storage containers, display
units, equipment used to wash food, cooking and other processing equipment, and thermometers.
There are many circumstances when food contact surfaces need to be cleaned and sanitised to avoid
contaminating food that will come into contact with that surface.
However, these circumstances will vary, depending on the type of food that will come into contact with
the surface.
A food contact surface must be cleaned and sanitised between being used for raw food and ready-to-eat
food:
o For example, if a person slices raw meat and then tomatoes for a salad, the board and
knife must be cleaned and sanitised between these two uses or separate boards and
knives used for each task.
However, this same food contact surface does not need to be cleaned and sanitised between the uses
described above if the sliced raw meat and tomatoes will both be placed in a saucepan to be cooked for
a casserole.
This is because, in this circumstance, both foods are raw and are to
be cooked before being eaten.
Food contact surfaces may need to be cleaned and sanitised if they
have been used for long periods to prepare or process potentially
hazardous foods. If an appliance is used continuously or
intermittently to prepare or process a potentially hazardous food
outside.
2. In sub clause (1), a ‘clean and sanitary condition’ means, in relation to a surface or utensil, the
condition of a surface or utensil where it:
c. Is clean; and
40
d. Has had applied to it heat or chemicals, heat and chemicals, or other processes, so that the
number of micro-organisms on the surface or utensil has been reduced to a level that:
i.
Does not compromise the safety of the food with which it may come into contact; and
ii.
Does not permit the transmission of infectious disease.
A food business must maintain food premises to a standard of cleanliness where there is no
accumulation of:
a. Garbage, except in garbage containers
b. Recycled matter, except in containers
c. Food waste
d. Dirt
e. Grease; or
f. Other visible matter.
Food premises must be kept clean to minimise the likelihood of food becoming contaminated and to
discourage pests.
The requirement indicates the outcome the food business must achieve from its cleaning system.
The outcome is that the food premises must be maintained to a standard of cleanliness where there is
no accumulation of the things listed.
Food Safety Plans
Where you are cleaning areas in a food context, the FSP should contain instructions of what needs to be
done.
The following is representative:
Cleaning and Sanitation worksheet
Job
 Frequency
Name of the business
Food Safety Plan
Week Date:
Description
Coffee Grinder:
 Daily

Cake (nonrefrigerated) display
unit:
 Daily

Utensils and cutting
boards:
 Daily

Microwave:

Clean the unit at the end of each day’s trade:
 Wipe to remove debris
 Wash with detergent and hot water, rinse and sanitise
 Rinse and allow to air dry.
Clean the cake display unit as required during trade and at the end of
each day’s trade:
 Wipe away loose debris with a clean cloth
 Spot-clean identifiable problem areas
 Wash with detergent and hot water, rinse and sanitise
 Rinse and allow to air dry.
Clean utensils and cutting boards as required during trade and at the
end of each day’s trade:
 Remove debris and rinse with warm water
 Wash with detergent, soaking as required rinse and sanitise
 Rinse and allow to air dry.
Clean the microwave as required during trade and at the end of each
41
Cleaning and Sanitation worksheet
Job
 Frequency

Name of the business
Food Safety Plan
Week Date:
Description
Daily
Sinks (double-bowl
and wash-hand
basin):
 Daily

Toasted sandwich
maker:
 Daily

Cappuccino machine:
 Daily

day’s trade:
 Wipe away loose debris with a clean cloth
 Spot-clean identifiable problem areas
 Wash with detergent and hot water, rinse and sanitise
 Rinse and allow to air dry.
Clean the sinks as required during trade and at the end of each day’s
trade:
 Wipe away loose debris with a clean cloth
 Wash with detergent and hot water, rinse and sanitise
 Rinse and allow to air dry.
Clean the toasted sandwich maker as required during trade and at
the end of each day’s trade:
 Heat the sandwich maker
 Wipe away loose debris with a clean cloth
 Spot-clean identifiable problem areas
 Wash with detergent and hot water, rinse and sanitise
 Rinse and allow to air dry.
Clean the steam wands as required during trade and at the end of
each day’s trade:
 Wipe away all debris from wands and exterior of machine with a
clean cloth
 Wash with detergent and hot water, and rinse
 Rinse and allow to air dry.
Using cleaning and hazard checklists
The following is a ‘Hazard Checklist’ designed specifically for cleaners and useful in identifying areas
involved in cleaning that can present a hazard.
The table below is a list of hazards that are likely to occur when performing cleaning tasks. The table is
an aid for understanding safety/hazard assessments and is not a comprehensive list for all cleaning
tasks.
Specific workplace hazards
Manual handling and 'over use' strain
 Heavy buckets
 Lifting equipment from vehicles
 Handling drums of chemicals
 Prolonged awkward posture from cleaning low surfaces (e.g. scrubbing
floors)
 Reaching over furniture to clean
 Cleaning tools which are too low
 Repetitive actions over a long period (e.g. mopping or sweeping)
Yes
No
42
Specific workplace hazards
 Insufficient training for new starters
 Handling dumpsters
 Manual emptying of waste bins
 Insufficient rest breaks
 Excessive vibrations from equipment
 Badly fitted or heavy vacuum backpacks
 Constant work on a narrow range of tasks
 Lifting heavy cartons or equipment
 Large awkward bags of rubbish
Noise
 Workers exposed to noise levels exceeding 85dBA
 Dumpsters being mover on concrete
 Vacuum cleaners
 Floor polishers
 Power tools
 Lack of earmuffs or other personal protection equipment
Hazardous substances
 Insufficient labelling
 Labelling that is illegible
 Labelling in inappropriate languages
 Excessive dust
 Lack of Material safety Data Sheets
 Bad decanting processes
 Poor ventilation
 Inappropriate storage – containers are too high
 Lack of Personal Protection Equipment
 Bad drainage
 Insufficient safety signage
 Chemicals in a dust rather than granular form
 Non-replacement of hazardous substances
 Inadequate spill control
 Emergency procedures that do not incorporate chemical hazards
 Inadequate training and information
 Insufficient training for employees on reading and use of MSDS
 Not following the MSDS instructions
 No safety/contents labels on spray bottles
 Carpet cleaners and spotters (tetrachlorethylene)
 Oven cleaners (sodium hydroxide)
 Bleach (sodium hypochlorite)
 Bleach (sodium hypochlorite)
 Using chemicals when other processes are available (e.g. chemicals
instead of high pressure hoses)
 Spraying onto a surface instead of directly to a cloth
Yes
No
43
Specific workplace hazards
 Not diluting chemicals
 Putting chemicals into drink bottles rather than spray bottles
Mechanical hazards
 Lack of regular maintenance
 Removal of guards on equipment
 Inappropriate equipment for the task (e.g. dry vacuums for wet areas)
 Ignoring manufacturer’s instructions
 Using plant that does not satisfy Australian Standards
 Machines are too heavy
 Machines vibrate excessively
 Inadequate guarding on compactor
Electrical hazards
 Worn electrical leads
 Twisted and kinked electrical leads
 Infrequent testing of equipment by a qualified electrician
 Insufficient power points which encourages the use of extension leads
 Use of appliances without safety cut-out switches
 Inadequate inspection of equipment prior to use
Working alone
 Violence
 Attempted robbery
 Lack of emergency communication (e.g. mobile phone)
 No co-ordination with the building’s security personnel
 Working alone rather than in pairs
Skin penetrating injuries
 Broken glass
 Sharp objects and needles
 No first aid equipment available
 Placing of needles in rubbish bags rather than solid sharp containers
 Putting hands in places where you cannot see (behind toilets, in the
back of seats)
 Picking up needles with hands rather than tongs
Disease
 Toilet cleaning
 Removal of faecal material including bodily fluids
Personal Protection Equipment
 PPE doesn’t fit properly
 PPE is the wrong type for the specific task (e.g. shoes without a nonslip sole)
 Insufficient training in the correct use of PPE
 PPE that is poorly maintained
 PPE that is not cleaned correctly
 The reuse of disposable PPE
 Non-enforcement by Supervisors of PPE use
Yes
No
44
Specific workplace hazards
Ladders
 Can the task be completed without a ladder?
 Does the ladder comply with Australian Standard AS1892?
 Cracked, split or broken uprights, braces, steps or rungs
 Damaged or worn non-slip bases
 Is the ladder secured at top and bottom?
 Loose nails, screws, bolts or other metal parts
 Broken, split or worn steps or loose hinges
Slips and falls
 Uneven floors
 Work platforms in poor condition
 Floors with no abrasion
 Electrical leads across walkways
 Insufficient lighting levels
 Overloaded trolleys
 Lack of portable safety signage (e.g. ‘Caution – Wet Floor’)
 Inappropriate footwear
 Poor lighting
 Cluttered thoroughfares
 Insufficient fall protection devices for working at heights
 Overreaching from a ladder
 Water blasting
 Carrying equipment on stairs
Dangerous goods
 Reaction of incompatible chemicals (acids and alkaline cleaners or
sanitisers)
 Chemical burns to skin and eyes (corrosive cleaners)
 Toxic fumes
 Poor ventilation
 Lack of information (no MSDS provided)
 Lack of signage on containers and storage areas
 Inadequate storage facilities provided (no segregation, spill
containment or spill kit)
 Unnecessary storage of large quantities of chemicals
Yes
No
You should read through the list and find hazards that apply to your workplace so that youcan
determine the risk management practices that need to be applied in each instance to protect your
welfare.
Obtaining training and advice
The keys to knowing how to operate cleaning equipment safely and correctly are to receive training in
how to do so. Employers are under a legal obligation to supply this training to you and also to monitor
your activities to make sure you don’t injure yourself.
This means if you don’t know how to operate an item of cleaning equipment you should:
45
o Ask you supervisor to show you what to do
o Watch a more experienced person operate the item – and ask them what to do
o Ask for formal on-the-job training in the use of that item.
The techniques and skills required will vary between items and range from very basic competencies
(such as sweeping and using a dust pan and brush) through to the more complex tasks (such as
operating dishwashers and pressure washers).
Where there is a need to assemble and disassemble cleaning equipment, this must be done correctly to
prevent damage to the equipment and to avoid potential dangers caused by incorrect assembly or
disassembly.
Once again, you should be provided with appropriate on-the-job training in this area. If you are not sure
what to do in order to prepare or disassemble cleaning equipment safely, ask your supervisor.
2.4. Store and protect equipment and utensils that have been cleaned ready for future use
Storing cleaned equipment
After equipment and utensils have been cleaned and sanitised, they must be stored or stacked safely in
the designated places.
This must be done so as to:
o Maintain their cleanliness for future use
o Make sure items are where they should be when required for use.
When storing cleaned and sanitised items (such as crockery, cutlery, glassware and utensils) points to
note are:
o It is a legal requirement that all utensils are stored so as they are protected from recontamination via dust (and other airborne
contamination), flies and other sources of
contaminations (such as pests, coughing, sneezing,
cross contamination) – there is little point spending
time, money and effort in getting items cleaned and
then simply allowing them to become re-contaminated
o Cleaned items must be put back in their correct and
designated place – this facilitates their retrieval for
future use, but also assists in keeping the workplace
tidy, which in itself facilitates on-going hygienic
conditions. There would appear to be a definite link
between tidiness and good food hygiene practices
o When storing items such as tubs, bowls, bain-marie
trays or any other items that will fit one inside the
other, the practice of ‘nesting’ (that is, placing one item
inside another) is to be avoided unless the items are
fully dried. Nesting items when they are wet slows
down the air drying of items, and thus increases the
chance of bacterial (re-) contamination
o Staff who store and stack items of equipment and utensils must ensure that their hands are
clean before handling the sanitised items
o Failure to immediately and properly store cleaned items and equipment may also mean that a
workplace hazard is created. This means that items left lying around may create a tripping
hazard, or other danger
46
o
The correct ‘designated place’ for storing items can include shelving and racks, cupboards,
equipment stores, drawers, specified
specified areas on benches, trolleys or being hung from overhead
hooks.
2.5 Store cleaning items and chemicals, and clean where applicable, after cleaning has been completed.
Introduction
It is important for all equipment to be cleaned after every use
before storage. This will ensure that dirt and grime from a previous
cleaning task is not transferred on to another surface, this reduces
the possibility of cross contamination.
It also means the items of cleaning equipment are ready for
immediate use should
ld there be a need to use them in the event of
an emergency.
Putting cleaning items back in their designated location also means
that other staff are able to access them when they need to.
Storage of cleaning equipment
After cleaning all equipment should be dried and then placed into a secure environment that allows
them to be clean the next time that they are required.
Generally, all equipment has a designated storage area. Before equipment can be stored away, it should
be checked to ensure it is clean and
d ready to be reused as outlined above.
It is important that equipment is stored in a clean condition and in the right location for a number of
reasons, some of which may include:
o So that equipment can be quickly and conveniently located
o So that equipment
nt can be reused straight away
o For stocktaking purposes.
Storage of Chemicals
Chemicals are important within the kitchen environment. Chemical are not to be ingested by the public
in their food.
Storage of these chemicals in a safe environment is very important.
There is a need store chemical away from the food production area as part of your Food Safety Plan
(FSP).
The correct storage of chemicals is of the utmost importance. Storage areas must be prepared with the
appropriate drainage, safety equipment, fire sprinklers and the correct firefighting equipment. They
must also have good ventilation.
Access to these stores should be restricted only to staff who have received appropriate Occupational
Health and Safety (OHS) training in handling chemicals.
chemi
What are the general requirements?
Any undiluted chemicals remaining on your cleaning trolley or in your cleaning bucket must be stored
safely at the end of the shift/cleaning task.
House policies will determine whether these chemicals need to be stored
stored in the chemicals store or if
they can be returned to the cleaning storeroom.
The following guidelines need to be considered when storing chemicals:
o Keep in a storeroom away from other products – the room should be marked ‘dangerous
goods’, have necessary
sary HAZCHEM signage, and restricted access
47
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
2.6
A register should be maintained to record items in accordance with legislated requirements
The store room for chemicals must be well lit and ventilated
The room should only be used for storing chemicals
Heavy containers must be stored on lower shelves to avoid the need for lifting, and to minimise
the chance of spills
Keep containers well sealed and labelled
Have MSDS and first aid directions posted in the area – together with first aid resources to
support possible treatment requirements
Keep away from a naked flame or excessive heat
Product usage charts should be close to the chemicals for easy and clear reference purposes –
including details relating to dilution, items that chemicals can be used on
Instructions for safe chemical handling must be posted – to provide instruction on decanting
chemicals
Necessary PPE should be present – gloves, aprons, respirators, gauntlets, hoses, etc.
Never store chemicals or cleaning agents in food containers
Never store chemicals with food
Do not allow customers to come into contact with chemicals, or entry into the chemicals storage
area
Never mix chemicals together – some may explode
Ensure measuring devices for chemicals are not used for any other purpose.
Error! Reference source not found.
Introduction
Working in kitchens is by nature a dangerous job. The most common injuries are burning and cutting
followed by slips tripping and falling.
Emergency first aid is vital.
Emergency first aid related to cleaning is also necessary.
It can be caused by:
o Slips on wet floors
o Burns from hot equipment
o Skin burns by contact to skin by cleaning chemical
o Chemical burns internally caused by breathing in fumes from
cleaners and solvents
o Falling equipment that has not been stored properly.
Procedure to follow when aiding a person who has been injured
o Look before you do anything, do not put yourself in harm’s way
o Make sure what has caused the injury is isolated or the injured
person can be moved away from cause of injury.
This will vary:
 Hot stove burn, move patient away from stove, run cold water over affected
area to relieve pain and take heat out of affected area
 Person slips on wet floor, make sure you have proper footwear that will
reduce possibility of you slipping on floor before you go to aid of patient.
Then ascertain the extent of the injured person before you try to move them
48



Call for assistance if needed, some things you cannot handle on your own, ask others to do
things that need to be done
Your establishment may have designated ‘first aid officers’, they will need to be notified: what is
the telephone number?
Do you need to call ambulance of fire department? Fire department will need to be called if
there is a fire or dangerous gasses in the environment.
ADMINISTERING BASIC FIRST AID FOR MINOR CUTS, BRUISES, ABRASIONS, BURNS AND SCALDS
Basic first aid for minor cuts
If the person has cut themselves, the first thing you need to do is to control
the blood loss.
This is just a matter of applying pressure to wound.
Check to see if wound is clean:
o If yes, apply bandage and keep dry
o If not, wash with water to flush the wound the best you can then apply
bandage or dressing. Send patient to higher level medical care facility,
first aid station or doctor.
Basic first aid for Major Cuts
Apply pressure to wound and elevate to stem the flow of blood where possible. Keep pressure on
wound until higher advice is available. Tourniquet may need to be applied.
Basic first aid for Burns and Scalds
Standard practice is to flow cold water over the affected area for 20 minutes. This will relieve the pain
and take heat out of the wound.
If pain is not relieved then the person needs to seek medical advice.
Do not apply ice to affected area as ice will burn skin more and do more damage.
Bruises from falls
Apply cold compress to affected area to reduce swelling. Do not apply frozen gel packs directly to areas
as this ‘ice’ temperature will burn skin.
Wrap in cloth material and allow cold to penetrate through cloth to ease affected area.
Seek higher medical advice if needed.
Abrasions
Make sure the wound is clean and no foreign objects are still attached to skin. Apply some sanitising
cream and cover with light breathable covering to protect the wound.
Chemical burns on skin
Move patient away from chemical and flush affected area with cold water until medical help can be
accessed.
49
Work Projects
It is a requirement of this Unit you complete Work Projects as advised by your Trainer. You must submit
documentation, suitable evidence or other relevant proof of completion of the project to your Trainer
by the agreed date.
2.1 You are working in a kitchen and are asked to list all your cleaning needs:
 Make a list of 6 pieces you think you require
 Supply price of each piece of equipment
 How often these pieces of equipment will need to be cleaned.
2.2. List utensils needed to clean this cleaning equipment.
2.3 Develop a cleaning schedule for your kitchen:
 What is to be cleaned?
 Who is to clean
 When are they to clean?
2.4. Show how you will store this equipment:
 Supply your requirements for storage.
50
Summary
Prepare for cleaning duties
Identify the equipment and utensils that may require cleaning in a kitchen premises environment
and the frequency of cleaning for each identified item
A Food Safety Plan (FSP) is the first thing that needs to be presented to the local authority when
making application to operate a food business in Victoria.
A Cleaning Schedule must be part of this FSP. It will identify:
 All equipment that will need to be cleaned
 All equipment that will need to be cleaned
 How they are to be cleaned
 Who is to clean them
 When they are to be cleaned
 What is to be used in the process of cleaning
 Any occupational health and safety procedure that need to be followed when cleaning
procedure is being implemented.
Select appropriate cleaning utensils and chemicals
It is the enterprises decision to what quality of cleaning chemicals and cleaning equipment that
they are going to be using.
 The best quality or the more budget priced products
 The better the quality the easier the cleaning
 The end result should be the same.
They will make equipment and utensils safe to use to produce food fit for human consumption.
Implement cleaning procedures in accordance with enterprise and legislated requirements
The cleaning schedule will indicate the time of day areas are to be cleaned. What is more
efficient for the business is not always the most convenient.
 Does cleaning have to be done at night?
 Does it cost more to employ staff at night?
If all cleaning is done at night, are there staff to do emergency cleaning during the day?
How many people will be involved in the cleaning? What equipment is available to carry out the
cleaning procedure?
Store and protect equipment and utensils that have been cleaned ready for future use
Cleaning Equipment and Utensils are important to carry out the cleaning process. Loss of this
equipment is detrimental to the efficiency of the operation.
Utensils will need to be replaced as they wear out and some have a short life spa.
Equipment might be larger and more expensive to replace.
All cleaning products need to be protected from accidental breakage and pilfering by staff or
theft from outside the enterprise.
Security of cleaning equipment and utensils is important. Special storage areas need to arranged
and secured to prevent such losses of equipment.
While there must be easy access to these areas it is important that these areas can be secured.
Store cleaning items and chemicals, and clean where applicable, after cleaning has been
completed
Utensils used in cooking need to be clean when they are to be used next so should the cleaning
equipment and cleaning utensils.
This makes for ease of use and also minimise the possibility of contamination of the food.
Helps to minimise any staff injuries incurred from picking up containers that are contaminated on
the outside with the caustic chemical contained in the container.
51
Follow emergency first aid procedures in the event of a cleaning-related incident or accident
Using cleaning chemicals make the job of cleaning kitchen equipment easier and more efficient.
Some chemicals are corrosive when coming into contact with parts of the human body.
While care must be taken when using chemical everybody must be aware of FIRST AID
procedures when working with these chemicals and must know what is to be done when
exposed to the cleaning chemicals.
What is the chemical?
What precautions that must be followed when using these chemicals?
What is the first aid procedure?
3 PERFORM BASIC MAINTENANCE ON KITCHEN EQUIPMENT, UTENSILS AND
PREMISES
3.1 Perform basic premises maintenance activities as necessary
Introduction
Basic premises maintenance may include:
o Tightening loose fittings
o Replacing minor items that are damaged, that pose a food safety or
other risk, or which pose a threat to operational effectiveness
o Replacing light globes, tubes, starters and covers, as required
o Replacing torn or damaged fly screens
o Taking short-term remedial action to prevent a dangerous or substandard situation, from worsening.
o Contacting the relevant person/department to effect
professional repairs, as required.
Many establishments use a maintenance schedule to provide regular
preventative maintenance for nominated pieces of equipment.
This means that all the items covered by such a schedule are routinely
checked to ensure they are in good working order, and any required
maintenance is performed to prevent break-downs: the idea of this approach is to stop a
problem/breakdown happening in the first place.
By contrast, many establishments do not implement scheduled maintenance.
In addition, some equipment may need maintenance between scheduled maintenance.
Why is this of a concern?
Routine maintenance is undertaken to:
o Keep the items in full operational condition
o Keep items safe to use.
3.2
Re-make bed using existing bed linen
Introduction
Equipment used in the kitchen gets old, breaks and becomes dangerous to use as well as potentially
contaminating food being processed on the premises.
52
What is involved?
All routine maintenance must be undertaken according to planned, preventative maintenance
programs.
This may include:
o Wiping down and cleaning – you must realise that basic cleaning of equipment is a prime
preventative maintenance activity: many breakdowns are a result of nothing more than a build
of dirt and debris over time
o Washing and rinsing of items – such as mops, brooms, cloths
o Sanitising – essential for minimising the transfer of bacteria
o Drying out – when items have been cleaned you will need to either hand dry the items or leave
it to air dry
o Dismantling and reassembling – electrical items will often need to be dismantled before they
can be effectively maintained and then re-assembled: manufacturers of items will provide
detailed advice of what needs to be done in this regard
o If you can’t find the manufacturer’s instructions contact the supplier for a replacement set of
instructions, or check their website – many suppliers include this sort of information on-line
o Emptying items – basic maintenance for items such as vacuum cleaners and other items that
incorporate a vacuuming function must be emptied as a routine maintenance activity
o Changing filters – in vents over stoves.
Day-to-day maintenance
In addition to routine maintenance functions you are expected to also address maintenance issues that
occur on a day-to-day basis.
While you are not expected to be a qualified service technician, you are
expected to take whatever action is within your ability and is necessary to:
o Fix things on-the-spot
o Prevent further damage to an already faulty item.
The actions that can achieve these aims are:
 Having a look at the item and determining, if possible, what is
causing the problem – some electric items will have warning lights
that can indicate what the problem is, or whereabouts the problem is
 Taking whatever action you can to remedy the situation without
placing yourself at risk and without doing further damage or causing
further problems
o this can include turning electrically-powered equipment off before doing anything and then
removing debris that is clogging an inlet, causing the problem

Checking log books for the machine – some machines require basic maintenance based on the
‘run hours’ of the item

Reporting problems to your supervisor or the Maintenance department where your efforts are
unable to rectify the issue you have identified.
53
Introduction
Identification of faults
Staff are partially responsible for identifying faults with cleaning equipment,
and reporting these faults in accordance with enterprise procedures. Storing
equipment provides an excellent opportunity to look for faults.
The procedure to report faults will vary from establishment to
establishment.
It is generally the maintenance department’s responsibility to check and fix the item however there are
a number of general rules for dealing with identified faults:
o Equipment should be removed from service as soon as a fault has been identified
o Equipment should be labelled clearly and obviously ‘Out of Service’
o Equipment should be stored in the appropriate ‘Out of Service’ area
o Appropriate ‘Report Fault’ paperwork should be completed and submitted
to the appropriate person or department.
Some faults may have to be repaired off-site – which may involve returning the
item to the supplier or forwarding it to an accredited repairer. In extreme cases, a
new item may have to be purchased.
When major repairs are required, management may elect to buy a new item
instead of repairing the old one.
Where repairs have been made on an item, it is important for this item to be
monitored in case the repairs prove to be ineffective and the establishment may
be able to claim under some form of warranty or guarantee.
Work Projects
It is a requirement of this Unit you complete Work Projects as advised by your Trainer. You must submit
documentation, suitable evidence or other relevant proof of completion of the project to your Trainer
by the agreed date.
3.1 Make a list of 6 basic maintenance activities that you may be required to do in the kitchen
3.2. Develop a checklist of the steps required in performing this basic maintenance of kitchen
equipment
 Include in this list tool you may require to carry out basic maintenance of this kitchen
equipment.
3.3. Supply a maintenance request sheet that will outline maintenance need when you report
maintenance needs to manager
 Name of equipment that need maintaining
 Where the equipment is situated
 Importance of maintenance (high/low).
54
Summary
Make beds
Perform basic premises maintenance activities as necessary
The premises that are used to produce foods needs to be in good repair.
Are the tiles on the floor coming loose?
 Water can build up under these tiles and cause more damage.
Replacing minor items that are damaged, that pose a food safety or other risk, or which pose a
threat to operational effectiveness, some can be minor others major.
Replacing light globes in cool room, replacing torn or damaged fly screens on windows.
Taking short-term remedial action to prevent a control being kept within the production area will
be effective in reducing long term damage done if these tasks are not carried out.
Perform basic maintenance activities on equipment and utensils as necessary
Following manufacturer’s instructions in relation to on-site basic preventative maintenance.
Keep such things as filters clean, replace washers as they wear out. Seals on cool room doors get
dirty and split during cleaning. Screws and nuts and bolts become loose with usage so constant
checking needs to be in place to minimise impact of these problems occurring.
Report maintenance requirements that cannot be satisfactorily addressed
Contacting the relevant person/department to effect professional repairs, as required. This is
good management procedure that will reduce impact of breakages and downtime of said
machinery.
Reporting items that are dangerous and/or which are unable to be repaired/maintained in-house
will help to reduce on costs if people are injured due to lack of maintenance.
Some businesses want to reduce cost by avoiding the costs of implementing these good
management procedures but at the end of the day it will cost the company more if they injure or
kill people whist on their premises. Customers or workers.
Good maintenance saves money in long term.
4 HANDLE WASTE AND LAUNDRY REQUIREMENTS
4.1
Clean bath and shower area
Introduction
This Section looks at the legal requirements in relation to
waste disposal and the possible internal requirements that
might apply to this common workplace activity.
Hygiene regulations
Health laws require management to supply sufficient garbage
receptacles to cater for whatever garbage is produced.
If the rubbish is scattered all around the existing bins, and it is
flowing over the tops of bins, it is deemed that there are
insufficient bins.
55
The garbage area must also be kept in a tidy condition as well as clean.
The idea of keeping the garbage area tidy is to try to minimise the potential of providing harbourage for
cats, mice, birds etc.
In general there is a requirement that garbage be stored in such a way as to minimise contamination.
Consideration may be given to the use of garbage ‘cool rooms’ where food refuse is stored under
refrigeration prior to removal from the premises. This helps control odour problems and infestation by
rodents but this is not a legal requirement.
Remember that keeping things ‘clean’ includes keeping them ‘free from odour’ and this is an especial
concern in relation to garbage areas, bins etc.
Local councils get many complaints form next door neighbours complaining about the smell coming
from the rubbish area of the food premises next door.
Frequency of disposal is very much an individual concern, and the use of commercial companies to clear
garbage may well be required.
Attention should be paid to increasing garbage pick-ups during peak trading periods where extra food
rubbish is generated.
All garbage bins must be in ‘good condition’ and must be fitted with tight-fitting lids which must be kept
in position so as to provide protection against vermin gaining access to the rubbish.
Enterprise practices/procedures and environmental considerations
Recent sensitivity to environmental concerns has resulted in many premises modifying their standard
operating procedures in order to be more responsible in terms of waste creation and disposal.
A central theme to the concept of responsible waste management has been to encourage businesses to
‘Reuse, Reduce and Recycle’.
‘Reuse’ encourages the use of a product more than once before it is
discarded.
‘Reduce’ ask people to generate less waste by thinking more about what they
buy and what they use.
‘Recycle’ suggests that products can be re-made into something else. Reuse
and Reduce fall outside the thrust of this Unit, but sorting and disposal of
waste definitely embraces ‘recycling.
Current waste management practices may include the sorting of waste into the following categories in
order to facilitate recycling:
o Paper, including cardboard and newspapers
o Plastic, including soft drink (PET), milk, juice and cordial bottles
o Glass, including bottles (clear, green and amber), jars and clear sauce bottles
o Steel cans, including food cans and aerosol cans
o Aluminium cans, including aluminium foil
o Milk and fruit juice cartons.
As a general rule, items for recycling should be cleaned (washed or rinsed) and flattened ready for
collection.
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Each category of recyclable waste should be stored in a separate container for ease of pick-up, and to
promote ease of processing.
It is fair to say that some establishments apply a high level of
environmental conscientiousness when it comes to dealing with
waste, and others do relatively little.
Premises should always check with their local council to identify any
local requirements that might apply.
It is often forgotten that garbage bins are required by legislation to
be cleaned, but it is true. They must be regularly cleaned using
brushes and utensils dedicated solely to that task. This usually
involves using some form of degreaser to cut through the grease,
and a deodorant to control smells.
Plastic garbage bags are a common method of keeping the bins themselves clean, however bulk rubbish
units (dumpers, for example) will need to be hosed out with hot water and detergent.
Even where you use the bin liners, you cannot rely on them totally to keep the bin clean, so some
cleaning will have to be done.
If you use dumpers provided by an industrial cleaning company, the responsibility for these dumpers
remaining ‘clean’ is yours – if the company supplying the dumpers won’t clean them, then you have this
responsibility.
Also remember that food handlers are legally required to wash their hands after handling rubbish.
Types of internal waste
Internal waste may include:
 Food waste
 Liquid waste
 Chemical waste
 Fats and oils
 Food wrapping, including containers, cartons, plastic material, bottles, jars and glass, cans,
aluminium-based products, recyclable materials, paper and cardboard
 Waste matter from departments serviced by the kitchen.
Once garbage has been collected from the room, kitchen, it must be transported safely to the
appropriate garbage location, usually a dump master.
Near the dump master there may be a number of recycling stations– paper, plastics, cans, etc.– and as
much garbage as possible should be recycled.
Protective clothing should always be worn when handling or disposing of garbage.
Chemicals are different to garbage and should be treated as such.
Standard requirements
Garbage must be disposed of regularly – it must never be allowed to accumulate inside the premises: a
minimum requirement is to remove all garbage on a daily basis.
In addition:
 Comply with any recycling protocols the business has:
 Make sure all rubbish goes into the bins – and is not left lying around next to them
 Close lids to bins after using them – there may be a need to lock them to prevent unauthorised use
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

Use the appropriate bin/disposal system for the appropriate type of rubbish – liquid waste will be
separated from solid waste
Wash hands after handling rubbish.
Requirements relating to disposing of chemicals
When cleaning, handling and disposing of chemicals, the following points should be adhered to:
 Chemicals should never come in direct contact with the skin – always use/wear PPE
 When spilt, chemicals should be initially soaked up with sand, earth or some kind of designated
absorbent material.
Safe disposal of chemicals
Left-over chemicals in undiluted form must never be disposed of down a sink or a gully trap.
State and local laws address the environmentally friendly and safe disposal of chemicals by requiring
them to be:
 Taken to designated collection sites
 Collected by specially licensed collection businesses.
Chemicals should only be poured down drains that are
fitted to chemical traps:
 Never assume a drain leads to a chemical trap.
Where you are unsure about the requirements for disposal
of chemicals, contact your local council for relevant local
requirements. They will give you advice as to how to
comply with current relevant legislation.
Chemicals must not be poured down stormwater drains in
order to prevent pollution of the environment (and avoid
the risk of fines and adverse media attention.
4.2
Clean toilets
Introduction
The broad nature of the requirement ensures that it is applicable to all types of food premises and the
different types of garbage and recyclable material that are produced.
Disposal areas
The word ‘facilities’ is intended to include all the areas and equipment used in connection with garbage
and recyclable material storage. It includes: outside storage areas where bins are kept:
 Garbage rooms
 Refrigerated garbage rooms
 Garbage chutes
 Bins, hoppers and other storage containers whether used outside the
buildings or in food handling areas; and
 Compactor systems and the rooms in which they are housed.
‘Garbage and recyclable matter’ includes food waste, paper, cardboard, glass,
metal (whether recycled or not) and any other waste material produced by
the business that has to be stored before it is removed.
Food premises must have facilities for the storage of garbage and recyclable matter that:
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e. Adequately contain the volume and type of garbage and recyclable matter on the food premises
The standard requires all the garbage and recyclable material to be contained. This means that the
waste should be in bins, hoppers, wire cages or other containers that are appropriate for the type of
waste. For example, paper can be stored in hessian-like material sacks and wire cages but food waste,
which may leak liquids, must be placed in impervious containers.
The containers must be large enough or in sufficient numbers to contain all the waste produced by the
business while awaiting the next waste removal from the premises.
The outside area or room that houses the containers must also be adequate for the volume and types of
waste. There is no requirement to use refrigerated garbage rooms although this may be necessary for
some businesses to prevent putrefaction and odour problems.
f.
Enclose the garbage or recyclable matter, if this is necessary to keep pests and animals away from it;
and
The garbage and recyclable matter must be enclosed if this is necessary to keep pests and animals away
from it. The subclause is not intended or designed to prevent nuisances from litter or to prevent
scavenging by people.
The intention is that containers that are in open air storage areas must have tight fitting lids in order to
keep flies and other pests away. However, lids on containers used in food preparation areas are not
specifically required. Lids inconvenience kitchen staff and handling the lids could pose a risk of food
contamination. Lids may also not be necessary on containers in sealed garbage rooms because pests
should not be able to access the garbage.
Recyclable material that does not attract pests but will afford harbourage, such as dry cardboard, can be
baled, kept in an enclosure and removed regularly.
g. Are designed and constructed so that they may be easily and effectively cleaned
This requirement applies to the area where the waste is stored and to garbage chutes, bins or other
containers used to hold garbage or recyclable matter.
Businesses should not have to go to the expense of providing external
garbage areas (with associated drainage, reticulated water, etc.) if the
current arrangements are not posing a food safety risk. However, if there
are other issues, such as environmental problems or the type of waste
necessitates it; businesses may need an external garbage area under other
legislation.
If premises have a garbage room, the floors, walls and ceiling they must be designed and constructed in
a way that enables them to be cleaned. For example, floors may need to be graded and fall to a floor
waste if the room is hosed to clean it.
They must not, as far as practicable, provide harbourage for pests. For example, walls should be smooth
and free of cracks and crevices where insects could hide.
Garbage rooms are part of the premises and therefore have to comply with the requirements for
sufficient ventilation and lighting.
There is no requirement that garbage containers or garbage areas must be sanitised.
There is no food safety justification for sanitising because food should not be in contact with the
containers and hands should be washed after handling the containers if the next handling job could
transfer contamination from the containers to food.
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Washing containers thoroughly with detergent and water should remove residues that are likely to
attract pests.
Handling food for disposal
A food business must ensure that food for disposal is held and kept separate until it is:
 Destroyed
 Used for purposes other than human consumption
 Returned to its supplier
 Further processed in a way that ensures its safety and
suitability; or
 Ascertained to be safe and suitable.
What is meant by ‘food for disposal’?
A food business is required to hold and keep separate ‘food for disposal’ until it is assessed.
Food that is immediately assessed and determined not to require holding does not need to be
identified.
 For example, if food that is found to be mouldy is immediately disposed of, the food does not need
to be identified because it is not being held.
However, if the food business needs to keep the mouldy food, for example to return it to the supplier,
the food will need to be kept separate and identified.
‘Food for disposal’ that needs to be held must be separated and identified
so that it is not accidentally sold or used.
A completely separate storage area is not required but these foods should
be kept away from foods for sale:
 For example, foods that need to be held and kept separate may be
placed together on one shelf in a refrigerator or dry storage area.
The business may also choose to keep these foods in special containers.
The held food must be identified as returned food, recalled food or food that is or may be unsafe or
unsuitable.
Food for disposal must be held and kept separate until the business has decided what to do with the
food
These are discussed below.
h. Destroyed or otherwise used or disposed of so that it cannot be used for human consumption
The business may destroy or dispose of the food in some way. This may also be the business’s only
option if the other options do not apply.
Food would usually be disposed of by placing it in the rubbish. However, if large amounts of food need
to be disposed of, special arrangements may need to be made. The business should liaise with the local
enforcement authority if large amounts of food are to be disposed of at the rubbish tip. The
enforcement authority may require this food to be destroyed in some manner before it is dumped, to
prevent it being pilfered from the tip and resold or used.
The food may be able to be used for purposes other than human consumption, for example animal feed.
i. Returned to its supplier
Food may also be held, separated and identified for return to the supplier. Examples of circumstances in
which food may be returned to the supplier include:
 Food that is subject to recall
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 Incorrect orders or deliveries; and
 Food that has deteriorated or perished within its stated shelf life.
Cleaning chemicals can be harmful to the environment so there are certain rules that need to be
followed when disposing of them.
Disposing of cleaning chemicals
From time-to-time
time there may be a need to dispose of cleaning chemicals. This may occur when:
 Chemicals have become dated
 Containers have lost their labels and you don’t know what’s inside so the
business elects to dispose of the product rather
rat
than risk guessing at what it is
 You change suppliers and elect to start this new relationship by throwing out
any existing product and beginning from a set date using all new products
 You decide to discontinue using a certain product because it isn’t
isn’ performing
as expected
 There has been a spill and you need to get rid of the product that has been
cleaned up.
This disposal of chemicals must be done safely and according to environmental conditions – this means:
 Cleaning chemicals must not be poured
poure down the sink/gully trap
 Cleaning chemicals must not be thrown out with normal rubbish.
Recent environmental considerations mean that chemicals must be disposed of in
an environmentally sensitive way.
Many Councils will have special ‘domestic chemical runs’ to facilitate the safe and
environmentally responsible removal of chemicals from households conducted by
licensed personnel under strict control protocols.
Some – but certainly not all – Councils may
may also have a similar ‘commercial chemical run’ from time
time-totime. Contact your local Council to see what their approach, and advice, is where you have need to
dispose of neat chemicals.
All this may sound a bit over the top for the disposal of some cleaning chemicals but be warned it is the
law to dispose of such substances properly.
4.3
Clean vanity area
Introduction
Dirty linen may include:
 Uniforms
 Cleaning cloths, tea towels
 Table linen
 Linen from departments serviced by the kitchen.
Process dirty linen may include:
 Sorting into designated types and piles
 Identifying and marking stains
 Notifying the laundry of laundry requirements by type and quantity
 Transporting dirty linen to the laundry
 Returning clean linen to the kitchen.
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Part of the role of cleaning and maintaining kitchen premises may be to sort waste and dispose of it
according to hygiene regulations, enterprise practices and procedures, and environmental
considerations.
This Section looks at the legal requirements in relation to waste disposal and the possible internal
requirements that might apply to this common workplace activity.
Work Projects
It is a requirement of this Unit you complete Work Projects as advised by your Trainer. You must submit
documentation, suitable evidence or other relevant proof of completion of the project to your Trainer
by agreed date.
4.1 Supply waste disposal requirements of your local/ state government regulations:
 What needs to be separated?
 What can be recycled?
 How often refuse will be picked up?
4.2. Develop a cleaning schedule and management guidelines for the waste storage area:
 Are storage bins to be colour coded?
 When can refuse be stored in this area?
 What control processes are to be put in place to maintain cleanliness in this area?
4.3. Develop protocols for the collection and processing of laundry needs:
 What happen to soiled linen?
 Who is responsible?
 How often this process is to be carried out?
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Summary
Clean bathroom
Dispose of internal waste in accordance with enterprise and legislated requirements
All businesses generate waste. Food businesses generate more than some. The majority of the
waste generated by food business is organic and is non toxic in the short term.
After time this non toxic waste becomes toxic to human health so it is important that it is
disposed of in an organised and efficient manner.
All food businesses need to follow instructions and requirements of the local government
authority in the disposal of waste that is generated by their business.
Re-usable materials also need to be organised and processed. Laundry needs to be managed
when soiled as it becomes hazardous to human health if not cleaned after use.
Maintain waste disposal area in a clean and sanitary condition
They are where waste is collected and stored prior to disposal and also the area that is most
likely to become contaminated quickly through over use and poor maintenance.
Cleanliness here is as important as elsewhere and in some way s more important as this area
collects ALL waste before it is disposed.
Gather dirty linen from kitchen and associated departments and process dirty linen
Kitchens generate a lot of soiled materials. Modern practices have lead to the usage of new
paper based products that alleviate the need to many items used in the kitchen and restaurants.
But there is still a need to gather material that is to be laundered, t-towels, cleaning clothes,
serviettes, table clothes, staff uniforms etc.
Organised collection will give greater control over these items and minimise the impact of them
harbouring bacteria and attracting vermin and pests.
GALLEY Cleaning tools and equipment
Cleaning tools and equipment used in a kitchen to clean equipment can include:
Clothes
Towels
Abrasive pads
Brushes
Spray bottles
Scrapers
Sponges
Grill cloths
Paper towel
GALLEY Cleaning agents / chemicals
Cleaning agents / chemicals used to clean equipment in a kitchen may include:
Detergents
Oven cleaners
Combi-oven cleaners
Dishwashing detergents
Sanitisers
Grill cleaners
Glass cleaners
Rinse aids
Degreasers
Multi-purpose cleaners
Cooktop cleaners
Descalers
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HOUSEKEEPING DEPARTMENT
GENERAL PUBLIC CLEANER AND CABIN STEWARD
HOUSEKEEPING UTILITY/CLEANER/STEWARD
JOB DESCRIPTION
KEY ACCOUNTABILITIES
• She/he is responsible for maintaining the standard of cleanliness in all public areas assigned
to him/her including officer and crew areas.
REPORTS TO
• The Housekeeping/Cleaner reports directly to the Housekeeper
SUBORDINATE PERSONNEL
• None
AREAS OF RESPONSIBILITY
• She/he assists in the handling of linen and with general laundry work.
• She/he cleans passengers, officers and crew areas according to the established cleaning
procedures.
• She/he assists in storage and luggage handling whenever requested.
• She/he takes care of any side jobs assigned to him/her.
• Big earrings and big necklaces are not to be worn on duty and more than one moderate size ring
is not acceptable.
• Smoking is not permitted while on duty.
PERFORMANCE OF DUTIES
• The Housekeeping/Cleaner will report to work at the prescribed starting time.
• Passengers should be greeted at all times in a friendly manner.
• The cleaning must be of the highest standard and be strictly in accordance with the routines and
instructions set by the Housekeeper.
• She/he cleans (once a day) the Master's, Chief Engineer's and Hotel Manager's cabins.
• She/he cleans all other Officer cabins once a week.
• She/he returns lost and found items to the Purser's Office and includes date and location of
where article was found.
• She/he takes special care when handling Company equipment and working material
• She/he attends meetings and training sessions called by his/her Superior.
• This Job Description does not encompass all details but is meant to be used as a general
guideline, especially for new crew members.
APPEARANCE/PERSONAL HYGIENE
• The appearance of the entire personnel on board the ship reflects the reputation and image
• of the Company; therefore a great deal of emphasis is placed on a professional appearance.
• The Company expects you to maintain the highest standard of personal appearance and
• hygiene at all times.
• If in passenger areas full uniform is to be worn: hat, scarf, jacket, name tag, pants and proper
shoes.
• Have a clean neat personal appearance.
• Special attention to grooming, hygiene care and clean and proper uniforms and shoes.
• Hair must be well groomed, neat and not extend over the shirt collar and always be kept clean.
• A moustache is acceptable if kept neatly trimmed.
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DAILY ROUTINES FOR HOUSEKEEPING/CLEANER
The duties of the Cleaning crew will be scheduled by the Housekeeper and the following routines are to
be met:
• Vacuum all staircases and landings
• Vacuum and clean all elevators
• Vacuum behind all fire doors
• Vacuum elevators twice daily or more often, as traffic dictates.
• Clean elevator door tracks daily and polish once a week.
• Wash and/or polish elevator walls and doors daily
• Wash portholes once a week from the inside. Remove smudges and finger prints when
necessary.
• Control and shift ash urns at least eight times a day
• Dust directional and exit signs twice a week
• Mop and/or buff vinyl and other hard surface floors
• Clean, dust and remove spots from all bar stools, chairs and sofas
• Dust light fixtures
• Vacuum under all cushions
• Clean and dust all table tops in the bars, lounges and lobbies
• Clean all windows
• Clean and polish glass doors on both sides and dust behind rails
• Clean and dust bar counters, walls and lights above bars
• Clean and dust all art pieces
• Check and clean all air conditioning outlets, ventilators and loud-speakers
• Clean and wash down frequently all ceilings
• Clean all walls and remove finger marks
• Clean and dust on top of boards, thoroughly clean and re-arrange rest rooms at least four times
a day, including:
o Washing of hand-basin, toilets, urinals
o Cleaning of tiles
o Empty trash cans
o Clean mirrors, sinks, bright surfaces and floors
o Replace paper products as necessary
o Clean walls
o Vacuum upholstered furniture and dust all chairs
o Clean dance floors and remove shoe marks
o Polish all brass
o Clean and polish all public telephones
o Clean the information desk including all officeso Polish all display boxes
o Following requirements are to be met in public toilets:
o Empty all waste baskets
o Empty and wash all ash-trays
o Scrub toilet bowl and urinals inside and outside
o Clean toilet seats on both sides
o Wash all doors on both sides and check frames for dust
o Wash all walls around toilets and urinals
o Wash hand-wash-basin inside and outside
o Polish all mirrors
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o
o
o
o
Scrub the floor
Clean all drains
Remove rust
Fill up toilet paper, hand-towels and soap
Cleaning of Offices
• All offices are to be cleaned daily by the Housekeeping Department. The cleaning should
• include the following steps:
• Vacuum all carpets daily
• Empty waste-baskets and wipe the outside and inside with damp cloth
• Dust desk top and other furniture. Once a week, apply furniture cleaner and polish
• Empty and wipe out ash-trays
• Clean porthole ledges and door frames once a week
• Clean walls, ceiling and doors
• Clean air-condition outlets
Important: Use the correct cleaning material. Report any repairs needed in the described
areas and follow up on this matter
CABIN STEWARD/ESS
JOB DESCRIPTION
KEY ACCOUNTABILITIES
• She is responsible for maintaining the standard of cleanliness in the pax cabins assigned to her,
including corridors, stairways and public areas.
REPORTS TO
• The Cabin Stewardess reports directly to the Housekeeper and ultimately to the Hotel Manager.
SUBORDINATE PERSONNEL
• None
AREAS OF RESPONSIBILITY
• The Cabin Stewardess will report to work at the prescribed starting time.
• She cleans the cabins according to the instructions of the Housekeeper/Hotel Manager.
• Prior to passenger embarkation the Cabin Stewardess will clean the cabins and corridors in such
a way that no trace will appear of the previous occupants.
• The cleaning must be of the highest standard and be strictly in accordance with the routines and
instructions set by the Company and the Hotel Manager.
• It is important that passengers are received graciously and friendly.
• A courteous verbal introduction should be made at the beginning of a cruise and the Stewardess
should acquaint each one of her passengers with the general shipboard information.
• If appropriate, she should ask passengers if they feel comfortable and be briefed on meal hours,
bar activities etc.
• She must use her personal judgment as to how much information to provide. Never discuss
internal Company matters with passengers.
• During the voyage the Stewardess will closely adhere to the working instructions and routines
set by the Hotel Manager/Housekeeper.
• She must always report passenger complaints to the Housekeeper without delay.
• She should place the appropriate information material in each cabin.
• Empty cabins must always be in order and not be used for storage purposes.
• She should greet passengers at all times in a friendly manner.
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•
Before entering a cabin, she should knock on the door and announce "Housekeeping". Do not
use the key to knock on the door, if there is no answer the cabin may be entered.
• It is essential that passengers are informed about procedures and timing of events in connection
with disembarkation.
• She should pay special attention to passengers until they have left the cabins for departure.
• After passengers have disembarked, she cleans the cabins immediately.
• Lost and found items are to be turned into the Purser's Office and include date, cabin number or
place found.
• She takes special care when handling Company equipment and working material.
• The Cabin Stewardess will take part in linen handling and looking after inventories directed by
the Hotel Manager.
• She must attend meetings and training sessions called by her Superior.
• This Job Description does not complete all details but is meant to be used as a general guideline,
especially for new crew members.
• As our Company grows, so will our need for loyal, skilled management and, therefore,
housekeeping personnel have every opportunity of promotion to higher positions.
PERFORMANCE OF DUTIES
• The Cabin Stewardess plays a considerable part in creating the image of the Company. The
Company expects her to apply her ability to create a natural friendliness and show concern for
the welfare of the passengers and to be concerned for the cleanliness and order in her areas of
responsibility.
APPEARANCE/PERSONAL HYGIENE
• The appearance of the entire personnel on board the ship reflects the reputation and image of
the Company; therefore a great deal of emphasis is placed on a professional appearance.
• The Company expects you to maintain the highest standard of personal appearance and hygiene
at all times.
• If in passenger areas full uniform is to be worn: hat, scarf, jacket, name tag, pants and proper
shoes.
• Have a clean neat personal appearance.
• Special attention to grooming, hygiene care and clean and proper uniforms and shoes.
• Hair must be well groomed, neat and not extend over the shirt collar and always be kept clean.
• A moustache is acceptable if kept neatly trimmed.
• Big earrings and big necklaces are not to be worn on duty and more than one moderate size ring
is not acceptable.
• Smoking is not permitted while on duty.
DAILY ROUTINES FOR CABIN STEWARDESS
Following requirements are to be met in the cabins:
• Empty, clean and wash all waste baskets
• Remove all soiled linen
• Replace all used glasses
• Check walls and dust all baseboards
• Make up beds neatly and according to instructions from the Housekeeper
• Change linen twice a week or when necessary
• Check that pillows and pillow protectors are neat and spotlessly clean
• Check that bed pads and blankets are clean free of defects or stains
• Check that area under beds is clean and free of any articles
• Check that bedspreads are clean and straight o Check that headboards are dust free and clean
• Check that picture frames are dust free and picture glass spotless
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•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Check that drapes are clean free of dust and stains and properly hung
Dust window sill
Polish curtain rod
Check that cabin is free of insects
Vacuum carpets, chairs and sofas and check that they are free of spots, rips or loose edges
Check that desks, drawers, lamps and bulbs are free of marks and dust
Check that the cabin is free of stale or unpleasant odors
Check that air conditioning grill is clean and free of dust
Check that ceiling is free of watermarks
Check that the mirror and frame are clean and free of finger prints
Clean dressers and cabinets
Arrange information material properly
Check that closets and shelves are free of dust
Check that clothes hangers are arrange properly
Clean and disinfect telephones
Empty and wash out ash-trays
Check condition of ash-trays and waste-basket
Polish door and safety handles
Polish bottle opener
Remove spots of rust
Polish all brass
Clean and treat all wood
Report anything out of order promptly to the Housekeeper
Following requirements are to be met in the bathrooms:
• Check that ceiling is free of water marks
• Clean wash-basin and mirror
• Clean tiles, no water marks or soap film on edges of soap dish
• Wash out and polish glasses, if used o Disinfect wash-basin
• Clean and polish water faucets
• Clean bathroom floor, walls and ceiling
• Place washcloth and bath mat according to specifications
• Sort out damaged towels
• Check that towel racks and bars are clean and free of hand or water marks
• Fold and hang towels according to instructions from the Housekeeper
• Replenish bathroom supplies
• Check that toilet-bowl is clean and free from odours, waste marks or stains under edge and
outlet clean
• Check that toilet-seat and hinges is clean free of stains or marks and disinfected
• Replenish toilet paper and Kleenex
• Fold end of toilet paper in triangle
• Scrub and disinfect shower floor and walls
• Check condition of shower curtain and hooks and make sure shower curtain is clean free of any
soap marks
• Clean inside of shower head and shower hose o Clean and dust light fixtures
• Check that light switches are free of dust and finger prints
• Check that the top of the door is clean and free of dust
• Empty and clean waste basket
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•
•
Clean pipes under the counter
Report anything out of order promptly to the Housekeeper
Lost Items
• To be brought immediately to the Front Desk with a note of cabin or place found, Date and time
found and finder’s name
CLEANING SPECIALIST
 Description:
Position Summary: As Facilities Cleaning Specialist, you will be serving with a world-class team.
You will be responsible involved in the overall public/crew areas cleaning function onboard the
vessel, focusing primarily on quality of operations. In addition, you will have the opportunity to
travel the world while working for a top global employer of choice.
 Responsibilities:
Supports the Facilities Manager in the general administration. Supervises the public/crew areas
cleaning function with a staff of Cleaners, Pool Attendants, and Horticulturists. Manages the
assignment of duties, responsibilities and workstations to employees. Observes and evaluates
employees and work procedures to ensure quality standards and service is met.
 Mentors, develops and provides on-the-job training to subordinates to strengthen their current
performance and preparation for future advancement as well as executes directives deemed
appropriate by the Facilities Manager. Utilizes and administers the disciplinary action process
through coaching and counseling to improve performance or termination of employment.
 Reviews financial transactions and monitors budget to ensure efficient operation, and to ensure
expenditures stay within budget limitations. Reviews working hours and overtime to maintain
the efficiency of the operation without exceeding budgetary constraints. Reviews requisitions
estimates for product replacements, supplies, purchases, etc. and forwards to the Facilities
Manager for final approval. Actively seeks out opportunities to reduce costs while maintaining
standards of quality and service.
 Monitors all cleaning processes in the public and crew areas. Inspects cleaning preparation to
maintain quality standards and sanitation regulations with regard to public areas. Monitors the
care, use and maintenance of all equipment, machinery, supplies, etc. for the facility function.
Completes all hygiene sanitation logs and ensures all USPH procedures pertaining to the
Facilities cleaning function are followed according to the regulations.
 Supervises the operation of the H20 Zone, Adult Pool Deck, and all open deck spaces.
 Provides and monitors the Guest Service Standards on open decks, including the supervision of
the cleanliness and maintenance of open decks, enforcing GVP, monitoring the Deck and Chair
and Towel Programs, and monitoring the venue music on all open decks. Works with the Cruise
Director, F&B Manager, Facilities Manager and Staff Captain to coordinate all open deck
operations to ensure an optimum guest experience and safety in the open deck areas.
 Works with the Cruise Director, F&B Manager, Facilities Manager and Staff Captain, and Bosun
to coordinate the scheduling of opening, closing, cleaning and maintenance of all pools, Jacuzzis,
solarium, open deck areas.
 Understands Flow rider and Sports Deck policies and procedures.
 Manages the luggage handling process during embarkation and debarkation.
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HOUSEKEEPING DUTIES
1 RECEIVE HOUSEKEEPING REQUESTS
1.1 Accept housekeeping requests from guests
Introduction
Housekeeping is an important area in any accommodation property.
Most people see housekeeping as simply ‘cleaning guest rooms’ but from an operational perspective
there is a lot more to housekeeping than just that.
The role of housekeeping is to ensure the comfort and safety of guests whilst they are staying at a
hospitality organisation.
This is the guest’s 'home away from home'. It is essential that that a guest is able to enjoy their room in
the same manner and with the same ease as they would enjoy in their own house. The aim of
housekeeping is to strive to enable guests to access items as easily as in their own home.
It is therefore important that housekeeping staff maintain a professional level of integrity, especially
staff who clean rooms. Housekeeping staff must have high levels of integrity, honesty and discretion as a
guest needs to feel that what takes place or what is left in their room must be safe and remain
confidential.
Understandably an accommodation room is considerably smaller in size than the customer's normal
residence and therefore items that they may need might not be in immediate access.
A hotel cannot provide all the necessary items a customer may need inside each and every room for a
number of reasons:
 The room size is too small
 It would become cramped for space
 Not all customers need all items
 The capital outlay for a business would be considerable
 It reduces the chance of damage and theft.
 Therefore it is vital that housekeeping are able to get a requested
item to a room in the shortest possible time.
Types of accommodation properties
The items included in a room or upon request differ depending on the type of accommodation provided.
Housekeeping requests by guests can be made across a range of accommodation properties for a wide
variety of reasons.
A housekeeping department exists in any property that
offers in-house accommodation.
Housekeeping departments operate within:
 Hotels, motels and clubs
 Resorts, chalets and hostels
 Passenger ships and trains
 Serviced apartments.
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Types of guest requests
There may be many times during a shift when the room attendant will have to handle guest requests
and the reasons can vary.
Need for item sent to the room
A guest may request services or products such as:
 Additional equipment in their room – because they have needs during their stay that are not
accommodated by the normal in-room items
 Valet or laundry service – common among long stay guests
 Additional bedding – where the existing bedding is unsuitable, uncomfortable or insufficient
 Extra tea, coffee, sugar and milk sachets – a common request where the guests spend a lot of
time in their room
 Extra crockery or cutlery – where the room features a kitchen or kitchenette this is also a
common request especially where guests want to entertain in their rooms
 Vases – for flowers that have been delivered to them
 Replacement items such as hair dryers, toasters, irons and electric jugs to
replace items that are not working
 Extra bathroom guest supplies – another common request for long-term
guests: guests with long hair often ask for extra shampoo and conditioner
 Additional items in compendium – such as letterhead paper, envelopes,
postcards, pens, note paper
 Additional towels – to accommodate extra showers or baths taken by the
guests: where the property has a swimming pool this is a common request
 Extra hangers for clothes, extra pillows, extra blankets
 A power conversion board – to adapt their electrical equipment to the
power supply of the venue: common where the property caters to
some international guests
 Ice and ice buckets.
Servicing of room
 Rectification cleaning - guests may request an improvement in the servicing of room. They
require housekeeping staff to provide remedial service to the room when the original room
service is deemed by the guest to be sub-standard
 Clean-up after an in-room party or entertainment
 A special room service where they have spilled something on the
floor.
Repairs
 Repair or removal of broken equipment – such as controls for the
TV, DVD player, air conditioner, broken bedside lights, freestanding lamps
 Instructions to enable them to work equipment – such as the TV, in-room safe, lights (especially
where room cards are needed to activate the power to a room), heating and cooling controls.
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Lost and found
Guests may also contact housekeeping when making a Lost and Found enquiry. They may have found an
item in a room they have just been roomed in or they may contact housekeeping after they have
departed to enquire about something they have lost.
Housekeeping is often the department that operates the Lost and Found facility for a venue because
most Lost and Found items come from guest rooms.
Handling complaints
Ensuring guest comfort may relate not just to issues that can be handled quickly by housekeeping (such
as rectification cleaning, a replacement jug for one that’s not working or extra tea and coffee supplies)
but also handle or direct guest requests relating to:
 Noisy people in the room next doors
 Poor views from the balcony
 Noisy pigeons outside the room which stop guests getting to sleep
 Noisy elevators near the room
 Lack of facilities in the room
 Quality of facilities that is below guest expectations
 Advertising that has created expectations that are not being met.
In most cases housekeeping may not be able to rectify these complaints
personally, but they should ensure the appropriate person is contacted in a
timely manner.
Handling guest requests promptly
Given that housekeeping staff are usually very busy trying to achieve the
tasks set for them by the Executive Housekeeper on a daily basis (which are
essentially the servicing of departing and staying guest rooms), they must
still ensure they handle any requests from in-room guests in addition to their
allocated workload and do so in a polite and friendly manner, in accordance
with all relevant house policies and procedures.
If the room attendant cannot assist the guest immediately, they should at least acknowledge the guest’s
request and advise them when assistance will become available.
There may also be times when a guest makes a request and the room attendant cannot provide an
immediate answer as to whether or not the request can be fulfilled.
In such instances, the room attendant should seek out accurate information to satisfy the guest’s
requests, or pass on the request to the appropriate department (or the Floor
Housekeeper) for action and follow up.
The guest should always be told of how their request is to be dealt with and
kept informed about the progress of the request.
The basis for providing excellent levels of customer service in housekeeping
In order to ensure the comfort and wellbeing of guests, housekeeping must
develop a good relationship with guests.
This can be achieved by:
 Good personal presentation – as determined by house requirements
that apply to uniforms and personal hygiene
 Greeting guests by name when known
 Providing excellent service at all times
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Not giving the guests the impression that serving their needs is a chore/imposition
Not rushing service delivery as and when it is required
Enquiring “Is there anything else I can do for you?”
Finishing service delivery with appositive statement: “It’s been a pleasure”
Providing information to guests (about the property, the local area, tourist attractions,
transport, local customs, currency etc) – and not just providing service in terms of specific
housekeeping duties
 Assisting guests in public areas (such as the corridors of their floors or in lifts) or in-room when
they see them struggling with their luggage. The assistance may simply involve offering to call a
porter to assist
 Smiling
 Handling complaints in a professional manner
 Providing a safe and secure environment for the guests while they are staying in the
establishment
 Respecting the guest’s need for confidentiality and privacy
 Having excellent product knowledge about the appliances, items, features in guest rooms.
For room attendant to provide excellent service, they must know the importance of making guests feel
safe, secure and welcome while they are away from home.
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Handling guest complaints
Unfortunately, even with the best of intentions, things can sometimes go
wrong and result in a guest complaint. As identified before, some requests are
in fact complaints.
The following are guidelines to assist in dealing with a customer complaint:
 Remain pleasant at all times, but do not smile when the guest is
complaining
 Listen without interruption
 Know the correct procedure and the establishment policy on dealing
with customer complaints
 Ask the guest how they would like you to resolve the problem
 Focus on the issue and don’t take the complaint personal
 Apologise to the guest for any inconvenience
 Advise your supervisor and get their feedback as to how they feel you handled the situation.
Use guest name where possible
When dealing with a guest’s request, the room attendant should acknowledge the guest by addressing
them by their name, if appropriate and possible.
It is said that a person likes nothing better than to hear the sound of their own name.
Using the guest’s name is an excellent way of personalising the service and showing that the individual
guest is valued.
Make sure however that you follow any house policies that might apply to the use of guest’s names.
These usually reflect generally applicable standards of courtesy, such as:
 Avoid using first names – only use last names
 Never use nicknames
 Get the pronunciation right – if you are not sure you can do this, use ‘Sir’ or ‘Madam’
 If you don’t know the guest’s name or have forgotten it address the guest by ‘Sir’ or ‘Madam’.
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How will I know the guest’s name to begin with?
Most requests from guests for items for their room come about from:
 A phone call to housekeeping from the guest
 A face-to-face conversation with the guest as they are walking down the corridor and see you
cleaning rooms.
 In either situation they usually begin the conversation by identifying
themselves and the room they are staying in – “Hi, I’m Herwia Agustana
from 379. I was wondering if you could …”
 This provides the perfect opportunity to find out the guest’s name but
you have to be alert to the possibility it is going to happen and be ready
to listen for it and remember it.
 If you forget the guest’s name it is easy enough to find out a name from
the internal rooming system using the room number as the basis for the
search: where there is more than one person in the room (for example,
a twin room may have 2 males or 2 females) and you are not sure who
is who, use ‘Sir’ or ‘Madam’.
1.2 Accept housekeeping requests from staff
Introduction
Housekeeping not only services the needs of the guest. As the
department responsible for the cleanliness of a property, it is often called
upon to handle requests made by other departments.
Therefore all departments will have requests of housekeeping. Similar to
dealing with requests from guests, these requests must be handled in a
professional and timely manner.
Types of staff requests
The types of requests may be varied depending on each specific situation,
however there are some common staff requests including:
Cleaning
 Cleaning duties - of items such as furniture, carpets, equipment, windows,
floors and bench surfaces
 Cleaning of in-house facilities – including public areas, change rooms and
offices
 Emergency cleaning – unexpected cleaning requests
 Cleaning and servicing of staff changing rooms.
Staff Uniforms
 Order and supply of staff uniforms
 Providing laundry service – many properties operate their own onpremise laundry whilst other venues will use the services of an
outside commercial laundry. Most staff uniforms will be cleaned
through the housekeeping department.
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Provision of Supplies
 Cleaning products, rags & equipment
 Chemicals
 Clean linen for F&B departments
 Towels for gymnasiums.
Security
 Check rooms and floors for safety concerns
 Ensure guest room and emergency doors are shut
 Close storerooms
 Participate in emergency and evacuation procedures.
Other tasks
 Move room service trays from rooms or corridor to appropriate store area
 Check mini bars for departing guests
 Check actual status of a room – whether a guest has actually left the room or if it is occupied.
As mentioned, when handling requests made by staff, they must be handled in a timely manner. These
requests are made to help provide a better experience for guests and must be
treated seriously. All staff members are part of a team, each with a role to play.
Housekeeping has many requests for other departments and would also expect
their requests to be handled in an efficient manner.
1.3 Record housekeeping requests according to enterprise requirements
Introduction
Any contact that housekeeping has with a guest has the potential for a request to
be made by the guest.
The reality is that guests rarely speak with housekeeping staff unless they have a
need to do so, so be aware of this and be ready to respond appropriately.
Confirm and note details of the request
Confirming what is needed
The key to this is repeating back to the guest what it is they have told you they want, using your
establishment knowledge to clarify any areas that are not clear.
For example, if a guest phones and says they want more towels, you need to determine what size towels
they want. If the guest tells you they have spilled something in their room and want it cleaned up, you
should ask the nature of the spill! (what was spilled?, what it was spilled on?, and how big the spill is?)
so you can prepare for what is needed.
Sometimes the guest will ask questions about what is available to suit
their need, so you need to respond accurately and honestly to these
questions. It is important that honesty is used so that you avoid
creating false expectations in the mind of the guests.
Noting details of what is needed
The key to this is to not rely on your memory but rather to write down
the relevant details.
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This advice applies whether the request comes in person or over the phone. There should always be
note paper and a pen near the phone in the housekeeping department and a room attendant should
always have a notebook and pen as standard items when they are working.
When a guest makes a request simply write down:
 Guest name
 Room number
 Specifics of the request – type of item or service required, number involved (where appropriate
– ‘6 wine glasses’)
 Time for delivery to the room that was agreed to.
 It is always wise to confirm the details to save time, effort and guest
frustration if the wrong item or service is delivered. There may often
be communication difficulties caused by different languages, lack of
local knowledge, tiredness and unfamiliarity with the property.
1.4 Advise on time for provision / delivery of identified service or items to
guest room
Introduction
After a request has been received, recorded and confirmed, you should
provide the guest with an estimated timeframe as to when the request will be
met.
Keys to agreeing on a timeline
The timeframe for meeting any guest request must be reasonable and achievable.
It is best if the guest agrees that the time given by you is agreed too by them, but sometimes they place
unrealistic timelines that simply can’t be met. Obtain agreement where possible and where you can’t,
do your best and be as quick as you can.
Remember you will probably have other tasks to do and other guest needs to provide so the Golden
Rule is ‘Under-promise and over-deliver’.
For example, if you tell the guest the item or service they have requested will be there in 5 minutes and
it actually takes 10 minutes they will be disappointed and annoyed. If you promise the item in 10
minutes and have it there in 5 minutes, they will tend to be impressed with
your fast response.
Never allow yourself to be forced or intimidated into a timeline that you
know can’t be met. It is far better to politely explain this timeframe cannot be
met, explaining the reasons why, where applicable, and re-assuring the guest
you will act as quickly as possible.
Sometimes you don’t need agreement
In many cases where a guest makes a request for additional room servicing
requirements, they are happy to be informed “Certainly, Mr Adams. That’s
half-a-dozen extra teas, coffees, sugars and milk for Room 583. I’ll be there in
5 minutes with those for you. Is there anything else I can do for you?”
By supplying this timeframe, the room attendant is showing that the request has been taken seriously,
and is giving the guest an expectation about the service to be provided. The 5 minute timeframe may
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also take into account other things the room attendant has to do both to finish their allocated work and
meet the unexpected guest request.
However, should this timeframe change for any reason, the room attendant must inform the guest of
the progress being made with their request and supply the guest with a new revised timeframe, and the
reason for the change in time.
By doing this, the guest will then be able to adjust their expectations: they may not like the revised
timeframe but at least they are aware of it (and can plan accordingly) and know that something is being
done to satisfy them.
This will help ensure greater customer satisfaction.
If you personally are unable to action a request for guest service that you agreed to, make an attempt to
see if someone else can assist. This may mean asking another room attendant, a porter or a room
service person.
Time delays
Despite your best efforts there will probably be times when a breakdown arises in relation to services
provided by the housekeeping department.
In all instances the guest should receive an apology for this lapse in service and appropriate remedial
action should be taken immediately, where appropriate, to try to retrieve the situation to the best
extent possible.
Examples of breakdown in providing housekeeping services to rooms
This breakdown in service provision may result from:
 Sub-standard servicing of the guest room when the room was prepared –
someone may have missed cleaning an item, an area or item may not have
been properly cleaned, guest supplies may not have been re-stocked
 A previous promise to deliver a service may not have been fulfilled – a
guest who was promised a replacement hair dryer may not have been
supplied with one. The task could have been forgotten or a message for
another staff member may have been misplaced
 A room displaying a ‘Do Not Disturb’ sign and the room attendant
responsible for that room not notifying the Floor Housekeeper that, at the
end of the shift the sign was still in place and the room had not been serviced
 A promise to deliver something to a room by a certain time may not be able to be met – perhaps
the item required is out-of-stock or there are insufficient staff to meet the promised timeline
 An item that was promised to a guest turns out to be unavailable and can’t be supplied as
promised.
In essence, anything that:
 Fails to deliver the service that either we promised
 Fails to deliver the service the guest expected
 Fails to meet house service delivery standards.
 can be said to be a breakdown in service delivery and should be apologised for.
Keys to making apologies
Where there has been a delay you must apologise for this. You must be sincere in your apology but also
brief. You must make sure you apologise not only for the lack of service or item that wasn’t delivered
but you must include an apology for any inconvenience that has been caused.
The apology should never:
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Blame anyone else
Discredit the establishment
Commit the establishment to making some form of recompense or compensation.
2. SERVICE HOUSEKEEPING REQUESTS
2.1 Liaise with other staff to obtain and or deliver identified service or items
Introduction
As identified in the past section, guests or staff may have requests which must be addressed. In some
cases these tasks can be performed by yourself or within the
housekeeping department.
In many cases, in order to respond to a guest request it requires
the involvement of other people or departments.
A guest is not concerned who handles their request. Their
concern is that it is simply handled in a satisfactory and timely
manner.
The need for teamwork
On some occasions, there will be a need for teamwork and the person receiving the request for
housekeeping services may need to obtain assistance from another staff member to comply with the
request.
For example, a large spill in a room may be better dealt with by 2 people rather
than just one. A large piece of equipment or furniture that needs moving will
require a ‘team lift’ approach.
Where you feel that you are unable to fulfil the request on your own, you should
always be prepared to ask others for their help. You should also be prepared to
help others when they ask for your assistance.
Safety and security
Where you receive a request from a guest for extra service provision and the
guest appears annoyed, upset, affected by drugs or alcohol then you should
always obtain help from another staff member.
Certainly it is important to let someone know the room you are going to.
When you are servicing a room, others can tell where you are by the location of your trolley and looking
at your room chart, but when you respond to a call to take an item to a room it is impossible for others
to know where you are should you need help.
All it takes is a quick call to another staff member “Hi it’s Herwia here on the 9th floor: just taking some
extra guest supplies to Room 7010. Should be back on station in 5 minutes.”
Responsibility
Regardless if the request has been forwarded to another person for completion it is important that you
ensure that the request is actioned.
Keep track of what is happening and where required keep the guest informed of what is happening and
expected time for completion.
Once the request has been fulfilled, it is a good idea to check with the guest to ensure they are satisfied
with the outcome.
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2.2 Locate and deliver required items to guest room
Introduction
In most cases, it will be the responsibility of housekeeping to carry out any guest requests that they
receive.
This is generally fairly easy to do because moist requests relate to items that the room attendant has
ready access to – guest supplies are on the housekeeping trolley and most other things requested are
either in a Floor Housekeeping storeroom or can be ‘borrowed’ from a vacant room.
In other cases, however, some requests may involve a bit more time and effort.
“It’s not my job!”
No staff member should ever use the phrase ‘It’s not my job” when
responding to a request from a guest.
In a service industry, it is always your job to assist guests.
If the request is outside your normal work responsibility, you should:
 Record and confirm the request
 Pass the details on to the relevant person for them to action.
 Never, ever tell a guest “You’ll have to ring the Maintenance
department – we don’t handle replacing light globes” or
“Sorry, Room Service do that – perhaps if you ring 22
someone there can help you”.
Action is the key to responding to a request
 Once a request is received, you must promptly seek out the
item or equipment necessary to complete the request within
the agreed timeframe.
 The key to any request from a guest is to take action on their
request.
 To do this, you will most likely just go to your trolley (or to the
nearest housekeeping storeroom), grab what is needed and take it
to the guest room.
Passing on requests
In other cases , where the request falls outside you ability to fulfil it, the
appropriate person must be notified and the request passed on important
points when doing this are:
 Pass on all the relevant details including the name and room
number of the guest is vital. This information allows the person to
get back in contact with the guest to clarify things or amend the
promised delivery time
 Make sure the person you give the message to understands it. Get
them to repeat it back to confirm it. Make special mention of any
important bits including the need for urgency.
 Stress any agreed time that have been given. If you promised the item
in 10 minutes, you must let the other person know when that 10
minutes is up.
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Requests for information
It is sometimes more time consuming to provide certain things to guests. Requests for information are
amongst these.
Requests for information can cover:
 Information on the products and services offered by the establishment – even though guests
have an in-room compendium they can still want more detail than what is
there and there is always the possibility that this information is out-ofdate.
 Use your product knowledge about the property to answer these
questions, and where you don’t know the answer, apologise, tell them you
will find out the answer and get back to them, then do so.
 Availability of services, hours, location of meals, services and equipment –
you might be able to inform a guest that there is an ice machine at the end
of the corridor but perhaps you don’t know when the spa opens or what
the treatments are how much they cost.
 How various types of equipment works – you are expected to know how
to operate all the in-room facilities (this should be one of the first things
you are trained in as part of your on-the-job training) but guests may ask
you about other items of equipment throughout the property that you
know nothing about. This is to be expected if your are the first person
they see as they walk back to their from not being able to operate a piece
of gym equipment, not being able to get the vending machine to work.
 Requests for information about local services, attractions, transport,
shopping, entertainment, bars, places to eat. While is probably more a
reception or concierge role, once again, guests can ask you because ‘you
are there’.
In these situations:
 Never say “I don’t know” and leave it at that
 Never tell them it’s not your job to provide that sort of information
 Never tell them to look it up in their in-room information compendium.
 Never give them the impression that asking for the information is an
imposition or a stupid thing for them to do.
2.3 Setup equipment in guest rooms
Introduction
From time to time the housekeeping department may be
asked to help set up items requested by guests.
These requests need to be accommodated as quickly as
possible because when such requests are made, guests are
usually waiting to use the items.
What items might be involved?
The items that may need setting up could include:
 Table and chairs – for meetings or to assist with the provision of room service meals
 Internet connection
 Television
 DVD player
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Data projector
Portable bed
Portable cot.
In-room meetings
Guest rooms are sometimes hired by companies for business purposes to hold a small meeting make
presentations or display goods and in such instances it may be your responsibility to move furniture
around, set up tables and chairs before the meeting commences.
Directions will be given by the person hiring the room about what they want, where they want it set and
the time by which it needs to be ready.
Elderly people
Elderly people can often have problems with technologically-based items in their rooms.
They may be perfectly well able to operate their TV or DVD at home but the one in their room may be
different and they may not be able to make it work.
Don’t make them feel stupid for asking, take time to make sure they have understood what you have
told them and check to see they are able to operate it properly on their own before you leave. A call to
the room 15minutes later to check everything is fine would also be appreciated and shows evidence of
excellent service.
Elderly people may also seek your regular assistance in:
 Moving heavy items – which can include their personal luggage
 Getting items down from high places
 Obtaining things from low places
 Obtaining a wheelchair to access other facilities in the venue.
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Portable beds and cots
Setting up portable beds and cots is a task that many in housekeeping hate!
They are often cumbersome to move, and difficult to set up. Lots of injuries
have resulted from moving and setting up these items.
Where possible, it is advisable to place them into rooms and get them set up prior to the guests arriving
– so no-one can hear or see what goes on!
Tips that may assist include:
 Be careful – they bite: watch your fingers
 Practice before having to do it front of a guest – it’s embarrassing to have problems with people
looking on
 Follow the instructions
 Don’t rush
 Have an experienced person with you when you do your first one. You never know when you’ll
need help even though you’ve done loads of practice.
 It should be a standard house rule that guests are never
allowed to set up a portable bed or cot. Not only is allowing
them to do this very bad service but there is a great risk they
may injure themselves.
Know the house rules
It is important for you to be well-versed on the different types of
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equipment that need to be set up and the steps to take to actually set up the equipment in a safe,
secure and fully-operational manner.
You must also adhere to all health and safety regulations when moving items about, especially heavy
items.
You must also follow any establishment policies on setting up equipment.
Where appropriate, agree on suitable time to collect equipment
There may be times when the guest will only require an additional piece of equipment for a certain time
span – a short-term loan.
When this item is placed in the room, it may be a good idea for you to reach an agreement with the
guest about the collection time for that item.
The main reasons to identify a time for collection for these items are:
 To allow the guest to be able to plan their stay with us – it saves them wondering what is going
to happen in relation to the item: they know what’s going to and happen and can plan
accordingly
 To prevent the situation where the guest may place the item in the
corridor outside their door – minimising the chance of damage to
the item, or theft
 To give the guest space in their room – unwanted items take up
space that the guest may want to use for something else
 To allow the asset to be put back into inventory and available for use
by another guest if the need arises.
 In relation to agreeing on a time for collection of these short-term
(or other) loan items:
 The arrangement to pick up should be made as a suggestion rather
than a requirement – the central idea is to provide service not to set limitations or ‘tell the guest
what to do’
 Guests should be encouraged to contact housekeeping and arrange for an extension of the pickup time where they want the item for a longer period
 Where housekeeping staff will be off duty when the pick-up time arrives, arrangements need to
made with another department to collect the item. It is not acceptable for the guest to have to
‘put up with’ an item in their room that they don’t want there simply because we can’t pick it
up. Room service staff, porters, or staff from any department could be asked to assist.
Log books
Some establishments will have a log book to record information about when and where extra items
were delivered and when they need to be collected.
When an item is recovered from a guest room and returned to the store (or the
vacant room from where it was borrowed), this log is signed to demonstrate that
return.
The log book assists in tracking assets and making sure all rooms have their
necessary items.
2.4 Items from guest rooms as required
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Introduction
Whilst the majority of requests involve items to be taken to the room, there are times when requests
involve items being taken from the room.
These items may be:
Types of items for collection
To service a guest request effectively, you may need to pick up items from the guest room such as:
 Room features including furniture, appliances or amenities not being used
 Housekeeping items and equipment that have been left behind
 Towels, face washers and bath mats that are now dirty and need replacing
 Toilet paper, tissues and other bathroom and guest supplies that have run out
 A replacement item – to take the place of something that isn’t working
 Items that are no longer needed but which have been specially requested previously.
 Guest items requiring further action such as dry cleaning, storage or repair.
Keys in collecting items
It is vital to understand that if you have made a promise to pick something up at an
appointed time, the guest is expecting you to arrive at that time.
They have probable changed their plans, re-arranged things to accommodate this,
and are waiting: and every minute they wait past the scheduled time seems like an
hour and their level of frustration etc rises and rises. They can’t get on with what
they want to get on with until you arrive!
So make sure you are there when you said you’d be.
If you are going to be late:
 Get someone else to collect it – and make sure they do it on time
 Contact the room, apologies and arranged a revised time.
 Never just be late and fail to notify the guest.
 If the item you are picking up is heavy or awkward, take someone else
along or a trolley.
When you arrive to collect the item:
 Knock on the door and announce “Housekeeping”
 Greet the guest by name
 Apologize, if applicable
 Tell them why you are there – “I’ve come to pick up the …
 Ask for permission to enter the room
 Thank the guest for their permission to do so
 Keep your eyes and ears to yourself
 Pick up the item and walk to the door
 Apologize again, if appropriate
 Make arrangements for a replacement item, where appropriate and a time for its delivery
 Thank the guest again
 Depart the room.
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3 PROVIDE ADVICE TO GUESTS
3.1 Advise guests on services and items available through the housekeeping department
Introduction
Many guests will have direct requests and are clear as to what
housekeeping can provide.
For some guests however this may be the first time in a hotel and are
unsure what is available for use in the room.
It is your role to provide assistance and information that may be
suitable to their needs. At times the guest may not directly tell you
their need to be aware of signs that may indicate their requirements.
Items or services that may be required
The guest may require any of the following directly related to the housekeeping department:
 Additional equipment in their room
 Fold-away bed – usually stored in the housekeeping department, this bed is portable and
already made up
 Additional bedding
 Extra blankets – where these are requested it is a good idea to advise the guest that an extra
blanket is provided in the wardrobe just in case they don’t know this
 Extra pillows – as above
 Extra towels
 Hand towels
 Face washers
 Bath towels
 Floor mats
 Improvement in the servicing of room
 Room to be re-vacuumed
 Area to be re-cleaned
 Bed to be remade
 Items in compendium
 Extra stationery – determine what is needed and how many
 Bathroom supplies
 Extra shampoo
 Extra soap
 Extra shower caps
 Items for beverage making
 Extra tea, coffee, sugar and milk sachets
 Extra crockery or cutlery
 Repair or removal of broken equipment
 Electrical water jug / kettle
 Hair dryer
 Toaster
 Iron and ironing board
 Light bulb changed
 Air conditioning/heating system fixed
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Instructions on how to work equipment
Instructions on how to work entertainment equipment
Instructions on how to work heating system
Instructions on operating the in-room safe.
Advising on hotel services and items
It is quite common for guests to ask you questions whilst you are in the room handling a separate
request. As you are face to face with the guest, they may use this opportunity to ask you questions
relating to the products and services provided in the hotel.
As the ‘face of the business’ it is your role to:
 Provide information directly
 Arrange for someone more suitable to come in person to provide information
 Follow up a request including dinner reservations
 Arrange copies of information sought including maps, brochures, menus or contact information.
For most guests, they are new to the hotel and as a professional staff member you should be equipped
to provide guests with advice, information or suggestions to help make their stay more enjoyable.
3.2 Advise guests on the use of items delivered to guest room, if required
Introduction
From time-to-time you will be required to help guests use items delivered
to or already in their room.
This may be because guests have had no experience with this sort of item
or because they have no experience with the type or model of equipment
in the room.
It should be remembered that in most situations the guest is likely to feel
embarrassed at having to ask for help so this must be taken into account
when providing advice and assistance.
Keys to providing advice
The prime requirement is that you, yourself, can operate the equipment effectively.
It is imperative that you make sure that you find out how to operate all the in-room items where you
work and you have to know all the features of very piece of equipment.
In addition to this operational knowledge, important aspects of providing
advice are:
 Explain the functions and operations of all aspects of the item
that the guest wants to know about – including what all the
switches, knobs do. Note that it may not be necessary to explain
all aspects of the item. Just focus on what the guests want to
know about or be able to do
 Make sure all health and safety requirements are covered – remember the property has a duty
of care to all its guests
 Use clear terminology, simple words – stay away from jargon
 Use some simple questions to test their understanding of what you have explained to them.
Instructional sheets in different languages
Many guests will not be familiar with equipment in the room as:
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They are not the same as they use at home
They may be more technologically advanced
They may be connected to a in-room system – for example the lighting system may be
controlled by a master panel
 It is in a different language.
Regardless of why they may not be familiar with items, it is important they we are able to communicate
instructions in a manner which they can understand.
A very good way of doing this is through instruction sheets which are in different languages or use
symbols and pictures to explain how they are used.
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
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3.3 Demonstrate the use of items delivered to guest room, if required
Introduction
Whilst providing advice is very helpful in helping a guest to use and enjoy items in a rooms, quite often
you will be required to demonstrate how an item is used.
As mentioned in the previous section, quite often a guest may not speak your language and the only
way to get your message across is to demonstrate.
Whilst it is important that you demonstrate an item in a clear and concise manner, it is vital that the
guest understands the demonstration and is able to perform the task themselves.
Keys to providing a demonstration
When providing a demonstration:
 Demonstrate the operations and functions – so that guests can see what you have been talking
about
 Show the guests where the in-room instructions are – point out the instructions in the in-room
compendium, or posted on the walls of the room. If relevant operating instructions are not
available in-room, make an effort to get them from somewhere else in the premises
 Take your time – don’t rush the explanations. Be prepared to explain things
twice. Be prepared to explain things a different way, using different words
or phrases if necessary
 Give them an opportunity to try things out while you are there – to give
them confidence and to allow you extra opportunity to assist
 Encourage them to contact you again if they have further problems.
As an effective and interested staff member it is wise to ensure that the guest is
competent in the operations of items they want to use before you leave the room.
However, you may find that guests may want to practice without you watching, as they may be
embarrassed. Use your judgement when determining how much demonstration and instruction they
require.
3.4 Liaise with other staff and departments to provide supplementary advice where appropriate
Introduction
Each housekeeping staff member will be required to have a sound basic
understanding of the items in the guest room and how they operate. It is
important to remember that their role, first and foremost, is to ensure the
room is clean and tidy.
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Items
There are many items that are either located in the room or available to be sent to the room. Some of
these items may be:
 Technologically advanced such as computers, data projectors and internet access
 Mechanically advanced – such as televisions, fridges and air conditioners.
A staff member is not expected to understand the inner workings or components of all items in the
room and therefore will not always be able to demonstrate or explain how to use it.
Services
Likewise, staff members will have a basic understanding of all the items and
services provided in the hotel but will not be able to provide detailed descriptions.
In addition, many guests will require information on events or activities in the
local community which the staff member can not fully describe in detail.
Access ‘experts’ to provide advice
When guests require information which is beyond your level of knowledge or
understanding it is important that the most appropriate person is sought to
provide further information and advice.
This must be done in a timely manner. It may involve getting the ‘expert’ to:
 Come and explain or demonstrate to the guest personally or over the phone
 Providing explanation to the housekeeping staff member, who will relay the information to the
guest
 Providing information in a written format including brochures, maps, user manuals or guides.
4 LIAISE WITH OTHER DEPARTMENTS
4.1 Report malfunctions as required
Introduction
There may be times when you will come across equipment that is
malfunctioning – either not working as intended, making too much noise, is
unsafe, is damaged or not working at all.
All such equipment must be immediately tagged as ‘Out of Order’ and,
where possible and safe to do so, the item should be removed from the
guest’s room and logged at the housekeeping department as being in need of
repair.
Where possible, a replacement item must be placed into the guest room so that
required house service levels are maintained, and guest expectations continue to
be met.
Replacement items may come from storage or from a vacant room, in the
immediate short term. Sometimes a new item may be purchased as the
replacement.
Reporting malfunctions
You must do your best to immediately replace the item in the guest room by seeking a replacement
from the housekeeping department, storage or substituting one from a vacant room.
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Where the item is of such importance such as the fridge, the TV, the air conditioner or stove (in a
kitchenette situation) front office must be notified so they take the room off the board and not sell it.
If the room is occupied and a major piece of equipment is malfunctioning and can’t be repaired or
replaced immediately, the guest will have to be re-roomed (room change) to another room.
It is housekeeping staff who will have to move the guest’s luggage and belongings in such as cases, and
set up those belongings in the new room.
How might I report these problems?
The traditional ways of reporting these equipment problems are:
 Verbally – face-to-face or over the phone with the Floor
Housekeeper, Maintenance Department or the Executive
Housekeeper
 Completing a relevant in-house report form – these are pro forma
documents that detail the item of equipment, the room number
the item came from, the problem that was identified, name of
the person reporting it, date.
 Where establishments have their own in-house maintenance
department it will be the Executive Housekeeper’s responsibility
to contact them for repairs or to make a judgement call about
replacement rather than repair. It is the Executive Housekeeper’s responsibility because the
expenses will be charged against the Rooms Division.
4.2 Advise management of dangerous or suspicious circumstances
Introduction
Accommodation establishments are the setting for many illegal activities
and all room attendants must be alert for signs this is happening or may
take place.
The role of housekeeping is this regard is only to ‘report’ – it is not to
intervene, take action or put themselves in harm’s way.
Members of the public can target floors and rooms with a view to breaking and
entering. If the thief has watched their target leave the property to go on a threehour tour they know the target’s room will be ’safe’ for that period and it is a
relatively easy target.
Other guests will use their room for illegal activities that they do not want to
undertake at home.
Is the activity illegal or immoral?
Individual establishments can have different approaches this.
Most properties are not prepared to allow illegal activity and also frown on
immoral activity.
Some turn a blind eye to immoral activities deeming that what guests do in the privacy of their own
room is their business.
You need to speak to your supervisor to determine what applies where
you work and accept the position taken by the establishment. If you ever
have any concerns about differentiating between ‘illegal’ and ‘immoral’
seek guidance on the distinctions form your supervisor and be guided by
them and their experience.
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Taking action
If you notice an item that looks unusual or suspicious, or see an occurrence that is suspicious,
appropriate action should be taken immediately.
The appropriate action may be spelled out in the standard Emergency Procedures for your venue.
The action may be to:
 Advise the floor supervisor, the Floor Housekeeper or the Executive Housekeeper
 Contact venue security.
 Always adhere to workplace policies and procedures when dealing with such matters, as they
are potentially dangerous and serious.
 An unusual item or situation may include:
 A package left unattended in corridor or stairwells
 An item that is heavily bloodstained
 A package left in a check-out room
 A weapon found in a room – whether the room is a stay room or a
departed room
 Drugs – or packages thought to contain drugs
 Explosives
 Evidence of drug taking in a room – including the presence of drug paraphernalia.
 Suspicious occurrences or people may include:
 Person behaving nervously or anxiously in a corridor, stairwell, near a store room, in the guest
laundry etc
 Person in an area they shouldn’t be in – such as areas
members of the public in areas restricted for ‘Staff Only’
access
 Person using excessive force against another person
 Loud voices and swearing
 Sounds that indicate damage is being done
 Person seeming to loiter on a floor, along corridors, in public
areas
 Person asking you to let them into a room.
If you see or hear anything that is suspicious, unusual or appears illegal you should:
 Not say anything to the persons involved
 Try not to alert them to the fact you have noticed something suspicious, unusual etc.
 Try to remember as much detail as possible – write down notes when safe to
do so
 Alert the relevant person as soon as possible in such a way that others (those
involved and other guests) cannot hear what is being said.
It is rare for you to have the authority to call police so you should refrain from doing
this in all but the most extreme cases of actual or imminent danger.
4.3 Participate in planning to enhance service delivery standards and equipment
purchase
Introduction
Planning in housekeeping is just as important as in other hospitality departments.
Whilst the majority of services delivered through housekeeping as not done in direct
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view of the guest, the output has a tremendous impact on the guest, either in a positive or negative
way.
As the staff member working in the environment where the guest resides and being the contact point
for the guest, your input, suggestions and input is invaluable in ensuring that the services and products
provided not only meet the expectations of the guest, but actually exceeds them.
This requires detailed planning of both services and products. Without either of these the guest
experience is certainly compromised.
Planning Services
Improving staff knowledge, skills and attitudes
Services are commonly referred to as the output of staff resulting from their current knowledge, skills
and attitudes.
Therefore to improve the service provided, management must plan to improve each staff member’s:
 Knowledge
 Skills
 Attitudes.
Staff are always keen to learn and improve and management should strive to find out
from staff what they would like to learn to enable them to provide better service.
This training may come in the form of:
 Workshops
 Training sessions
 Qualifications and courses
 Buddy system
 Mentoring programs.
Staff have a good understanding of what they consider important to know and this must be
communicated and understood by management.
Range of services
Each hospitality organisation provides a range of housekeeping services to its
guests.
A organisation may choose to increase its range of services provided to guests. One
example of this may be the inclusion of a butler service or turndown service. If
either of these were to be introduced into an organisation, a great deal of planning
must be undertaken in terms of:
 New products associated with the service
 New equipment associated with the service
 Staff training to develop required knowledge, skills and attitudes.
Planning equipment
When it comes to planning purchases, the task to be performed by housekeeping is tremendous. The
amount of money required to prepare and maintain operational rooms and public areas is tremendous.
Whilst each operation will have their own budgets with expense items allocated to different
departments, the following are examples of purchases that housekeeping may be required to make:
Furnishings, fixtures and fittings
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It is safe to assume that in most hospitality organisations the majority of space in a hotel is allocated to
guest rooms. The capital investment to establish and maintain these rooms conservatively start at
USD10,000 a room. This is easy to see given that each room requires a
large array of:
 Furnishings – bedding, tables, couches, kitchens, televisions,
carpets, chairs
 Fixtures – lamps, mirrors, cabinets
 Fittings – lights, electrical, air conditioners.
Equipment
Once the guest rooms and other public areas has been set up they must be maintained in a operational
and clean state. Therefore housekeeping needs to purchase:
 Equipment – housekeeping cleaning equipment including
vacuum cleaners, waxing machines, trolleys
 Clothing – uniforms and protective clothing
 Chemicals – including all cleaning products and items used
to clean including cloths, rags, mops.
Therefore this section has shown the importance of planning,
especially in a department as far reaching as housekeeping, is vital to
ensure the guest enjoys their stay in the manner that was not only intended, but also expected.
PUBLIC AREA CLEANING
Glossary
Term
Explanation
Chemical
A product, normally in liquid format, used to clean a
surface
Clean
Free from dirt; unsoiled; unstained
Deodoriser
Deep cleaning
To remove, disguise, or absorb the odour of, esp. when
unpleasant
Substantial cleaning used to remove more than surface
dirt, stains and grime
Defect
A shortcoming, fault, or imperfection
Disinfectant
Any chemical agent used chiefly on inanimate objects to
destroy or inhibit the growth of harmful organisms
Fabric
A cloth made by weaving, knitting, or felting fibres
Fittings
Anything provided as equipment, parts, supply
Furnishings
Furniture, carpeting, etc., for a house or room
Furniture
The movable articles, as tables, chairs, desks or
cabinets, required for use or ornament in an area
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Term
Explanation
Garbage
Litter, refuse, junk, rubbish
Housekeeping
The maintenance of a house or domestic establishment
Hygiene
Laundry
Leather
A condition or practice conducive to the preservation of
health, as cleanliness
Articles of clothing, linens, etc that have been or are to
be washed
The skin of an animal, with the hair removed, prepared
for use by tanning or a similar process designed to
preserve it against decay and make it pliable or supple
when dry
Manual handling
The act of pushing, pulling or lifting
OSH
Occupational Safety and Health. In some countries the
term OHS ‘Occupational Health and Safety’ is used. The
concept is identical and relates to workplace safety and
health policies, procedures and practices
Policy
A rule, a definite course of action
Polish
To make smooth and glossy, especially by rubbing or
friction
PPE
Personal protection equipment
Preparatory cleaning functions
Activities to be completed before actual cleaning takes
place
Procedure
A particular course or mode of action
Public area
Safety
Trolley
Upholstery
Any location within a hotel that all customers have
access to and can use, not for the exclusive use of one
particular customer
The state of being safe; freedom from the occurrence or
risk of injury, danger, or loss
A transport vehicle used in housekeeping to move
supplies from area to area
The materials used to cushion and cover furniture
One of the basic requirements that a customer of a hospitality business
has is that an organisation is clean and tidy.
Whilst it is essential that a premise looks clean, tidy and aesthetically
pleasing, it is more important that it is actually free from dangers that
can pose a hygiene or safety risk.
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It is expected that the level and detail of cleanliness not only matches but exceeds that found in a
normal household.
It doesn’t matter what products are supplied or how great services are, if a
venue if not hygienically clean, customers will not come. Understandably
most people consider their health a primary concern.
This manual will explore in detail how to clean and maintain public areas,
facilities and equipment within a hospitality outlet.
Before we can start to discuss cleaning methods involved, it is important
to identify and discuss these three key terms:
 Public areas
 Facilities
 Equipment.
Public areas
A public space is any area within a hospitality organisation that is readily
available for all customers to enjoy.
It is different from a ‘private’ area which is for the exclusive use of a customer. The most common
example is a guest room.
What is defined as a ‘private’ or ‘public’ area will differ
between organisations, depending on the level of
access and exclusivity it wishes to place on an area.
For the purpose of this manual the following areas are
normally considered ‘public’ areas of a hospitality
organisation:
 Lobby
 Restaurants
 Bars
 Outlet shops
 Elevators
 Public toilets
 Corridors
 Gardens
 Swimming pools
 Gymnasiums
 Play areas
 Car parks.
Facilities
Facilities are aspects of products and services within these public areas.
It can include:
 Furniture commonly refers to items in the room that are movable including tables, chairs and
sundecks
 Fixtures refer to items that are attached including heaters, air conditioners and lights
 Fittings refer to taps, pipes and electrical aspects of a public space.
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Equipment
Equipment is defined as the items within the public area that are used, their by customers or staff.
Examples of equipment can used by staff include:
 Buffet areas
 Kitchen equipment.
Examples of leisure equipment used by customers include:
 Games –board games, ping pong tables
 Sporting goods – golf clubs
 Gym equipment – water tanks, weights and machines
 Pool equipment – inflatable equipment and balls
 Leisure machinery - jet skis, boats
 Playground equipment.
For the purpose of this manual, cleaning equipment used to clean public areas,
facilities and equipment will not be included in this category.
Types of cleaning equipment
The type of cleaning equipment found in businesses will vary.
Some premises have just the basics. Many establishments will have only
‘domestic’ cleaning equipment, normally suitable for homes, rather than
commercial or industrial cleaning equipment.
Generally, commercial or industrial equipment is better because it is:
 Sturdier
 Larger capacity
 Fitted with larger electric motors.
Other places boast an extensive range of the latest cleaning equipment with the ‘correct’ item for every
cleaning job that needs doing.
Essentially, the surface to be cleaned and the nature of the cleaning to be done
will determine what is to be used.
In order to make this manual more user friendly and to avoid repetition of
information, this section will include a description of equipment that is
commonly used to clean all cleaning surfaces. Each section within the manual
will identify equipment specific to a particular type of surface or cleaning
required.
Specialist equipment will be used where special situations exist. For example, a
property with a large outside area may have a motorised cleaner that is not
necessary in a small travel agency that only has internal areas that require
cleaning.
The cleaning storeroom
Cleaning equipment is usually kept in a specifically dedicated storage area. This
may be a purpose-built cleaning storeroom where equipment, utensils, cleaning
chemicals and protective clothing is kept.
Alternatively, equipment may be kept in an assortment of cupboards or other
locations around the premises as space allows.
The following gives a representative list of the cleaning equipment that the
majority of properties will use.
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Manual Cleaning Equipment
This section will explore the range of manual cleaning equipment commonly used to clean public areas,
facilities and equipment.
Equipment that needs to be correctly selected and prepared before it is used may include:
Mops
Mops may include wet mops for washing floors and dry mops for polishing and dusting, depending on
the areas to be cleaned.
Mops are generally made from cotton or cotton/polyester blends.
The three main types of mops are:
 Dusting mops – to clean skirting boards and polished surfaces
 Polishing mops – for buffing and polishing
 Washing mops – to wash floor surfaces or apply sealant to floors that have been stripped and
need to be re-sealed.
Ensure the mop head looks presentable as guests will be able to see this and may infer a lack of
cleanliness in other or all cleaning from seeing a dirty mop head. Also ensure it has been sanitised to kill
bacteria.
Brooms and brushes
Brooms and brushes can be made from a variety of materials,
ranging from straw to a synthetic coarse bristle-like material.
Their purpose is to remove dust, dirt and grime from surfaces.
They can come in all sizes and shapes, depending on the
purpose they were designed for.
These should be sufficient in number as dictated by the
establishment, clean, and sufficiently bristled.
The most common types of brooms and brushes are:
 Carpet brush
 Scrubbing brush
 Sink brush
 Silk brush
 Toilet brush
 Wall brush
 Soft broom
 Hand brush.
Not all types will be required. It will depend on the facilities to be cleaned.
A standard item is a dust pan and brush set for cleaning up small spills etc
Cloths and sponges
Cloths and sponges are used to clean a variety of surfaces.
Sponges are used for damp cleaning needs and cloths are used for cleaning,
polishing and dusting.
 They can be made from a variety of materials, but are generally lint-free.
 They are used with a cleaning agent.
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Some cloths are made from material and some are disposable/paper-based.
Buckets
 Buckets can come in a variety of shapes, sizes and styles and are generally made from either
galvanised steel or plastic.
 Some buckets have wheels for ease of mobility, others only have a handle.
 Buckets are used to hold water and cleaning agents.
 Mop buckets feature rollers to remove excess water from the mop head prior to use.
 Cleaning equipment also normally includes some smaller plastic bucket-type containers used to hold
cleaning materials, cloths, and chemicals etc. which are and used to carry items around and into
rooms.
 Buckets may be required for wet mopping and most room servicing trolleys will also feature a
couple of plastic bucket-type containers used to hold cleaning materials, cloths, chemicals and used
to carry items into a guest room
 These should be fully operational, not leaking, easy to operate, and not smelly.
Garbage receptacles
Nearly all cleaning tasks will require you to gather and dispose of debris,
rubbish, waste etc so most cleaning tasks will necessitate the use of some form
of waste receptacle.
The ‘receptacle’ may be:
 A solid item –such as a bin
 A disposable plastic bag – usually heavy-duty
 A bin liner placed inside a garbage receptacle that is built-in to a
cleaning trolley.
All bins need to be cleaned to maintain the ‘clean’ image that every business wants to project. Just
because they are bins doesn’t allow you to let them get, or use them when they are, dirty.
Protective gloves
A good supply of disposable gloves should be available to all cleaning staff.
Specific house requirements in relation to individual Occupational Safety and
Health (OSH) issues may require other, more substantial protective clothing
(including gloves) be worn.
It is standard procedure in all premises that cleaners wear protective gloves
when cleaning and handling chemicals.
Warning signs
These are safety signs used when a public area is being cleaned to:
 Warn customers of the danger or when nominated back-of-house areas are being cleaned
 Warn staff, delivery drivers, repair people who are on the premises.
It may be standard procedures that they are displayed whenever cleaning duties are being undertaken,
regardless of location and regardless of the type of cleaning.
Personal protective equipment
Employers are under a legal obligation to supply necessary protective clothing and equipment to staff
when it is appropriate as part of the response to an identified workplace risk/hazard.
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Staff are under an obligation to wear and use this equipment and clothing when required and as
instructed.
Protective clothing and equipment is rarely acceptable as the total response to a
risk/hazard.
The industry sometimes uses a term to describe the safety equipment that is
available to staff. The term is ‘PPE’ which stands for ‘Personal Protective Equipment
and clothing’.
PPE that needs to be used for a job must be supplied and maintained by the
establishment – you are not required to provide your own.
PPE may include:
 Overalls, jackets and aprons (material aprons and PVC aprons)
 Thick rubber gloves, PVC gloves, gauntlets
 Cotton glove inserts
 Breathing apparatus
 Waterproof clothing and footwear/rubber boots
 Eye protection, safety glasses
 Enclosed shoes and steel-capped boots
 Safety hats/hard hats, headwear and helmets
 Goggles and face masks
 Uniform to be worn – which can include long trousers, long-sleeved shirts
 RCD devices – see below
 Where staff are required to work outside in the elements, PPE can include sun hats/broad
brimmed hats, sun glasses and sun protection as well as rain coats, warm clothing.
Remember, PPE must be used when and where required by your
employer. It is not optional.
Dust pan
A dust pan is vital to collect dirt, dust and rubbish.
Electrically Powered Equipment
The majority of businesses use either industrial or commercial
cleaning equipment, but the use of domestic items is also common.
Industrial or commercial items have stronger motors, larger capacities, are more sturdily built.
Vacuum cleaners
Whatever the shape, size or style of vacuum cleaners, their job is to suck up dust
and dirt off floor surfaces and drapes.
Most vacuum cleaners have a variety of attachments designed for specific
purposes (such as crevice nozzles).
Vacuum cleaners are available in wet or dry types.
Dry vacuum cleaners can only be used on dry surfaces and to suck up dry material
and not liquids.
Wet vacuum cleaners are designed to suck up liquid spills and can be used for wet
cleaning of carpets.
Double-check that the vacuum cleaner you intend using is designated as a ‘wet’ vacuum cleaner before
using it on liquids: some vacuum cleaners are dual-purpose and can be used on wet or dry surfaces.
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‘Back pack’ vacuum cleaners are used in many situations where it would be difficult or time-consuming
to use a machine that is pulled along the floor – such as when vacuuming between tables and chairs. A
backpack style cleaner also reduces tripping hazards (although the cord still presents a hazard unless a
battery-powered unit is being used).
Some companies refer to vacuum cleaners as ‘extractors’.
Carpet shampoo machines
Carpet shampoo machines can also come in a variety of shapes, sizes and
styles.
As their name suggests they are used to shampoo, dry-clean or steam
clean carpeted surfaces. They may also be referred to as ‘extractors’.
Remember that carpets may be damp or wet after being shampooed (or
steamed), so this needs to be taken into consideration before cleaning
high traffic areas, both in terms of how the area will look and smell, and
from a safety viewpoint.
All carpet shampoo machines must be used in accordance with the
manufacturer’s instructions.
Companies that supply vacuum cleaners usually also supply these
machines so check out the sites for ‘vacuum cleaners’ listed above as well
as:
Polishers
Also known as ‘burnishes’ these machines are used to polish or ‘buff’
floor surfaces – such as polished floors.
Polishing a floor helps resist scratching and enhances appearance.
They come in different sizes to enable access and time-effective
polishing in small as well as large areas.
Some include a suction facility that sucks up dust particles during the
polishing process: where these exist, filters need to be changed as
recommended by the manufacturer, or as readings from equipment
gauges dictate.
Scrubbing machines
Scrubbing machines can be used to remove debris from hard surfaces
such as tiles and concrete, sealed floors, carpet and other areas such as escalators, entrance matting
and travelators.
One main use of a scrubbing machine is where hard floor surfaces need to be
stripped and then re-sealed.
Note that different pads which are normally colour-coded are available for use
on different floor surfaces where a variation in stripping level is required. Red is
the buffing pad.
Many are integrated with a sweeper which can save time when using the
machine by also cleaning up the scrubbed off material.
They are available in a variety of shapes, sizes and styles including walk-behind,
‘pedestrian’ and ride-on models.
They may be electrically-powered or battery powered.
Floor machines
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Many machines are available that combine the functions of different machines.
These can be referred to as ‘floor machines’.
The one machine may, then, have the capacity to:
 Scrub
 Polish
 Strip
 Shampoo.
Equipment Complementary Items
Depending on the items required in public areas, it may be the role of the cleaner to ensure that the
customer has necessary supplies to use these public areas.
Toiletries
There are items that need to be replenished in public area rest rooms and include:
 Toilet paper
 Tissues
 Sanitary bags
 Rubbish bags
 Soap
 Hand towels – cloth or paper
 Shampoo and conditioners.
Towels
 Beach towels for the pool
 Towels for public showers.
Replacement items
This can include:
 Batteries to replace worn or stolen batteries in remote control units.
 Light globes to replace lights.
Most properties will get the Maintenance department (or porters) to replace any
globes or starters that are in ceiling light fittings.
Check that all equipment is clean and in safe working condition prior to use
Before using any item of cleaning equipment it must be standard
practice to check to make sure the item is safe to use, and is in a clean
condition.
Manufacturer’s instructions will explain the safety needs regarding
individual items such as electrically operated and battery-powered
machines but many basic checks apply across all items.
Importance of checks
Checking is important for a number of reasons:
 To avoid mixing chemicals from equipment to equipment. This
may damage not only equipment but the surfaces that the chemicals are being applied to
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To avoid transferring dirt or grime from one surface to another. It is a standard requirement that
all cleaning items must themselves be cleaned
To stop transportation of bacteria from one surface to another. The
cleaning items, including mops, used in food areas will not only need to
be washed but will also need to be sanitised as well
To avoid accident and injury arising from the use of equipment that is not
in safe working order.
What do I need to check?
 The checks will depend on the item being checked. Safety and cleanliness
are prime considerations but you also need to make sure the item itself is
ready and able to do the job you expect it to do.
 The following is indicative of what you need to check:
 Equipment does not have any jagged parts, edges that can cause injury
 Damage to equipment has not affected its operational safety
 Check and clean the exterior of cleaning equipment – to enhance presentation and project a
positive image for the company when seen by patrons. Cleaning equipment must be clean itself
 Ensure mop head looks presentable - customers will be able to see these if you are working in
public areas and may infer a lack of cleanliness in other parts of the establishment
 Buckets should be free of leaks, not smelly and have secure handles
 Check and clear around the rollers on mop buckets to avoid the build up of debris and fibres
from the mop
 Items to be used need to sufficient in number – you need to have enough cleaning cloths,
disposable gloves etc to get the job done
 Items must be appropriate for task – many instances of damage or injury
have resulted from trying to complete a cleaning job without the right tools
 Make sure all necessary attachments for vacuum cleaners, polishers and
other equipment are taken with you before leaving the cleaning store to
enable you to complete the intended task. This saves time and effort
 All electrically-powered and battery-powered items must be used strictly in
accordance with manufacturer’s instructions. If you don’t know how to use
an item either read the instructions or ask an experienced staff member to
show you what to do
 A standard check with any piece of electrical equipment is to ensure the electrical cord is safe to
use – not frayed or broken and with no wires exposed
 Make sure any battery-operated equipment is adequately
charged before using it. Low battery power can adversely affect
cleaning performance and causes time loss when the job has to
be interrupted to remedy the situation.
Preparing work area
Minimise customer inconvenience
Even though cleaning is a very important task, it must be undertaken with some sensitivity.
Just because it is important does not give us permission or the right to do it when and as we please.
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Common sense must be used when scheduling and performing cleaning tasks. You cannot simply go
ahead regardless, if cleaning would create an unsafe situation for patrons or staff, or if it would provide
a major inconvenience to people or the operation of the business.
As an example, automatic doors are usually cleaned at night or at another low traffic time to minimise
inconvenience to people.
This concept means that we have to be flexible when cleaning. If we have been instructed to clean a
certain area, that is traditionally quiet or unused at that time, and we find it busy and full of customers,
then the cleaning has to be deferred and rescheduled.
Not only is there a safety issue involved here, but there are also guest comfort and inconvenience
factors that demand attention.
Cleaning always requires you to think before acting.
Two things to think about are timing and site availability factors.
Consider:
 Can the job be completed before the area is needed?
 Are there enough staff to handle the job to get it done on time – if relevant?
 Have you got the right chemicals and enough of them to allow the job to be started and finished
without interruption – the more interruptions there are to the cleaning process, the higher the
chance that we will inconvenience someone?
 All the supervisors, clients and users are happy for the intended work to
proceed?
 Never just assume you can go ahead even when given a job card.
Always check first.
 Cleaning activities are normally timed to occur, for the most part, when
public activity is at its minimum.
There will always, however, be times when cleaning must be done while people
are in the area. This may be a regular pattern of events such as the on-going
cleaning of public areas such as reception lobbies, swimming pool areas or
caused by particular one-off circumstances such as functions, special events.
In essence, most other activities will take precedence over cleaning. While one hopes for mutual cooperation and understanding in the workplace between staff, this usually translates into cleaners
needing to stop what they are doing so that other work can go ahead.
Commonly this means that you may be unable to start or complete a
certain activity such as sweeping or mopping a floor, and that you will have
to move on and clean the toilets and car park and then come back to do
the floor.
When cleaning you must always strive to keep the interruption and
disruption caused to anyone to an absolute minimum.
Cleaning duties can disrupt customers:
 As a result of noise caused during the cleaning activities
 By providing a physical obstruction to them when they are moving about
 Through unwanted interruption to their activities in the room where you are cleaning.
Cleaning duties can disrupt the work of other staff and the operation of the business:
 By not being completed by the scheduled time – meaning that a department isn’t ready when
expected leaving staff standing around waiting for you to finish
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When cleaning staff and cleaning equipment are present in areas when other staff are trying, or
preparing to, deliver service to patrons
By not accommodating unforeseen operational issues into the sequence in which areas are to
be cleaned, or into the extent of cleaning to be provided. For example:
o A dining room due to be cleaned at 9:30PM is still full of in-house guests who are dining
there, spending well and enjoying themselves. Go ahead and do other cleaning duties
now and return at 11:00PM to do the dining room
o A lobby area due for a full clean is found to be teeming with 300 check-in guests who
have just arrived with their luggage on several buses. Just do a spot clean, empty the
bins and tidy things up. Leave the vacuum cleaning and scheduled cleaning of the drapes
until tomorrow.
You can further minimise interruption or disruption by:
Observing ‘Do Not Disturb’ signs on guest rooms if you are cleaning them
Keeping noise to a minimum when moving around any accommodation area, function room or
area being used for a meeting or conference
Conversing quietly with other staff and guests. Only converse with patrons when they initiate
the discussion
Keeping trolleys and cleaning equipment out of high traffic areas.
Identify hazards
 Before an area can be cleaned it must be assessed and prepared and cleared of any items and
hazards.
 This must be regarded as standard operating procedure
when undertaking any cleaning task
 A hazard can be defined as a source of danger.
 Assessing the cleaning task to be done is the first step in any
cleaning job.
 Assessing the job means taking a quick look at the area to be
cleaned and determining things like:
 Can I do the job now? Should I do the job now? Or does it
need to be re-scheduled for one or more reasons?
 Have I got all the equipment and all the chemicals and
cleaning agentsI need to do this job, or do I need to go and
get something else now that I have seen what is involved? There is no point starting a job and
having to leave it half-way through while you go and fetch other items that are needed
 Do I need extra staff, or can I do it on my own or with the staff I already have? Where time is
critical there can be a need to get extra staff to assist
 What special challenges does this job present, if any? Does it have to
be done by a specific time? Are there special cleaning standards etc
that need to be applied to this job? Are there any cost limitations in
terms of material or labour?
 What hazards are present in relation to this job? Are there special
dangers inherent in this job that make it different than normal or
which present special threats?
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Hazards
In terms of cleaning duties and considering the dangers present in the cleaning work site, hazards may
include, but are not limited to:
 Spillages of food and liquids or all types
 Breakages of packages, individual items, glass containers
 Wet or slippery surfaces – which may include from natural
elements
 Broken or damaged furniture
 Fumes
 Blood, human waste, needles/syringes, and surgical dressings
 Used condoms
 Sharp objects including syringes, knives, blades and skewers
 Broken glass – from windows, glassware, mirrors
 Fat and oil
 Heated/hot utensils and surfaces
 Sharp food scraps such as bones and crustacean shells.
Note that the time of day and the physical location of the area to be cleaned can also form part of the
threat/hazard matrix that may need to be assessed.
For example, entering a remote part of the property on your own at 3:00AM may be deemed
dangerous, but doing so at 1:30PM may be quite alright. This highlights that many cleaning jobs are
subject to unusual hours when there are fewer members of the public around and there is a higher
incidence of illegal activity.
All areas must be cleared of hazards before cleaning can commence.
Some basic procedures
When preparing to clean an area the following should be applied where
necessary:
 Never take chances if you think you may harm or injure yourself,
another person or property. Never start a cleaning job if you are
concerned for your personal safety. You should also immediately stop
any cleaning job where you believe a danger exists
 Make sure you have all the necessary equipment and materials before
you start to do the job properly and completely. Some jobs such as
stripping and re-sealing a floor can’t be stopped and started
 Move items that pose a hazard, that might get damaged during the
cleaning process or get in the way of the cleaning process and slow the
job down. Items that may need to be moved or removed may include
guest property as well as enterprise assets
 Where items have to be moved to allow the cleaning to be done, the
items that have to be moved must be removed to a place that doesn’t
cause them to become hazards such as tripping hazards, obstructions in
their own right somewhere else
 Ensure the security of any items that have been moved. Keep them insight, keep them behind locked doors, put them out of temptation’s way
 Replace items that have been moved when the job has been completed
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Lock doors where necessary to maintain security – if you had to unlock a door at night to enter a
bar, a room then you should lock that door again once you are inside. This is not so much to lock
yourself in, but to lock potential offenders, thieves, etc. out
Turn off alarms when entering an alarmed area.
Reparatory cleaning tasks
Most cleaning jobs can be seen as comprising four separate parts:
 Preparing the area
 Setting-up equipment and materials
 Doing the job
 Cleaning up/finishing up after the job.
The cleaning-related tasks that can be seen to be part of the preparatory process
prior to ‘actual’ cleaning can include:
 Moving the cleaning equipment and materials into a position that will
enable them to be readily used – close to the job but not interfering with
the work that needs to be done
 Walking over the area and picking up any loose rubbish – papers, discarded boxes, large items,
by hand and putting them into a rubbish receptacle
 Sweeping the area – to remove dust. In some cases ‘sweeping’ may be the entire cleaning job
that needs to be done but in many cases, sweeping can be seen as a preparatory task for others
jobs such as wet mopping, stripping etc
 Setting up or assembling any equipment that needs to be put together
 Mixing any chemicals or preparing chemicals and cleaning agents that will be needed
 Deciding where to start the job, the physical direction the work will take and where the job will
conclude. This is often vital with cleaning tasks because you often don’t want to walk over
surfaces that have just been mopped, re-sealed etc and you have to make sure you don’t trap
yourself into a corner. Working from the furthest point back to the entry door is a usual work
direction.
Barricade the work area or place safety warning signs
Extreme care must be exercised when cleaning any public area.
There is always the potential for a guest or staff member, to be injured as a result of the cleaning: this is
not just a bad public relations outcome, but it can mean a lengthy and expensive court case that also
causes negative relations with the wider community.
One way of limiting the possibility of guest or other injury is to barricade the work area or put in place
appropriate warning signs every time cleaning is undertaken. This applies equally to front-of-house and
back-of-house areas.
Signage and barriers serve three purposes:
 They warn people of danger – reducing the risk of injury due to
slipping
 They help keep people away from the work area – which allows us to
work unimpeded and keeps their feet off surfaces that need to dry
 They are evidence that the establishment has discharged its duty of
care obligation to others.
Failure to display these warning signs, etc provide guests and staff with a
ready-made legal case should they fall, trip or otherwise become injured as a
result of the cleaning being carried out.
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The courts have left us in absolutely no doubt that we are wholly and solely responsible for and worker
safety. We have a duty of care to maintain a workplace that does not pose a risk to people, and where
we breach that duty and injury results, we can expect severe penalties.
The need to barricade or use appropriate signs for every cleaning job cannot be over-emphasised. All
too often, cleaning staff become complacent and fail to barricade the area adequately, and this always
seems to be the time when an injury occurs.
When barricading an area, common sense must be applied. If there are too many people in the area,
then, as already mentioned, cleaning has to be deferred and done later.
 Barricades and signage must be put in position before any cleaning begins.
The following points should be followed with reference to barricades and safety signs:
 ‘Slippery When Wet’ signs must be used when mopping or working with a slippery surface –
there must be sufficient of these signs to provide suitable and adequate warning to anyone who
may enter the cleaning area from any direction. They must be sufficient to be ‘readily visible’
 During cleaning, ‘Cleaning in Progress’ signs should be posted as a warning to patrons and staff
in the same way that Slippery When Wet signs are posted
 Physical barriers (fluoro-tape) and physical restraints (purpose-built safety barriers) may be used
to restrict access to a site
 Locked doors are another practical way of denying access to areas and rooms
 Your workplace may have other signage that they require you to erect when cleaning is being
done – often the signs that are available will depend on the company from whom they were
bought.
To find out what applies:
 Ask your supervisor
 Read relevant Work Instructions, Job Safety Analyses, or Standard
Operating Procedures (SOPs).
Use equipment correctly and safely
All cleaning equipment should be used correctly, and only used for the purpose
for which it was intended.
Use of equipment must be in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions
at all times: this means you must access the instructions for each item, and
take time to read the manual.
Where you are unsure about the use and operation of equipment, contact your
supervisor or the equipment supplier for advice.
There are some key points to remember when using equipment of any type or
style.
They are as follows:
 Don’t use an ordinary vacuum cleaner to soak or clear away liquid – you
must use one that is classified as a wet vacuum cleaner
 As soon as a fault has been identified it must be reported – not only is this
a genuine safety concern, but it may also impact on the effectiveness of
the item and render it less than totally efficient
 The right equipment should only be used on the surface it was designed to
clean, in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions – avoid trying to
‘make do’ with what you’ve got: if you need a special item to clean a
certain item/area then you should obtain what is needed and not ‘force’
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what you have got to do the job
 Follow manufacturer’s instructions.
Where you are unsure about how to use any item, ask your supervisor.
Employer responsibilities
Employer OHS responsibilities may include:
 Providing safety training and clear safety rules
 Encouraging a Workplace OHS Committee – the aim of the committee is to
identify areas in the workplace where changes should be made so as to
create a safer working environment: this may include upgrading
equipment, equipment training and safety matters
 Maintaining an injury register - so that accidents are logged for insurance
and monitoring purposes
 Adhering to all workplace agreements that include reference to OHS
matters, issues, protection, training, qualified personnel etc
 Providing information and written instructions in all appropriate languages
– where there are workers from non-English speaking backgrounds it is not acceptable to only
provide advice, information, direction etc in the English language. This information must also be
provided in a language that can be understood by the workers
 Providing all necessary PPE to perform the required work
 Maintaining a safe workplace for their employees and monitoring health and safety issues –
including checking and servicing of equipment and machinery which must be maintained and
must conform to relevant safety standards
 First aid must be provided to all employees when and where necessary - this covers employees
when they are coming to and from work, provided the accident is not self-inflicted or of a
malicious or wilful nature.
Employee responsibilities
OHS workplace obligations imposed on staff include:
 Working in a way that ensures personal safety, and the safety of others including colleagues and
customers – this is a legal responsibility to look after your personal welfare and includes the
requirement to avoid engaging in activities that can compromise or jeopardise the safety of
others including playing around in the workplace
 Using safety equipment strictly in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions – which
means avoiding taking short-cuts and avoiding the belief that you have found a better way to do
things
 Using all personal protective equipment and clothing when and where required and in a correct
manner – this means using items such as goggles, masks, gloves, guards every time they are
required, no exceptions
 Following all occupational safety and health regulations in-line with establishment
requirements. A fundamental for doing this is to know what these requirements are: if you don’t
know or aren’t told. Ask!
 Reporting accidents, injuries or illness to the appropriate person – so that help can be provided
where needed or appropriate action taken to prevent an accident from occurring where a
hazard has been reported, prevent a repeat event occurring, minimise damage, loss or injury
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Reporting any equipment in need of repair
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Adhering to all workers’ compensation laws and regulations – which may include:
Complying with reporting requirements in relation to the accident
Participating in Return To Work programs so that
rehabilitation can take place and a speedy return to
the workforce can occur
Not interfering or getting in the way of a person who
is trying to assist another in need.
Safe manual handling practices
Manual handling activities are the main cause of injuries in
the workplace – they include:
 Lifting – of equipment, chemical containers, cartons
etc
 Carrying – items from storage areas to cleaning
trolleys, moving items to work areas
 Pulling – boxes and cartons forward in storage areas,
moving cleaning equipment
 Pushing –trolleys and cleaning equipment.
 Key points to remember when engaged in manual handling activities are:
 Get a risk assessment done on any job you believe poses a threat or hazard – involve your
Occupational Safety and Health representatives and Committee (where applicable)
 Push cleaning trolleys and cleaning equipment; don’t pull it. It is important for you to see where
you are going
 Always stock items in their designated place on the trolley - it is best to position heavy items on
the bottom to prevent the trolley from overturning. If you are not sure where things go – Ask!
 Never lift anything on your own that weighs over 16 kg – this is a recommendation from OHS
authorities. There is no maximum weight restriction as the current approach to workplace safety
is to assess every lifting need on an individual basis and use the most appropriate technique
depending on the type of load, how far it has to be moved, the size of the load etc. Chemicals
can be delivered in drums of 25 litres and 20 kg
 Be prepared to ask for help when needed – this may be a request for help such as to do a ‘team
lift’ or a request for information. You must also be prepared to provide help when required.
Cleaning agents and chemicals
All cleaning agents and chemicals are designed to clean specific surfaces.
It is most important that the correct cleaning agent or chemical is used on the
correct surface.
Using the wrong cleaning agent or chemical on the wrong surface can destroy
the item, requiring it to be discarded and replaced.
This highlights the need for you to actually select cleaning agents and chemicals
as opposed to just using them.
Safe handling of chemicals
Whenever you are required to deal with chemicals employers are under a legal
obligation to provide you with:
 Appropriate and sufficient training and information
 Adequate monitoring and supervision
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Necessary safety equipment and protective clothing.
Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)
Employers are also required to ensure that all chemicals used in the workplace are accompanied by a
Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS).
These Material Safety Data Sheets must be kept near the chemicals, and
cover issues such as:
 Product classification
 Storage requirements
 Transportation regulations
 Safe handling procedures
 First aid.
 Any chemical users must know where these sheets are and
abide by any specific directions or cautions.
 Suppliers of chemicals are obliged by law to provide you with
MSDS for any chemicals you purchase from them.
General rules for dealing with chemicals
 Always follow the manufacturer’s instructions – this is the Golden Rule when handling, using or
otherwise dealing with chemicals or cleaning agents
 Never mix chemicals together - doing this can cause them to be ineffective, can cause them to
give off toxic fumes, and can cause them to explode!
 Read the label
 Contact the supplier or your supervisor if unsure about any aspect of using or dealing with any
chemical
 Never store chemicals with food – it is illegal to do so
 Avoid contact between bare skin, eyes, mouth etc and any chemical – this applies to direct
contact, as well as indirect contact
 Follow the specific advice on the relevant MSDS if you swallow a chemical or get it in your eyes
or on your skin
 Work in ventilated conditions when using chemicals
 Avoid contact between food items and chemicals
 Always wear the personal protective clothing and equipment provided by your employer when
dealing with chemicals
 Don’t handle chemicals until you have had appropriate
training either from a supervisor, an experienced staff
member or a representative from the company that supplies
the chemicals
 All chemicals should be stored in a designated ‘Chemicals
Store’ fitted with appropriate HAZCHEM signs
 Only use the designated items to measure chemicals to be
used – never use jugs or containers that could then be
inadvertently used elsewhere in the property for food
preparation or service purposes
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Treat the handling of chemicals with the seriousness it deserves – focus on the chemical
handling task at hand. Don’t allow yourself to get distracted. No messing about while working
with chemicals
Make sure an approved ‘Chemicals Register’ is kept on the premises.
The following table (from Work Safe Victoria) indicate the sorts of problems that chemicals can cause to
people in our industry
Hazard type
Cleaning – using
detergents & cleaning
agents in washing,
disinfecting, general &
specific-purpose cleaning;
swimming pool cleaning
& maintenance; beer line
cleaning; degreasing
tasks; oven & drain
cleaning
Insecticides & pesticides
using to control pests &
rodents; to eliminate or
control pests on flora
Who?
 Cleaners
 Grounds staff
 Housekeeping staff
 Cellar persons
 Bar staff
 Kitchen hands
 Maintenance staff
 Outside contractors
 Grounds staff
 Housekeeping staff
 Cleaners
 Maintenance staff
 Outside contractors
Effect on the human body
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Headaches & dizziness
Sleepiness
Itchiness & rashes
Nausea & vomiting
Burning to skin & eyes
Difficulty breathing
Coughing & watering eyes
Unconsciousness
Cancer & birth defects
Damage to internal organs
Respiratory tract infection
Headaches & dizziness
Sleepiness
Itchiness & rashes
Nausea & vomiting
Burning to skin & eyes
Difficulty breathing
Coughing & watering eyes
Unconsciousness
Cancer & birth defects
Damage to internal organs
Respiratory tract infection
Selecting and preparing chemicals for use
Chemicals may be delivered in:
 Liquid form – most detergents, cleaners, sanitisers, and disinfectants
 Dry/powder form – some detergents come in this dry/powder form
 Aerosol form – for pesticides and deodorisers
 Paste form – polishes.
The trend is for the one property to buy all their chemicals and cleaning agents
from the one chemical supplier. This means you may have several detergents
from this company, all of which have been designed to do different jobs.
 How do you find out which one to use for a particular job?
 Talk to your supervisor or a rep from the chemical company
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Check the FSP regarding chemicals in food areas
Read the label on the drums/containers
Check out any wall charts provided by the supplier.
Dilute properly
Read the label and use the chemical correctly.
Some chemicals will be used undiluted at all times. Some will be used neat in certain applications and
diluted in others. The level of dilution can vary depending on the type of application.
Always measure chemicals, never guess at how much you are using.
Always follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
Follow relevant work procedures
Where the employer has specific, written directions that relate to selection, preparation and application
of chemicals these must be followed.
You should be made aware of what these are during induction
and other on-the-job training.
They can take the form of:
 Job Instructions
 Checklists
 Job Safety Analysis
 Work Instructions.
Types of cleaning agents and chemicals
There are numerous industrial chemical companies in the
marketplace, and a wide variety of cleaning products available.
The brand or type used in one establishment can vary greatly to the brand or type used
in another.
Cleaning companies will work with you to identify and understand the cleaning jobs
you need to complete and recommend appropriate products with the necessary
active ingredients.
Most companies will provide you with samples to allow you to test the products
before you buy them.
Water
Most cleaning products come in a concentrated form meaning, they should be
diluted with water before being used.
It is vital that you determine whether the cleaning agent or chemical you propose
to use needs to be diluted or whether it can be used neat: damage can be caused
by using neat product when it should have been diluted.
Water is also important in the cleaning process because it is also used to:
 Loosen and dissolve dirt and grime from surfaces
 Rinse surfaces and cleaning equipment.
Remember that clean water should be used at all times and dirty water should be
disposed of appropriately – which means down a gully trap or a designated sink
for emptying buckets.
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Soap
Generally, soap is made from animal fats and caustic soda.
Soap can be an effective cleaning agent for some surfaces, but it can leave an unacceptable and
unattractive residue.
If not dried quickly, this residue will dry and create the need for the entire surface to be cleaned again.
This residue needs to be removed with a detergent-based product.
In general terms, soap is not used for cleaning equipment/surfaces.
Polishes
Polish can come as a paste, liquid or cream form.
Polish protects surfaces and forms a barrier against liquids that may harm the surface.
Spirit-based polishes are generally used for metal surfaces as well as windows and mirrors.
Oil-based polishes are generally used for leather, wood, synthetic flooring, linoleum and tiles.
Remember that surfaces can be slippery after they have been polished, so polish should be used with
this in mind.
Abrasives
Abrasive cleaning agents are available in powder, cream or paste forms.
They are used for scouring and cleaning ceramic or enamel surfaces.
An example of such a surface is the toilet bowl or the shower basin:
abrasive cleaners must not be used on surfaces that scratch easily.
Abrasives can be hard to rinse away, so it is important to wipe and rinse as
soon as possible after application: if they are left to dry, abrasives can be
much harder to rinse and clean away, and may leave behind a harmful residue.
Detergents
Detergents are chemical-based and can vary in strength; therefore it is
important to follow the correct dilution instructions when using this
type of cleaning agent.
Detergents have different pH scales and it is the pH level of the
detergent that informs the user of the type of surface it is best used on.
Acidic detergents (graded as having a pH of 1 to 6) should be used for
cleaning ceramic surfaces.
A pH of 7 is a neutral pH level and these types of detergents are useful
for general cleaning.
Alkaline detergents (graded as having a pH of 8 to 14) should be used
only for specialist tasks, as they can be corrosive and have the ability to
damage a surface.
High alkaline detergents should be used only as directed and only on surfaces
they were designed to clean. The surface they are used to clean should also
be rinsed thoroughly to remove any harmful residue.
Remember that high alkaline detergents can be harmful to the skin. They
should be treated with care and spillage should be avoided at all times.
Protective clothing should be worn when using high alkaline detergents.
Specialised Cleaning Agents
Cleaning chemicals have been developed to address specific cleaning tasks.
Check what is available in your workplace or cleaning store and use them where appropriate.
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These ‘specialty’ products have been developed for:
 A range of floor and carpet cleaning needs – specific for different surface types (tile, lino, carpet,
wood, etc) and specific stains, dirt of types of damage. These include stripping and re-sealing
products for hard floor surfaces
 Windows and glass
 Stainless steel
 Leather
 Aluminium
 Toilets
 Various laundry uses
 Cleaning specific equipment and areas – such as rubbish bins, smokehouses, vehicles, furniture
polishes.
Solvents
Solvent-based detergents will dissolve heavy grease and oil.
It is most important to realise that not all surfaces can be cleaned with solvent detergents.
For example, it would not be appropriate to remove oil that has been spilt onto a lounge suite with a
solvent detergent. However a metal surface could remain unharmed if cleaned with a solvent detergent.
Again, refer to the manufacturer’s instructions when using such a cleaning product.
Remember that solvent-based detergents may be harmful to the skin. They should be treated with care
and spillage should be avoided at all times.
Surfaces that have been cleaned with solvents must be rinsed thoroughly to remove any harmful
residue.
Disinfectants
 Disinfectants are cleaning agents that destroy disease-carrying
micro-organisms.
 Disinfectants should be diluted according to manufacturer’s
instructions: if it is diluted too much the disinfectant will
become ineffective.
 Disinfectants have a strong scent and so are not suitable for
use in a kitchen or any food area.
 Disinfectants should be used only in the toilet, bathroom and
change areas.
Deodorisers
Deodorisers are used to mask or eliminate unpleasant smells.
They are commonly in aerosol form and should be sprayed sparingly to achieve their aim but not
dominate or over-power.
Urinal blocks are also used to mask smells in gents’ toilets. When using them follow the recommended
dosage rate. Don’t simply throw handfuls of them into the urinal! They are expensive and on their own
they don’t provide any cleaning function.
The moral being, you still need to clean the urinal even where these blocks are used.
Websites for chemical suppliers
It is best to start off by looking at the company that supplies the chemicals to your workplace to gain
more information about them and their products and services.
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Check out:
 http://www.johnsondiversey.com/
 http://www.peerless.com.au/
 http://www.jasol.com.au/.
OTHERS
Environmental issues
As businesses seek to reduce their pollution levels, carbon footprints and
overall energy usage, there has been growing concern about the use of
chemicals.
The emergence of a ‘green chemicals’ movement has occurred but it
appears very much in its infancy at the time of writing with many
alternative options to chemicals being used primarily in homes rather than
businesses.
Businesses that are looking to live up to a claimed ‘green and caring’
image will currently look to the following in relation to environmental
concerns regarding chemicals:
 Monitoring the green chemical movement
 Advising chemical suppliers they are seeking for environmentallyfriendly chemicals – and will buy them if they are developed
 Training staff in the correct usage of chemicals – so that chemical usage is minimised consistent
with achieving the desired workplace outcomes and standard: a primary aim here is training
staff to use only the right amount of chemicals, measuring quantities rather than guessing at
them, mixing only the amounts needed to complete a job rather than mixing ‘too much’ and
wasting it
 Securing the chemical store to prevent unauthorised use of the chemicals
 Disposing of chemicals in environmentally sensitive ways that align with legal requirements.
Types of surfaces to be cleaned
There are a number of different surfaces that need to be cleaned in public areas.
Common surfaces to be cleaned within a hospitality organisation include,
but not limited to:
 Leather upholstery – chairs and couches
 Fabric upholstery – curtains, chairs, couches
 Glass surfaces – mirrors, windows and glass tables
 Ceilings, walls, surfaces and fittings
 Wet areas –floors.
The approach and methods used to clean each of these surfaces will be
discussed in detail in each of the following sections.
Disposal of garbage and used chemicals
Once garbage has been collected from the room, public areas and kitchen,
it must be transported safely to the appropriate garbage location, usually a dump master.
Near the dump master there may be a number of recycling stations– paper, plastics, cans and as much
garbage as possible should be recycled.
Protective clothing should always be worn when handling or disposing of garbage.
Chemicals are different to garbage and should be treated as such.
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Disposal of garbage
Garbage must be disposed of regularly – it must never be allowed to
accumulate inside the premises. A minimum requirement is to remove
all garbage on a daily basis.
In addition:
 Comply with any recycling protocols the business has
 Make sure all rubbish goes into the bins and is not left lying
around next to them
 Close lids to bins after using them. There may be a need to lock
them to prevent unauthorised use
 Use the appropriate bin/disposal system for the appropriate
type of rubbish. Liquid waste will be separated from solid waste
 Wash hands after handling rubbish.
Disposal of chemicals
When cleaning, handling and disposing of chemicals, the following
points should be adhered to:

Chemicals should never come in direct contact with the
skin – always wear PPE

When spilt, chemicals should be initially soaked up with
sand, earth or some kind of designated absorbent material.
Left-over chemicals in undiluted form must never be disposed of
down a sink or a gully trap.
State and local laws address the environmentally friendly and safe
disposal of chemicals by requiring them to be:
 Taken to designated collection sites
 Collected by specially licensed collection businesses.
 Chemicals should only be poured down drains that are fitted
to chemical traps – never assume a drain leads to a chemical
trap.
 Where you are unsure about the requirements for disposal of
chemicals, contact your local council for relevant local
requirements. They will give you advice as to how to comply
with current relevant legislation.
 Chemicals must not be poured down stormwater drains in
order to prevent pollution of the environment and avoid the risk of fines and adverse media
attention.
Cleaning and maintaining PPE
 All equipment and PPE must be cleaned before being stored.
 This is to enable it to be ready for immediate use and to reduce the chance of being affected by
chemicals etc.
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Note that personal hand washing is a significant part of maintaining and cleaning any PPE.
Protective gloves should be worn when cleaning and maintaining PPE.
 Manufacturer’s instructions must be followed when cleaning or maintaining any PPE.
 There is relatively little that individuals can do in relation to repairing PPE. It is usually the case
of returning items to suppliers for service, or throwing them out and buying a new one.
Safety-checking equipment and PPE
All PPE must be safety-checked prior to storage.
Appropriate requests for maintenance and replacement
must be made at this stage if problems are identified.
Standard PPE checks include:
 Checking for rips and tears to gloves and aprons
 Checking for holes and leaks in safety shoes
 Verifying the integrity of safety glasses
 Replacing the filters in respirators.

Clean equipment after use
 It is important for all equipment to be cleaned
after every use.
 This will ensure that dirt and grime from a previous cleaning task is not transferred on to
another surface.
 Manufacturer’s instructions coupled with house policies will dictate what needs to be done in
individual circumstances.
 Equipment that requires cleaning and the possible techniques that can be used include the
following.
 Check what applies where you work and where these differ to what is provided, adhere to
house requirements. If in doubt, ask your supervisor.
Mops
Cleaning of the three main types of mops:
• Dusting mops – after use, shake thoroughly in appropriate location
(outside) then wash in hot soapy water and hang out to air dry
• Polishing mops – on a regular basis, remove fluff and rinse mop in
turpentine, which will remove the polish – after the mop has been
squeeze-dried, re-coat with polish
• Washing mops – on a regular basis mops should be washed in hot soapy
water, rinsed thoroughly, squeeze-dried and then hung up to air dry.
Sanitising is recommended and should be mandatory where the mop is
used in food areas.
Dusters
Cleaning of dusters involves their being shaken clean regularly in the appropriate location (outside), and
then washed in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions.
Brooms and brushes
Cleaning of brooms and brushes involves their being shaken clean, washed in hot soapy water, and then
left to air dry.
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Cloths and sponges
These should be cleaned on a regular basis using hot soapy water, and left to air dry.
Buckets
They should be cleaned out thoroughly after each use with hot soapy water, and left to air dry.
Vacuum cleaners
 All vacuum cleaners must be cleaned out at the end of each shift and the bag replaced, if
required.
 The machine and its attachments must be wiped clean.
 The power cord should be wrapped correctly and safely.
 All cleaning of vacuum cleaners must be done in accordance with manufacturer’s instructions.
Carpet shampoo machines
 Carpet shampoo machine and all attachments must be cleaned out on a regular basis.
 The machine must be wiped clean and the power cord should be stored correctly.
 All cleaning of carpet shampoo machines must be done in accordance with manufacturer’s
instructions.
Floor machines
Floor machines and all their attachments must be cleaned on a regular basis.
All cleaning of floor machines and attachments must be done in accordance with manufacturer’s
instructions.
Store equipment in the designated area and in a condition ready for re‑use
All cleaning equipment will have an allocated storage area.
Equipment must be returned to this area after use.
Cleaning equipment cannot be left ‘just anywhere’ after it has
been used because:
 It may be stolen
 It may be a hazard in terms of an obstruction or a
tripping hazard
 Others may need to use it and they will go to where it
should be.
 Before equipment can be stored away, it should be
checked to ensure it is clean and ready to be re-used.
 Never put away equipment that has not been cleaned and checked. If the inspection requires
action to be taken, whether to repair or report, do it.
Location for storage
 Where a cleaning storeroom exists, items will need to go back there.
 A property can have several small storerooms throughout the property. Normally this is one per
department or one per floor.
 In some cases, certain items (especially larger electrically-powered) may be stored in another
location because they are too big to go into the cleaning storeroom area. Adhere to the SOPs
where you work.
 These storage areas should all be back-of-house locations and fitted with locks to prevent
unauthorised access to equipment. Make sure the store is locked when you leave it
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It is important that equipment is stored in a clean condition and in the right location for a number of
reasons, some of which may include:
Store chemicals according to safety and health requirements
The correct storage of chemicals is of the utmost importance.
 Storage areas must be prepared with the appropriate drainage, safety equipment, fire sprinklers
and the correct fire fighting equipment.
 Access to these stores should be restricted only to staff who have received appropriate OHS
training in handling chemicals.
 Any undiluted chemicals remaining on your cleaning trolley or in your cleaning bucket must be
stored safely at the end of the shift or cleaning task.
 House policies will determine whether these chemicals need to be stored in the chemicals store
or if they can be returned to the cleaning storeroom. Usually,
chemicals in smaller containers (1 litre to 5 litre containers and
trigger spray bottles) can remain with the mops, buckets etc or
stay on the cleaning trolley or in the cleaning bucket or carryall.
The following guidelines need to be considered when storing
chemicals:
 Keep in a storeroom away from other products – the room
should be marked ‘dangerous goods’, have necessary
HAZCHEM signage, and restricted access
 A register should be maintained to record items in accordance with legislated requirements
 The store room for chemicals must be well lit and ventilated
 The room should only be used for storing chemicals
 Heavy containers must be stored on lower shelves to avoid the need for lifting, and to minimise
the chance of spills
 Keep containers well sealed and labelled
 Have MSDS and first aid directions posted in the area – together with first aid resources to
support possible treatment requirements
 Keep away from a naked flame or excessive heat
 Product usage charts should be close to the chemicals
for easy and clear reference purposes – including
details relating to dilution, items that chemicals can be
used on
 Instructions for safe chemical handling must be posted
– to provide instruction on decanting chemicals
 Necessary PPE should be present – gloves, aprons,
respirators, gauntlets and hoses
 Never store chemicals or cleaning agents in food containers
 Never store chemicals with food
 Do not allow customers to come into contact with chemicals, or entry into the chemicals storage
area
 Never mix chemicals together – some may explode
 Ensure measuring devices for chemicals are not used for any other purpose.
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Cleaning public areas
Whilst this manual will focus on cleaning, using different techniques for a variety of public area surfaces,
it is important to identify and explain common public areas and steps associated with ensuring these
areas remain clean, tidy and ready for use and enjoyment by guests.
Gardens
Many hotels and resorts include garden or natural bush environments. Whilst these areas may not be
directly used by guests, they greatly influence the ambiance and natural beauty and tranquillity of the
area.
It is essential that all gardens and natural features are maintained in a clean and attractive manner.
In many hotels there may be a dedicated gardening or grounds team, or these functions may come
under the responsibility of the public area cleaner.
The gardening responsibilities vary with the seasons but may include:
 Plant, water and trim plants and flowers
 Pull out dead grasses and debris from trees
 Trim and water the grass in order to maintain its mass
 Lay fertilizers and other chemicals to flowers and plants
 Maintain the cleanliness in the garden by sweeping up trash and
pulling out dead plants
 Do basic landscaping and designs for the beautification of gardens
 Maintain and develop the gardens to the requirements of the
organisation
 Take charge of grass cutting, emptying bins, weed control and leaf
raking
 Plant new trees, flowers and various plants
 Drive plant vehicles
 Maintain plant tubs and baskets
 Make sure that all garden equipment is correctly maintained and
serviced
 Paint and refinish outdoor patio furniture
 Seed plants and water them at the correct times
 Clear rubbish and litter away from the garden and grounds
 Clean fences, walls and ponds
 Ensure walk ways are clean
 Give advice and guidance to managers on all matters relating to
gardening
 Ensure lighting in the garden and around garden furniture and
ornaments is in working order and condition
 Ensure a safe working environment for everyone working in the garden
 Undertake the basic servicing and repair of all garden machinery
 Ensure that all water sprinklers are operational.
Swimming Pools
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Many hotels and resorts will have an array of water features, with the largest being pools, either
for decorative purposes or for the enjoyment of guests.
 For resorts, the pool is one of the major draw cards for guests and is the location in which they
spend a considerable amount of time.
 Therefore it is essential that pools are maintained for the enjoyment of guests.
 The following are activities that can be performed by public area cleaners to ensure pools are
sparkling clean, inviting, refreshing and ready for use every day.
 The key is just staying on top of it.
 Routine pool maintenance may also prevent frustration and
complaints by customers who are concerned about the
appearance or state of pools.
Cleaning pool
The following steps can be followed by public area cleaners to ensure
the pool remains clean and inviting for guests:
 Remove leaves and other floating items –pick up junk before it
sinks or gets clogged in the plumbing
 At least once a week, clean leaves out of the pool's strainers
(the baskets that catch debris)
 Brush your pool walls weekly to remove algae and other culprits - use a soft brush on tile or
fiberglass walls and a stiffer brush on the walls of plaster-lined pools. If you need to undertake
deeper cleaning, use a nylon scouring pad and a liquid cleaner
 Vacuum each week to keep the pool water clean. Cover the entire bottom of the pool with your
vacuum strokes.
 Keep your pool water sanitized to reduce algae and bacteria.
Liquid chlorine is the most common sanitizer, although there
are other, newer methods. Use a test kit to tell when you
need to add chlorine
 If your pool water is cloudy, check your filter and clean it, if
necessary. Different steps are required to clean sand,
diatomaceous earth and cartridge filters
 Place a pool cover on at the end of the day if required
 Check pool lighting
 Always keep chemicals stored out of direct sunlight. Keep them in a cool dry place. Do NOT store
acid and chlorine right next to each other
 Keep vegetation, animals and chemicals away from and out of
the pool.

Cleaning pool area
Not only must the pool be inviting, but the pool area itself must also be
clean, safe and ready for use.
Activities to ensure a pool area remains operating efficiently include:
 Washing and sweeping tiles around pool and under deck chairs
 Returning pool devices and recreational equipment to their
designated areas
 Realigning deck chairs and umbrellas
 Removing used towels and placing new towels on deck chairs or stations, where required
 Removing dirty glasses, plates and napkins
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
Cleaning pool side tables and chairs including the realignment of promotions or other table
materials.
Hotel entrance or Front Desk on Cruise ship
 The hotel entrance must be clean and tidy as this is not only the first contact point for
customers, but is where customers wait whilst their car is being retrieved. In addition, this is the
main entrance point for all customers and what passing traffic and walkers see. Therefore it
must reflect a well run and professional operation.
 The hotel entrance area, incorporating the driveway and outdoor area outside the main doors
itself, may be the responsibility of concierge, porters, valet departments or public area cleaners.
 Regardless of who is in charge it must be maintained. With this in mind:
 All surfaces must be clean, tidy and void of rubbish
 The waiting area, including seating or queuing area, must be maintained and managed
 Rubbish and smoking areas must be cleaned and clear of rubbish.
Corridors
 The corridors must be clear of rubbish and cleaned.
Signage
Car parks use a range of signs or ropes to reserve car places or to block areas which may be required for
tour coaches etc. These must be located in easy to reach places.
Remove litter from any part of public areas
Once a visual inspection has taken place, the next task of all public areas staff is to make sure these
areas are:
 Free from obvious rubbish and debris
 Clean from dust and dirt.
When cleaning, common tasks include:
 Picking up general rubbish
 Emptying and cleaning rubbish bins
 Cleaning cigarette bins
 Sweeping up dirt and small debris
 High pressure cleaning of walls and ground.
When cleaning is being done, especially in the immediate location of
guests or customers, all necessary precautions must be taken
including:
 Placing of ‘cleaning in progress’ or ‘caution – wet area’ signs
 Ensuring windows are closed
 Ensuring water does not get under room doors
 Drying any seats used by customers.
Check lighting
Given hotel operations are 24 hours a day, all lights must be in working condition. Whether the car park
is located in a dark underground area or outside, for safety reasons all lights must be operational at
night.
Not only must overhead lights be in working condition, lighting must also be
working where the following items are placed:
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 Boom gates
 Signs
 Pay stations
 Cruise ship entrance and lift areas that connect with cabin and public areas
 Walking paths, corridors and gardens.
In many cases, the location of the lights does not mean public area cleaners have to replace these lights
themselves. They may be required to get maintenance or an external contractor (in the event of public
lights) involved.
Maintain area appearance
 Watering any fresh flowers or plants
 Spot cleaning where required
 Making sure the external appearance of the property is attractive – by checking the footpath
etc.
Maintain fire equipment: Fire extinguishers
Fire extinguishers are commonly found in public areas as they are easy access points for both hotel staff
and fire fighting experts to gather the necessary equipment to control and eliminate fires.
Quite often fire extinguishers are located in cupboards or other easily accessible and visible locations.
Public area cleaners should check to ensure:
 The fire extinguishers themselves have not been removed
 They have not been tampered with by checking to see if the pin is still in place
 There is no rubbish or other items placed in the cupboard.
If for any reason it appears that the fire extinguishers may not be operationally ready it is important to
notify management immediately.
Smoke detectors
All hotels have smoke detectors, not just in kitchens and guest rooms, but in public areas.
These are vital fire detection systems and it is important that they are
operational and functioning. There are a number of small actions that a
public area cleaner can undertake to ensure they are ready for use including:
 Test smoke detectors once a month
 Press the test button on detectors and check that the device beeps
or rings loudly.
 If a smoke detector starts chirping or beeping off and on, it’s time to
change the batteries.
Sprinkler heads
When checking smoke detectors it is also a good time to ensure sprinkler heads are also in operational
condition and have not been broken in any manner.
Conclusion
 In conclusion, this introduction provided detailed information when it comes to general cleaning
functions performed by public area cleaners.
 Each of the following sections will detail procedures for different and specific types of cleaning.
1: Apply leather upholstery cleaning techniques
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1.1 Assess leather upholstery to be cleaned
Assessing leather
Leather is a popular soft and durable material that is
commonly used in furniture. Leather covered furniture is
normally used in chairs and booths in restaurants as they look
great, but are also easy to clean.
With constant use of this type of furniture, it exposes the
material to dust, dirt, and stains, which threatens to ruin the
unique finish and beauty of leather products.
However, since leather is used in most F&B outlets, many
different tips and techniques to cleaning the material have
been identified.
A majority of the leather furniture comes prepared with
top-coated protected leather, however this is not always
guaranteed.
So before getting started on your cleaning, you always
have to double check on the kind of leather you have.
As leather is a durable substance, most cleaning to be
performed will be as an on-going preventative
maintenance, as opposed to an urgent need for cleaning.
That said, leather covered furniture should be checked whenever arranged at the start of the day and
when wiped down and / or stacked at the end of the day.
If your leather upholstery needs to be repaired, make sure you repair the damage before proceeding to
cleaning, protecting, and conditioning. Though it is rare, you may have to follow a different cleaning
method after repairs, so be sure to always do this first.
Always keep leather furniture out of direct sunlight to prevent drying and cracking the leather.
1.2 Select appropriate equipment and chemicals
Equipment
The equipment required to clean leather is fairly simple.
Equipment required
 Vacuum cleaner
 Bucket
 Soft cloth for cleaning
 Soft bristled toothbrushes
 Soft cloth for buffing / polishing.
Cleaning products
Due to the nature of leather, more often than not, strong chemicals
are not used.
There is a variety of cleaning products that can be used to clean and maintain leather including:
 Moisturizing soap – for general cleaning
 Rubbing alcohol
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

Leather Protection Cream -is a leather conditioner is used to protect leather that repels stains
and protects the surface from wear and tear. It feeds, protects and re-instates the smell into old
and new leather items
Products recommended by a manufacturer.
1.3 Prepare work site
Prepare work site
There is no major preparation that needs to be performed before cleaning
leather. Most cleaning can take place where the furniture is normally
located.
You may want to ensure that any cleaning in conducted at a suitable time
between service periods.
Also refer to introduction for detailed steps involved in preparing the
worksite.
1.4 Clean upholstery
Immediate cleaning
Spills shouldn't be a problem if a leather protector has
been applied, but you still have to clean them up right
away, just in case the protection is starting to wear off
and the moisture does get absorbed by the leather.
For general leather cleaning, use a moisturizing soap.
Lather on with a soft cloth, and wash the item to
remove dirt and grime. Do not over wet the leather
and do not rinse after washing, just buff with a soft
cloth. This allows the moisturizing soap to condition the leather. Polish as usual.
Regular cleaning
When cleaning leather, soft materials, such as cloths must be used because leather can scratch easily,
affecting its distinct grain or finish.
Cleaning steps include:
 Wiping of leather furniture at the end of a shift, or two or three times a
week with a soft rag
 Leather should be dusted or wiped with clean rags two to three times a
week. This will help prevent dust and dirt build up, especially in the
crevices
 Don't rub down on your furniture too hard as you may accidentally
scratch the surface
 Vacuum the furniture once a week using the vacuum's soft brush
attachment.
Removing ink
On occasions, ink from pens may spill on leather furniture. The key is to try to remove as soon as
possible by:
 Dip the cotton swab into rubbing alcohol
 and rub over the ink stain
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


Dry the area with a blow dryer
If you still see the stain after drying, apply a thick coat
of non-gel, non-oily cuticle remover
Leave this on overnight and wipe off with a damp cloth.
Remove dark stains from light coloured furniture
To remove dark stains from your lightly coloured leather
upholstery, follow these steps:
 Mix one part crème of tartar with one part lemon juice
to form a paste
 Rub this paste on the stain, leaving in place for 10
minutes; repeat this step
 Remove with a damp sponge or a damp sponge and moisturizing soap.
Annual cleaning
Cleaning leather at least once or twice a year is considered the best method to maintain your pieces.
Follow your cleaning regimen with a leather conditioner. This will make sure that the leather stays
supple and doesn't dry out despite the cleaning.
Conditioning leather is very important as this will help prevent dryness and cracks. Try to condition
leather after each general cleaning and after repairs have been made.
Apply a leather protector once or twice a year.
1.5 Tidy work site
When you have completed the cleaning of leather furniture please ensure that any equipment and
materials is not left behind.
Please refer to introduction for detailed information relating to tidying a work site after the completion
of work.
1.6 Clean, check and store equipment and chemicals
Steps
Please place any used cloths in a suitable place for cleaning.
Please ensure the vacuum cleaner has been cleaned out of all dirt and
other waste products and placed back in a suitable location for further
use.
Place all chemicals and other substances used in a storage area out of
reach of children.
Please refer to introduction for detailed information relating to
cleaning, checking and storing equipment and chemicals.
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2: Apply fabric upholstery cleaning techniques
2.1 Assess fabric upholstery to be cleaned
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Benefits of fabric
Fabric upholstery is used on a large amount of furniture items in hotels
as it allows for greater flexibilities of colour, patterns, designs and
textures.
It is a great material as it is normally less expensive than leather and in
many cases is easy to clean and with removable covers, limits impact
on operations, whilst still providing inter-changeable features.
In many hotels fabric is the chosen material for furniture.
Before cleaning fabric upholstery it is important to look at it closely to
determine the type of cleaning to be performed.
It is a simple procedure; it can be done by staff. It is involves damage
including rips, cuts or deep stains, it may require professional
attention.
2.2 Select appropriate equipment and chemicals
Equipment
The equipment required to clean fabric is fairly simple.
Equipment required:
 Vacuum cleaner
 Bucket
 Cloths for cleaning and washing away detergent
 Drying machines
 Wet furniture signs.
Cleaning products
Due to the nature of fabric, like leather, more often than not, strong chemicals are not used.
The cleaning materials used to clean fabric are quite simple and standard:
 Liquid or powder fabric detergent or liquid washing detergent
 Cleaning shampoo
 Stain remover
 Warm water
 Products recommended by a manufacturer.
2.3 Prepare work site
Steps to prepare work site
When preparing the work area for cleaning fabric upholstery, the
size and location and frequency of use of the furniture will be
contributing factors how and when cleaning should take place.
Firstly, it is best to conduct cleaning:
 When it will have little impact on guests
 When it allows for sufficient time to dry before use.
 Depending on the size of the furniture, like leather, most of
the cleaning will take place where the furniture is actually
located.
 If this is the case, it is best to:
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Place a ‘wet furniture’ sign in a suitable location to ensure customers don’t sit on the furniture
whist it is wet
Remove any items such as newspapers and magazines
Vacuum the furniture and cushions.
2.4 Clean upholstery
Introduction
Like with all cleaning procedures, preventative maintenance and up-keeping of
upholstered furniture is the most effective way to keep it clean.
This is a simple process of:
 Regular vacuuming of furniture, normally conducted on a weekly basis,
to remove any dirt particles, dust and prevent heavy soiling of the
fabric.
General cleaning
Steps involved in the general cleaning of fabric include:
 Remove any loose items from the furniture including cushions
 Loosen dirt with a handheld dusting brush while using a vacuum brush attachment to remove
the dust
 Vacuum all surfaces of the furniture: back, sides, arms, skirt and the platform beneath the
cushions.
 Vacuum both sides of the loose cushions.
 Remove any cushions
 If the fabric is removable and interchangeable, you may wish to do
this to wash in a different area or using a washing machine, if it
does not cause damage or shrinkage. It is best to check the
manufacturer’s instructions
 Mix laundry or other suitable detergent with warm water. Ensure
the detergent has dissolved or has been mixed properly
 Select a test area to conduct trial cleaning. This is a location not
normally visible when viewing the furniture in its usual location.
This could be a small area on the back, bottom or underneath of
furniture. Test by dipping a cloth in the water and detergent mix
and rubbing a small place on the back of furniture
 Let the trial clean dry. If fading, shrinkage or discoloration occurs,
you may wish to have it cleaned by experts
 If no problems have been identified in the trial cleaning process,
go to the next step
 Select an area on the furniture, dip cloth and rub water and detergent mix on the fabric
 Dirt or any marks will begin to remove from the fabric
 Use a clean cloth and plain water
 Rinse area with a damp cloth to ensure detergent has been removed from the fabric
 If some stains or dirt remains, you may wish to repeat the cleaning steps until it is suitably clean
 Allow to dry overnight. Some hospitality establishments may have a professional drier or
depending on the size of furniture, it may be placed near an open window or outdoors for
quicker drying.
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Deep cleaning
Deep cleaning your upholstered furniture can be
done for a number of reasons:
 Remove deep stains and accumulated dirt
 Help to keep furniture look like as new as
possible
 Ensure furniture is as clean as possible, which
helps keeps insects and other animals away.
 Deep cleaning can be done by people within
the housekeeping department or depending
on area of specialisation, available resources
and time; it may be outsourced to a professional company.
 The steps associated with a deep cleaning of fabric upholstery
include:
 Remove any blankets, covers or cushions
 Conduct a thorough vacuum ensuring all surfaces of the
furniture are cleaned including the sides, arms, both sides of
the cushions, the base and underneath section, as well as any
corners and creases using an upholstery or crevice vacuum
attachment
 Replace the cushions back on the furniture
 Check your furniture's label for cleaning instructions before
washing
 Prepare a suitable cleaning agent. This may include a
specialised shampoo or stain remover
 Similar to regular cleaning, conduct a trial clean
 Ensure no further stains or other foreseeable problems have arisen
 Spot treat any existing stains with a suitable stain remover
 Prepare hot water and add detergent or cleaning shampoo into a
large bucket. Ensure that the mixture is well mixed with adequate
cleaning bubbles
 Use a rough cloth or brush to clean the upholstery but gently
putting part of the cloth into the soapy solution. Do not to soak the
fabric
 Use a clean damp cloth to soak up the dirty soap, and rinse with a
damp cloth
 Let the furniture dry overnight with an airing fan pointed at the wet
furniture to help it dry more quickly.
2.5 Tidy work site
Considerations
Once the cleaning has taken place, whether through the process of a regular or deep cleaning, it is
important that the furniture has:
 Time to dry
 Does not attract any dirt or dust during the drying process
 Is not used by customers whilst.
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Like with cleaning of leather furniture, you may wish to place a ‘wet furniture’ sign at attract the
attention of customers, or take the furniture to a different location, if possible, if the area is still
to remain in use by customers.
If the furniture is to remain in its usual location, please ensure:
All equipment has been removed
All cushions, blankets and other items to be placed on the furniture is
returned
The surrounding area is clean and dry.
Please refer to introduction for detailed information relating to tidying
a work site after the completion of work.
2.6 Clean, check and store equipment and chemicals
Steps
 Please place any used cloths in a suitable place for cleaning.
 Please ensure the vacuum cleaner and buckets has been cleaned out of all dirt and other waste
products and placed back in a suitable location for further use.
 Place all chemicals and other substances used in a storage area out of reach of children.
 Please refer to introduction for detailed information relating to cleaning,
checking and storing equipment and chemicals.
3 Apply Glass Surfaces Cleaning Techniques
3.1 Assess glass areas to be cleaned
Uses of glass
Glass is used in many hotels as it is very effective in improving the aesthetics of an
area and giving the appearance of more space.
Glass is commonly found in:
•
Windows
•
Mirrors
•
Coffee tables
•
Showers.
3.2 Select appropriate equipment and chemicals
Equipment
Scrubber
The scrubbing wand, sometimes called the T-handle, is one of the window
cleaning tools that does the actual scrubbing of the window. The wand is
formed in the shape of a T and is made of lightweight durable plastic. A
reusable lint-free wand cover sleeve slips over the top and is held in place with snaps or Velcro tabs. The
wand is then dipped into a bucket filled with window cleaning product and water.
Squeegee
The squeegee is the main tool used to remove the water and cleaning solution from the glass after it has
been scrubbed. A squeegee consists of three parts: handle, metal channel, and rubber blade.
Equipment belt or bucket
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Having a fully equipped tool belt or bucket is essential to ensure you have everything within easy reach.
As you may be on a ladder it is not practical to have to go up and down to
retrieve items.
They will hold your squeegee, wiping cloths, scraper, extra blades, and wand
bucket, along with other items you may want. Everything is conveniently
within reach at hip level.
Having this type of system is the best. It will keep all your tools safe, clean and
organized so you can stay focused on the task at hand.
Window Cleaning Buckets
When it comes to choosing a bucket, decide for yourself which one might work best for you. You can
choose one that hooks on your belt or one that sits on the floor. The advantage to one that hooks to
your belt is that it is convenient when working on ladders.
Window Scraper
Tools such as the window scraper are very important to understand. When it comes to removing debris
from glass, you want to use a professional grade window scraper. These scrapers are specially designed
to be used on glass. Any other tool used to scrape windows, such as standard house hold razors, box
cutters, or putty knives etc will cause damage to the glass.
Window Cleaning Towels
Believe it or not, the window cleaning towels that will be used are not actually used for cleaning the
glass. The cleaning is done almost exclusively with the scrubbing wand itself. The cleaning cloths are
used primarily for wiping edges or blotting small spots that were missed by the squeegee.
Extension Poles
Extension poles are very helpful reaching high places requiring cleaning.
Whilst a ladder is a very good tool, an extension pole allows you to reach
places where:
 Speed is required
 Where furniture cannot be moved to place a ladder
 Where the floor may not be level or stable.
Ladder
A ladder is a great tool to reach high areas on windows. Many hotel
windows are quite large and may go from the floor to the ceiling. By having a
small step ladder or even a higher one may be beneficial and a lot safer than
standing on tables or chairs.
Cleaning products
There is a whole range of cleaning products that can be used.
This can include:
 Commercial window cleaning agents
 Homemade window cleaning liquids.
3.3 Perpare work site
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Steps to prepare work site
When preparing to clean, it is vital that the area in which you are going to clean is free from any
obstacles that may either get in your way or may get covered in cleaning products or water.
Remove any items off a glass surface, if you are dealing with a coffee table.
Remove any furniture away from windows and unplug any items (electrical cords for lamps) that may
get in the way of your walking or ladder areas.
Please refer to introduction for detailed information relating to how to prepare a work site prior to
cleaning.
3.4 Clean glass areas
Cleaning a window
Scrubbing
Look carefully at a glass surface before you start to clean. Look for things like scratches, cracks, chips,
hard water spots, paint, stucco, silicone or cement. This will give you a good idea of how hard to scrub,
or whether or not you will need a window scraper to remove the hard to move items.
If the glass is especially dirty, it is recommended to give it a pre-wash. Using your scrubber or a natural
sponge, soak the entire window. Then use your squeegee to remove the dirty
water.
Now that the majority of dirt is off the glass you can give your window another
inspection. Rewet the window and begin to scrub. When scrubbing a window,
start with the edges. Scrub back and forth, up and down along each edge.
Then, start scrubbing from the top and work your way down to the bottom
using small circular motions. Use caution when pressing on any glass. Windows
can take quite a bit of pressure, but if the glass is thin or the integrity has been
weakened due to deep scratches or cracks, it could break.
If you find that there is debris that will not come off with normal scrubbing, you may have to use
chemicals, solvents or a scraper. If you are cleaning non tempered glass, a window scraper is usually safe
to use and will remove 98% of all stubborn debris.
Scraping
 Wet the window
 Find a corner to test the scraper out on.
 Scrape in a forward motion three or four times in the same
spot.
 If it feels and sounds smooth on the third or fourth scrape
and there is no scratching, you’re safe to continue with the rest of the window.
 If it sounds and feels like the scraper is sliding across sand paper, and continues to sound this
way even after the third or fourth scrape, do not scrape the rest of the window. The sandpaperlike sound indicates that this may be flawed or tempered glass that contains raised
imperfections.
 If tempered or regular glass that contains raised imperfections is scraped, it will cause scratches
in the glass.
Once you have determined that it’s safe to scrape the glass, finish the whole window:
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Start with the edges
Scrape from the inside of the window towards the outside edge
Work all the way around the window with a one to two inch pattern
After the edges are scraped, start from the top and work your way towards the bottom
Scrape in a straight pattern of about four to five inches while overlapping each time
If the window starts to dry out before your finished, wet it again and then continue where you
left off.
Using a squeegee
 You should start out learning to squeegee the window from side to side. It is much easier than
starting from the top and pulling down. The majority of the windows you clean on a normal
basis should be cleaned this way.
 The entire window should be wet with soapy water. Determine which side of the window you
will be starting on. This may depend on whether you are right or left handed. Take one of the
window cleaning towels and wrap you index finger. If you are right handed, wipe the entire right
hand edge of the window. Make sure it is completely dry. You may have to move the towel
around to a dry spot in the process. Now do the same with the top edge of the window. This will
help keep water from dripping down on your window after you squeegee it.
 Now that the side and top edges are dry, take your squeegee in hand. Place the rubber blade at
the top of the dry right hand edge. As you start to pull it across the window, pull the top of the
channel out first so that you can maintain an angle of about 15 to 20 degrees. Pull the squeegee
all the way over to the opposite side of the window.
 Using your towel, wipe the squeegee blade completely free from water. Also check to see if the
side and top edge is still dry. If not give them a quick wipe so that they stay dry. Repeat the
same step to finish the lower half of the window.
 Now that the window has been squeezed off, you will need to wipe the edges. This is also
known as detailing. It is very important to wipe all the remaining
water from the edges in order to get a crisp, flawless finished
look.
Cleaning a mirror
Mirrors can be difficult to clean as they may be located in hard to reach
places or have substantial frames that may be difficult to clean around.
Quite often when cleaning a window streaks, specks or dirt may remain.
Following are simple steps to use when cleaning a window:
 Use a glass cleaning product or combination of white or distilled vinegar and warm water
 Find newspaper to use as your cleaning cloth
 Crumple the newspaper into usable sizes
 Clean the mirror first to remove any heavy dirt or marks
 Use plain water to do the pre-cleaning. Use a cloth with
a tight weave, which is more soft and non-abrasive
 Dip the newspaper into the vinegar water solution after
pre-cleaning is finished.
 Rub the newspaper in slow circles across the mirror
 Cover the entire surface of the mirror
 Go over the wet areas with a dry portion of newspaper. This will leave the mirror dry and keep
drip marks from drying onto the surface.
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Cleaning a glass coffee table
Glass coffee tables are commonly found in hotels. As they are used on a regular basis, they easily attract
dust, dirt, hand prints and stains left by crockery and cutlery. Juice glasses and coffee cups are normal
culprits for leaving marks.
Simple steps to follow when cleaning a coffee table include:
 Take all items off the coffee table including flowers, ashtrays, magazines and newspapers
 Wipe the table with a clean dry cloth to remove any dry
substances
 Spray a glass cleaner or water on the top of the table
 Scrub the table with a cloth to remove any hard to get
stains
 Clean and dry the table with a dry cloth or newspaper.
3.5 Tidy work site
Considerations
 Remove all cleaning equipment and products
 Ensure all surfaces are clean and dry. This is especially applies to floors which may become dirty
or wet
 Return all furniture to their original spots
 Plug in all electrical appliances, especially lights and lamps, that were unplugged as part of the
cleaning process
 Return any items to coffee tables
 In the event of windows, return any shades or shutters to their correct position.
 Please refer to introduction for detailed information relating to tidying a work site after the
completion of work.
3.6 Clean, check and store equipment and chemicals
Steps
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Please place any used cloths in a suitable place for cleaning
Place all used newspaper pieces in the rubbish bin
Please ensure all pieces of equipment has been cleaned out
of all detergents, residual dirt and other waste products,
then placed back in a suitable location for further use
Place all chemicals and other substances used in a storage
area out of reach of children.
Please refer to introduction for detailed information
relating to cleaning, checking and storing equipment and
chemicals.
4: Apply ceilings, surfaces and fittings cleaning techniques
4.1 Assess ceilings, surfaces and fittings areas to be cleaned
Types of ceilings, surfaces and fittings
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This section looks at the greatest variety of cleaning performed by a public area attendant. It involves
various cleaning procedures, equipment and chemicals.
In essence the following needs to be cleaned.
Ceilings
This can include all walls and ceilings:
 Painted
 Wooden
 Wallpaper.
This also includes skirting boards that highlight the separation of walls to ceilings and floors.
Surfaces
This can relate to any 'surface' in a public area including:
All furniture including fridges, tables, cupboards, ledges, bookshelves and desks to name a few
(excluding leather and fabric covered furniture previously discussed)
 Lights and lamps
 Decorations and flower vases
 Public bathrooms including vanities, toilets and public showers
 Rubbish bins
 Fixtures refer to items that are attached including heaters, air
conditioners and lights
 Fittings
 A fitting refers to taps, pipes and electrical aspects of a public
space.
4.2 Select appropriate equipment and chemicals
Equipment
There is a great deal of equipment that can be used to clean ceilings, surfaces and fittings. These are
listed below. For greater explanation please refer to the introduction section of the manual.

 Mops
 Brooms and brushes
 Cloths and sponges
 Buckets
 Garbage receptacles
 Gloves
 Cleaning warning signs
 Personal protective equipment
 Dust pans
 Vacuum cleaners
 Equipment complimentary items.
Cleaning products
There is a great deal of cleaning products that can be used when
cleaning ceilings, walls, surfaces and fittings. These are listed in the Introduction section of the manual.
4.3 Prepare work site
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Steps to prepare work site
When preparing the work site it is important to remember to:
 Conduct work during quiet times
 Consider safety – remove any items that may be considered a safety hazard when cleaning. This
includes electrical cords of any light, lamps or equipment
 Ensure all items are removed from the cleaning area
 Keep all equipment and cleaning products close at hand and out of traffic areas and the reach of
customers
 Have all ‘cleaning in progress’ signs ready and visible to customers
 Allow ample time for drying before customers will be using the area.
 Please refer to introduction for detailed information relating to how to prepare a work site prior
to cleaning
4.4 Clean ceilings, surfaces and fittings
Dusting and polishing
The main purpose of dusting is to collect small particles of
dust.
The main purpose of polishing is to clean the item and
leave a shiny, reflecting finish.
Dusting may be done with a duster or a damp lint-free
cloth.
It is important to use common sense when choosing which
piece of equipment to dust with. Don’t use a damp cloth if
the moisture could ruin the object being cleaned and
remember to change the cloth when soiled.
You’re on-the-job training, which will probably include
being teamed up with an experienced room attendant for a couple of days, will provide all the
workplace guidance you need in this regard.
When polishing an item, make sure to:
 Spray the cleaning agent onto the cloth - not onto the surface to be cleaned
 Buff the surface after cleaning to remove any streaks.
 When dusting and polishing, it is best to start in one
spot and work around the area, say, in a clockwise
direction. This routine should be followed in each
instance. Some small items may need to be picked up
in order to dust or polish underneath.
 The following areas will need either dusting or
polishing:
 Air conditioning vents
 Doors – including top ledge and handles
 Picture frames – facing glass as well as frame
 Mirrors – frame and mirror
 Skirting boards
 Windows – glass and frames
 Window sills
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Walls – check for cobwebs and marks
Lamps – base, shade and cord
Telephone – main unit and hand receiver
Seat furniture – don’t forget to remove cushions and
check sides, legs, back and underneath
All furniture – top, sides, legs, and underneath each item.
Vacuuming
 All carpeted areas should be vacuumed and many noncarpeted areas including wooden, tiled or linoleum
floors may also require vacuuming.
 It is essential that all surfaces are clean and free from dirt, dust
and other items
 Any stains on carpeted areas should be removed using the
appropriate stain removal method for your property that relates
specifically to the type of carpet, the active ingredients of the
chemical and the type of stain. Where this does not remove the
stain, a maintenance report may need to be completed, or the
supervisor notified.
 Try to vacuum the area starting at the furthest corner from the
door and work back toward the exit.
 Ensure you vacuum around and under all furniture.
 Particular attention should be placed on the corners of the room,
including the skirting boards.
 To avoid injury when vacuuming, bend your knees when
cleaning under items.
 Try to avoid ‘bending over’ the machine. Keep it behind you
where possible, moving it forward as you vacuum from a
point furthest from the room entry door towards the
entrance door of the room.
CLEANING PUBLIC BATHROOMS
Cleaning vanity areas
The vanity area is normally the most used area in a rest room.
The vanity area normally includes:
 Bathroom bench
 Basins
 Taps
 Mirror
 Handtowels
 Amenities
 Soap containers.
 Similar to when cleaning most surfaces, always wear protective gloves when cleaning the
vanity/washing area.
The recommended steps are:
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Clean and dry shelves
Scrub hand basin, rinse, then dry and polish with clean cloth – check plughole
Polish fittings and taps
Clean and dry wall tiles
Clean, dry and polish bench top
Clean and polish mirror
Check under vanity for cleanliness – cobwebs, etc
Replenish stock – soap, tissues, facial items, shower caps, water
Replenish towels – paper or linen
Conduct final check.
Cleaning public area showers
Some hospitality organisations will provide public shower facilities. This may include golf clubhouses or
an area close to pools or beach at a resort allowing guests to refresh without having to return to their
rooms.
Always wear protective gloves when cleaning a shower.
The shower can be effectively cleaned as follows:
1. Wet shower basin and sides
2. Clean tiles and floor – check plughole for foreign matter
3. Clean shower curtain – check pole is clean and all hooks are in place
and working
4. Rinse walls and floor thoroughly
5. Polish fittings
6. Replenish supplies – shampoo, conditioner and soap
7. Conduct final inspection – leave shower curtain neat and to one side.
Cleaning toilets
The following steps are effective when:
1. Flush toilet to wet sides of bowl
2. Pour in cleanser – leave to soak: continue with other work
3. Wash lid and dry – both sides and near back hinges
4. Wash seat and dry – both sides and near back hinges
5. Wash outsides of the bowl and dry
6. Wash and dry water holding unit and polish button
7. Scour bowl thoroughly – use a toilet brush
8. Flush toilet a number of times to wash away dirt and residue
9. Place a hygiene strip over the closed toilet lid
10. Conduct final inspection – leave lid down when thoroughly cleaned.
Take a second to recheck that the toilet is clean. This includes the lid and seats,
on both sides.
It is also important to ensure any chemicals are removed from toilet
surfaces as this cause discomfort if coming in contact with the skin of
guests.
Cleaning bins
You should always wear protective gloves when cleaning the bin and
should be extra careful when handling the bin as many hazardous
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items may have been thrown out by the guest – broken glass, razor blades, syringes to mention a few.
Always be vigilant for items that could cause any health or safety risk.
Broken glassware or bottles should be wrapped up in newspaper and disposed of separately and safely.
Waste bins should be properly cleaned by:
 Tying the bin liner around the rubbish or emptying the bin directly into your waste bag on the
trolley. Remove larger and non-dangerous by hand to
facilitate this process where applicable
 Spraying bin with appropriate multi-purpose cleaner, inside
and out
 Cleaning with the appropriate cloth.
 Fit a new bin liner in the manner approved by the
establishment.
4.5 Tidy work site
Considerations
At the completion of cleaning it is important to ensure the public
area is left in a clean and tidy state.
When tidying a work area, always think ‘If I was a customer, would I
like the appearance of this public area?”
In essence, there should be no trace of any cleaning activity
conducted and should be ready for use by any customer.
Please refer to introduction for detailed information relating to tidying a work site after the completion
of work.
4.6 Clean, check and store equipment and chemicals
Steps
 Please place any used cloths in a suitable place for cleaning
 Place all used newspaper pieces in the rubbish bin
 Ensure any rubbish taken from rubbish bins are placed in
the external rubbish areas with recycling functions
conducted in line with company policy
 Please ensure all pieces of equipment has been cleaned
out of all detergents, residual dirt and other waste products, then placed back in a suitable
location for further use
 Place all chemicals and other substances used in a storage area out of reach of children.
 Please refer to introduction for detailed information relating to cleaning, checking and storing
equipment and chemicals.
5: Clean room
5.1
Follow in-house requirements and policies in relation to room cleaning
What is wet area cleaning
There are many public areas in a hotel that contain wet areas. These are floor areas that can be
classified as areas that either:
 Commonly have wet surfaces
 Require water to clean them.
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The types of surfaces that are usually wet or require water to clean them include:
 Wood
 Carpet
 Marble
 Rubber
 Tiles
 Concrete
 Vinyl.
Like the process involved in assessing wet areas to be cleaned, there are some points to keep in mind:
 When should it be cleaned routinely?
 When is an ‘immediate clean required?
 When is the most appropriate time to clean it to keep customer disruption to a minimum?
 What do I need to clean it?
 How do I clean it?
5.2
Clean fixtures and fittings
Equipment
When deciding the best equipment to clean a wet area or using a wet cleaning method, the type of
surface to be cleaned is important.
There is a great deal of equipment that can be used to clean wet areas. These are listed below. For
greater explanation please refer to the introduction section of the manual.
 Mops
 Brooms and brushes
 Cloths and sponges
 Buckets
 Carpet shampoo machines
 Polishers
 Scrubbing machines
 Floor machines.
Cleaning products
There is a great deal of cleaning products that can be used when cleaning
wet areas or using wet cleaning methods. These are listed in the Introduction section of the manual.
5.3
Vacuum floors and other areas
Steps to prepare work area
When preparing to clean a floor using a wet method is to ensure the floor
area to be cleaned is free from any furniture or other objects.
This may involve stacking tables and chairs to a side, or placing chairs on a
table so the floor area is clear.
Normally this type of cleaning is done at night when there are fewer
customers in the public areas such as the lobby or when specific outlets
are closed, such as the pool area, gymnasium and restaurants.
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Please refer to introduction for detailed information relating to how to prepare a work site prior to
cleaning.
5.4
Clean kitchenette area, where applicable
The most popular and easiest way to clean a floor is through mopping. The steps associated with
mopping are identified below.
There are other types of equipment that can be used to clean floors. Each of these will require the
operator to follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
Mopping
Floors can become very dirty places and therefore it is important they are cleaned correctly and
thoroughly.
From dirt and dust to the hairsprays, soaps and shampoos, dirt can
easily stick around for awhile. While floors are nice to look at when
they're clean and sparkling, it doesn't take much to sully them.
Dirt and grime trapped between the tiles and marring the
appearance of the grout can make the floor unclean.
Keeping floors clean is essential not only for looking nice, but for
sanitary reasons as well.
Steps to mopping
1. Remove everything that may be on the floor such as mats, trash cans, and small pieces of furniture
2. Sweep the floor to remove dirt, hair, dust, and other debris
3. Dissolve detergent into warm water using the manufacturer's
instructions for the correct water to detergent ratio
4. Pour the solution over the entire floor so that the solution can fill into
the grout lines
5. Allow the solution to remain on the floor for 15 to 20 minutes
6. Scrub the grout with a small medium-bristled brush
7. Rinse the floor with a mop dampened with clean water
8. Mix a second batch of detergent and water
9. Mop the entire floor with the fresh solution
10. Rinse the mop with clean water and mop a second time over the floor
to rinse it
11. Use a squeegee to push residual moisture to one area of the floor before absorbing it with dry
towels.
5.5 Tidy work site
Considerations
At the completion of cleaning it is important to ensure the public area is left
in a clean and tidy state.
More importantly, the surfaces must be dry or safe for customers to use. If
the floor is still wet, not only does it attract more dirt by people walking but
ca n cause falls and spills.
If it absolutely essential that customers must use an area which contains a
wet surface, adequate warning signs and barriers should be put into place.
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Once the follow is dry, all equipment and furniture should be returned to their original location and all
‘wet floor’ caution signs removed.
Please refer to introduction for detailed information relating to tidying a work site after the completion
of work
5.6 Clean, check and store equipment and chemicals
Steps
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Please place any used cloths in a suitable place for cleaning.
Place all used newspaper pieces in the rubbish bin.
Please ensure all pieces of equipment has been cleaned out of all detergents, residual dirt and
other waste products, and then placed back in a suitable location for further use.
Place all chemicals and other substances used in a storage area out of reach of children.
Please refer to introduction for detailed information relating to cleaning, checking and storing
equipment and chemicals.
6: Apply pressure washing techniques
6.1 Assess area to be pressure washed
What is pressure washing?
Pressure washing has become a popular cleaning method as it is a quick and effective method which
relies on a machine to do the hard work of dirt removal, rather than the exertion of manual labour.
With public areas closed for small periods of time, or not at all, in many hotel outlets, cleaning methods
that are quick, effective and simple will always be a preferred option.
6.2
Carry out rotational cleaning duties
Equipment
Machine
There are many distributors of pressure cleaners each serving their own purposes and have their own
points of difference.
Nozzles & tips
For using pressure washer efficiently you need to choose the correct
nozzle or tip.
Most pressure cleaning machines will come with interchangeable
spray tips that serve two purposes:
 To lower the pressure and draw the detergent
 Deliver a high pressure rinse at the different spray angles.
Cleaning agents
In essence a pressure cleaning machine will use a mixture of detergent and water to clean and water
only to rinse.
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Each pressure cleaning machine will come with its own instructions for use and recommended cleaning
agents. Use only chemicals and pressure washer cleaning solutions that are approved for pressure
washer use.
Whilst there will be many brands of cleaning products, there purpose will remain the same.
Some of these include:
 Film removers – used for removing layers of dirt and grime using a light pressure clean. This
includes the cleaning of cars, paths, roads (main driveway) and outdoor areas
 Degreasers - used for removing heavy greaser and industrial cleaning.
6.3 Lend equipment to guests, as requested in accordance with house policies
Steps to prepare work area
When preparing work area using pressure cleaning the main thing to consider is what you are going to
clean. This needs to be planned in advance, with any items that could be potentially damaged, either
removed or avoided.
Care needs to be taken when pressure cleaning around windows, flowers and garden vegetation, vents,
eaves or light fixtures. They can break or become damaged if aimed directly at them.
If you are to clean the edges around windows you need to check for any holes that can allow water to
come inside a window or property. In order to prevent this check for any holes, dents and scratches on
the frame of the window.
In addition, if you are going to clean around any automated or
sliding doors, especially at the entrance of a building,
appropriate action including closing, locking and placing barriers
to stop water getting in under the doors, should be taken.
Prepare your equipment and again ensure they are out of range
of customers and that cleaning is to take place at an appropriate
time.
Please refer to introduction for detailed information relating to
how to prepare a work site prior to cleaning.
6.4 Cleaning steps using a pressure washing machine
Cleaning steps
Cleaning steps using a pressure washing machine include:
 Place any safety equipment on including closed shoes, waterproof clothing and safety glasses
 Connect the machine to a water source
 Attach the nozzle or tip and ensure it is correctly
attached
 Start the machine
 Test the power of the pressure washer. The best
is to start spraying few feet away from any
object. Slowly bring your wand to 3-4 feet
distance from the surface you want to clean.
Move your wand side-to-side a couple of times
and check if the surface is clean. If additional
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cleaning is needed, move your wand gradually closer to the surface. The reason for the gradual
cleaning is because pressure washers are extremely powerful and if you start too close you
could damage the object instead of cleaning it
Start to clean using a side to side motion. Keep the nozzle low and start closer to the body and
then move the cleaning action further away until you find the right blend of pressure to clean
and accuracy
When washing walls start from the bottom and move up. Remember to take care when cleaning
around areas such as windows and lights
If you are to clean windows, clean from the side. Do not apply a direct ‘face-on’ contact. Check
to ensure that water is not leaking inside
When cleaning the ground, start at lower areas and work your up
You may need to scrub areas that a pressure cleaner cannot remove stains
Let the cleaning solution do its work for 20 minutes. This allows for the detergent to start
dissolving the dirt, but do not let it sit too long so that it dries out
When ready to rinse start at the top and work towards the
bottom until entire area is detergent free.
7. APPLY HIGH LEVEL CLEANING TECHNIQUES
7.1 Complete required records and notifications
Types of high level cleaning
As the title suggest high level cleaning is cleaning of items which are
‘at a high level’ above the ground. High level cleaning is more difficult
that other types of cleaning identified to date and in most cases
requires the use of specialised staff to perform these cleaning duties.
Types of high level cleaning include areas such as:
 High level lights and chandeliers
 High ceilings and ceiling beams
 High exhaust extraction fans in kitchens
 Cleaning external windows on high rise hotels
 Skylights
 Sculptures
 Foyer glass
 Signs and banners.
7.2 Select appropriate equipment and chemicals
Equipment
As stated above, depending on the height of the item to be cleaned,
it can be done by hotel staff or it may require the expertise of a
professional.
If the job is to be performed by a staff member, common equipment includes:
 Ladders
 Safety ropes
 Extension poles
 High pressure cleaning equipment
 Cranes – this normally requires specialised staff to operate.
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All of these items have been discussed in detail in previous sections.
7.3 Prepare work site
Steps to prepare work site
Depending on the area to clean, safety is the key. The most important aspect is ensuring that equipment
used to raise you to a certain height is safe, grounded and placed on a secure and level ground.
You need to prepare any equipment and cleaning materials in a manner that allows for each access
when you are ‘at height’
This may require the use of a cleaning tool belt containing adequate cloths and cleaning agents.
You may also need to rope off the area so that customers and staff do not wander into the space and
either come in contact with ladders or have items fall on them.
It is also wise to have another person with you to:
 Support the ladder
 Pass items up and down
 Pass comment
 Direct passers-by.
 When cleaning at height, it is natural that any
dirty items will fall down. Think about the
furniture directly under where cleaning will take
place and make necessary arrangements
including:
 Removing the item
 Covering the item with sheets or other protective materials.
Please refer to introduction for detailed information relating to how to prepare a work site prior to
cleaning.
7.4 Clean high level areas
Considerations
Depending on the type of cleaning, please proceed as explained in previous sections.
For further comment, techniques and steps involved in cleaning, please refer to the appropriate type of
cleaning indentified in the manual.
7.5 Tidy work site
Considerations
At the completion of cleaning it is important to ensure the public area is left in a clean and tidy state.
You may be required to:
 Remove to coverings you have placed on furniture
 Conduct a vacuum, sweep or mop of the area
 Ensure the floor is dry
 Once the follow is dry, all equipment and furniture should be returned to their original location
and all ‘wet floor’ caution signs removed.
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Please refer to introduction for detailed information relating to tidying a work site after the
completion of work.
7.6 Clean, check and store equipment and chemicals
Steps
Please ensure all pieces of equipment has been cleaned out of all detergents, residual dirt and other
waste products, then placed back in a suitable location for further use
Place all chemicals and other substances used in a storage area out of reach of children.
Please refer to introduction for detailed information relating to cleaning, checking and storing
equipment and chemicals.
CLEAN AND PREPARE ROOMS FOR INCOMING GUESTS
Glossary
Term
Explanation
Chemical
A product, normally in liquid form, used to clean a
surface
Clean
Free from dirt; unsoiled; unstained
Deodoriser
A product used to remove, disguise, or absorb odour,
especially when unpleasant
Defect
A shortcoming, fault, or imperfection
Disinfectant
Any chemical agent used chiefly on inanimate objects to
destroy or inhibit the growth of harmful organisms
Dry Cleaning
The cleaning of garments, fabrics, draperies, etc., with
various chemicals rather than with water
Duvet
Fittings
Furnishings
Grooming
Housekeeping
Aquilt, or comforter, usually down-filled, often with a
removable cover
Anything provided as equipment in a guest room
usually attached to ceiling, wall or floor
Movable items of furniture in a guest room, such as
chairs and tables
To tend carefully as to person and dress; make neat or
tidy
Cleaning and maintenance of for example, a house or
guest rooms in an hotel
Kitchenette
A small kitchen or part of another room equipped for
use as a kitchen
Laundry
Articles of clothing, bed linen, tablecloths or similar,
that have been or are to be washed
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Term
Explanation
Manual handling
The act of pushing, pulling or lifting
OSH
OSH refers to ‘Occupational Safety and Health. It relates
to workplace health and safety policies, procedures and
practices
Policy
A rule, a definite course of action
Polish
To make smooth and glossy, especially by rubbing or
friction, usually with a cloth and an appropriate
chemical
Procedure
A particular course or mode of action
RFID
Radio Frequency Identification Device. Used to identify
information on a hotel room key card.
Strip
To remove bed linen from a mattress
Suite
Trolley
Twin room
Hospitality accommodation containing more than one
room
A transport vehicle used in housekeeping to move
supplies from room to room
Two beds in a room
CLEAN AND PREPARE ROOMS FOR INCOMING GUESTS
1: Identify the role of room attendants
Performance Criteria
1.1
Describe the services delivered by a room attendant
1.2
Locate the position of room attendants within the enterprise
1.3
Identify the personal characteristics required of a room attendant
1.4
Describe grooming and personal presentation standards for a room attendant
1.5
Interpret enterprise policies and procedures for the provision of housekeeping services
1.6
Identify and explain the role of communication in the provision of housekeeping
services
2: Prepare for cleaning duties
Performance Criteria
2.1
Replenish linen room supplies
2.2
Load housekeeping trolley with supplies for service
2.3
Check housekeeping trolley prior to use
2.4
Identify rooms to be cleaned for the shift
2.5
Access and enter guest room appropriately
3: Make beds
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Performance Criteria
3.1
Strip and re-make bed with fresh bed linen
3.2
Re-make bed using existing bed linen
4: Clean bathroom
Performance Criteria
4.1
Clean bath and shower area
4.2
Clean toilets
4.3
Clean vanity area
4.4
Clean floors
4.5
Replenish guest supplies
5: Clean room
Performance Criteria
5.1
Follow in-house requirements and policies in relation to room cleaning
5.2
Clean fixtures and fittings
5.3
Vacuum floors and other areas
5.4
Clean kitchenette area, where applicable
5.5
Replenish guest supplies
5.6
Check operational readiness of all items and equipment
5.7
Report and remedy room defects and damaged items
5.8
Report suspicious items or situations
5.9
Handle guest property left in room from which the guest has departed
6: Provide additional housekeeping services
Performance Criteria
6.1
Provide turn-down service
6.2
Carry out rotational cleaning duties
6.3
Lend equipment to guests, as requested in accordance with house policies
7: Prepare for next shift
Performance Criteria
7.1
Complete required records and notifications
7.2
Dispose of rubbish
7.3
Clean and store trolleys
7.4
Replenish stock items as necessary
7.5
Clean housekeeping equipment prior to storage
1. IDENTIFY THE ROLE OF ROOM ATTENDANTS
1.1 Describe the services delivered by a room attendant
Introduction
Room attendants are located in any tourism and hospitality business that
provides accommodation to their guests. In many hotels and resorts,
more people are employed as room attendants than any other front line
position.
The role of a room attendant is important for a number of reasons.
It may not be regarded as a glamorous position like working in a bar or
on the reception desk; however a customer experience is certainly
impacted, in a positive or negative way, depending on how well a room
attendant performs their job.
The job of a room attendant quite often goes unnoticed as their job is
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performed when the guest is not in the room. That said, the services they provide are experienced by
every guest who stays in the hotel. Every guest will use most aspects of the room. They will sleep in the
bed, clean their teeth at the basin, use the toilet and walk on the floor.
Rooms in hotels and resorts quite often accommodate different guests from one night to the next.
However when a guest arrives, the room must appear as though no-one has stayed there before, with
no exceptions.
Hotel and resort guests have high expectations of how a room should be cleaned and presented prior to
their arrival. Every trace of past guests must be removed, down to single strands of hair and finger
prints.
So what is the role of a room attendant? It is obvious their role is to clean guest rooms but there is more
to the job than this.
Their role is to facilitate the comfort and satisfaction of guests by ensuring that their ‘home away from
home’ is clean, safe and presented in an appealing manner.
Whilst their primary function is to clean they must also be
friendly, informative, and discreet, and handle any requests or
problems relating to the guest room.
Areas of responsibility
There are a number of areas of responsibility room attendants
must manage as part of their role.
In summary they are responsible for the:
 Cleanliness and overall appearance of guest rooms
 Security of guest rooms and privacy of guests.
Guest Relations
Every employee of a hotel, including room attendants, is expected to
warmly greet guests and to be friendly and professional.
In many cases they need to work independently from other colleagues and
must handle any problems that arise, without the assistance or guidance of
others.
If there is a complaint about the room or its furnishings or fixtures, in many
cases the room attendant must not only handle to issue, but take
ownership to ensure it is resolved in a timely manner.
Guest Safety
The job description of a room attendant includes ensuring the safety and
well being of guests and their property.
Cleaning
They are required to ensure all aspects of a guest room are clean and tidy.
Administration & Communication
Room attendants must ensure they understand what rooms they are to clean
and in which order. Administration and communication is vital to ensure
rooms are returned ‘clean’ ready for new guests.
Daily activities
Following is a list of activities a room attendant may be required to complete
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on a daily basis. As you can see there are many activities a room attendant is responsible for in a normal
work shift, involving a wide variety of knowledge and skills.
Prepare for work
 Collect master keys
 Collect daily room allocation sheets
 Stock housekeeping trolleys
 Stock and store supplies
 Determine the order of cleaning of rooms
 Identify any special requests.
Enter room
 Knock on door in compliance with policy
 Open door
 Place trolley in door path.
Clean room
 Open curtains and windows for ventilation
 Remove used guest amenities and rubbish
 Clean showers, tubs, sinks and bathroom items
 Change linen and make beds
 Check for damaged linen items
 Inspect rooms for safety hazards and for the operating condition of equipment and report
defects to the maintenance department
 Report lost and found articles, maintenance problems or special room problems
 Dust and clean room decorations, appliances and structural
surfaces (wall fixtures, window sills, and vents)
 Dust, brush, polish vacuuming furniture.
 Replenish guest amenities and supplies
 Check, record and replenish mini bar
 Prepare rooms for guest arrival and respond to special guest
requests, such as delivering newspapers or cleaning a spill.
 Deliver and retrieve items on loan to guests such as iron and ironing
board
 Perform rotation cleaning duties (such as. steam clean of carpets)
as required
 Vacuum and sweep carpets and other floor surfaces.
 Mop floor surfaces as needed.
 Record room status on work assignment sheets
 Phone supervisor or reception updating status of room
 Close door.
Provide information to guests
 Listen, and respond to guests’ requests or complaints
 Explain room equipment and facilities
 Explain and handle dry cleaning and laundry requests
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Provide information to guests about hotel services, facilities and other amenities
Provide information to guests about local attractions, services and location of places for
religious worship
Other specific information may include prayer and fasting times, location of prayer mats and
orientation for prayer.
Maintain storage areas and trolleys
 Return trolley to storage room
 Remove used and soiled linen from housekeeping cart
 Dispatch soiled linen to the laundry
 Replenish linen and guest amenities to normal stock levels on trolleys
 Handle lost property
 Clean cleaning equipment including mops and vacuum cleaners
 Remove rubbish
 Clean storage room floor.
Close shift
 Return work allocation sheets
 Return keys.
 The following sections containing in this manual will look in detail, the steps and techniques
used to successfully complete the necessary activities expected of room attendants.
 It is commonly recognised that the role of room attendant is physically demanding and requires
a wide scope of tasks to be performed. As such, it takes a special person to do the job well.
1.2 Locate the position of room attendants within the enterprise
Introduction
Room attendants
Where does the position of room attendant fit into the overall hospitality or tourism organisation?
Their department
Room attendants work in the Housekeeping department. The Housekeeping department is the spine of
the hotel, employing the most people and is responsible for:
 The cleanliness of the hotel – including all rooms and public
areas. Public areas can include foyers, car parks, restaurants,
hallways, gymnasiums and gardens
 Lost property – any items that have been lost or found by
guests
 Laundry and dry cleaning – ensuring the cleanliness of guest
items and all room linen, towels and uniforms.
 In many hotels and resorts the Housekeeping department is
part of Rooms Division. This division is responsible for all activities relating to accommodation
including:
 Reservations – taking individual and group bookings
 Switchboard – handling incoming and outgoing calls, transfers and enquiries made by
telephones within the hotel
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Reception – responsible for checking in and out of guests, finalising invoicing and payments,
handling guest enquiries, and currency exchange
Concierge and bell service – handling guest luggage, enquiries and valet services.
Their supervisor
A room attendant will usually report to will be a senior room attendant or a housekeeping supervisor.
This person is responsible for the allocation of rooms to room attendants and to check rooms upon
completion of cleaning by room attendants.
The head of Housekeeping is called the Executive Housekeeper. This person will report to the Rooms
Division Manager.
1.3 Identify the personal characteristics required of a room
attendant
Introduction
The role of a room attendant requires an individual who is able to
complete a variety of tasks.
Whilst some of the personal characteristics of a room attendant are similar to those of anyone else
working in the tourism and hospitality industry, there are also job specific skill sets that are required.
Knowledge
 Of working condition of all items – including televisions, air-conditioning
systems, and internet access
 Of the hotel and room facilities – to be able to answer guest enquiries and
to promote the hotel’s facilities and features
 Of use of cleaning equipment and chemicals
 Of correct procedures for cleaning a room
 Of safety and security.
Skills
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To be able to perform cleaning duties in a thorough and efficient manner
To perform manual handling safely and efficiently.
Attributes
 Hard working
 Physically strong - mobility and stamina are required to clean for long periods of time
 Ability to follow instructions – most activities follow strict procedures
 Good time management –room attendants may be required to clean between 12 and 20 rooms
per shift, without supervision
 Attention to detail – ability to ensure cleaning is performed to an extremely high standard
 Professional attitude
 Ability to work independently
 Previous customer service experience is an advantage
 Good communication skills
 Good organisational skills.
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Importance of integrity, honesty and discretion
 Whilst any role within the hospitality industry requires staff maintain a professional level of
integrity, it is especially important in the housekeeping department, especially by those whom
clean guest rooms.
 It is important to remember that the guest room is a private area in which the guest can relax
and enjoy the facilities. Essentially the guest room is a ‘home away from home’ for the guest.
One of the main differences is that in hotels, this private space is frequented by hotel staff, with
the room attendant spending considerable time performing cleaning duties.
 The guest must feel that what takes place or is left in the room, will remain confidential.
 For some guests, the guest room may be a place where activities may take place, which the
guest may not feel comfortable undertaking at their own home or residence.
 Naturally, if any action is in breach of local laws or regulations, the matter must be reported to
management for further action. This includes the use of illegal drugs or activities that may place
the guest and other patrons and staff under threat or harm.
 Whilst you may not morally agree with any items or actions being undertaken in the room, as
long as it is conducted in a legal manner, hotel staff must still be respectful to the privacy
expected by guests.
 Staff who enter occupied rooms must ensure that the integrity and confidentially of guests are
upheld at all times. In addition, staff must ensure that their own actions are conducted in an
honest and professional manner.
Therefore any hotel staff members who perform any activities in a guest room must not:
 Read confidential or personal information or examine items belonging to guests
 Use or consume guest items such as perfume or chocolates
 Share guest information with others
 Share information relating to guest activities to others.
Discretion is very important. Hotel staff must maintain the quality of being discreet, especially with
reference to the guest’s and their own actions, speech, prudence or decorum.
1.4 Describe grooming and personal presentation standards for a room attendant
Introduction
 A room attendant is an employee of the tourism or hospitality organisation, and employees are
‘the face of the business’ in the eyes of the guest.
 Their appearance must be in line with company policy and
professional industry standards.
 Due to the demanding nature of the role, this can be more
difficult. That said, high standards must still be maintained.
 Not only does the organisation have set standards in terms of
how it expects its staff to appear, the role will also dictate
specific grooming requirements to ensure tasks can be
completed in the most user-friendly manner.
 Hygiene and grooming are important to each staff member
and the organization as a whole. A major part of success
depends on a constantly well-groomed appearance. As room attendants are in the public eye
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they must maintain a conservative, tasteful and professional appearance that is consistent with
the ambiance of the organisation.
In all aspects of grooming, room attendants should reflect expectations of the guest and the
property. Most organizations will have strict grooming standards to ensure consistency, build
confidence and pride of staff and to uphold a professional image.
Grooming & personal presentation standards
Whilst each organisation will have their own specific standards, there are many that are similar. These
will be explored in this section.
Clothing
All clothes should be:
 Clean at the start of each day
 Replaced if soiled to a unsuitable standard
 Worn in the correct manner and
 Shoes to be suitable for the role.
Name Badge
 A staff member must wear their name badge at all times
 This is normally worn on chest on the left.
Hair
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Short and neat cut hair for men
Tight or pulled back hair for women
Natural hair colour
Men to have well trimmed facial hair or to be clean shaven.
Nails
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Short and well trimmed
No bright nail polish
Cleaned on a regular basis.
Jewellery
 One dress ring or wedding ring
 Suitable watches
 No other jewellery such as bracelets, earrings, nose rings or
necklaces.
Make up
 No excessive make up
 No visible tattoos.
Odour
 No excessive perfumes
 Staff should use deodorant on a regular basis. This is important in a labour intensive role like
cleaning rooms.
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Personal hygiene
 Bathe or shower before work
 Teeth must be brushed
 Hands and face must be washed and cleaned.
Personal belongings
 No personal bags in work areas
 No mobile phones.
 Whilst the physical demands of being a room attendant may be more labour intensive than
other roles, personal grooming and hygiene must still be consistent with all positions and
departments in an organisation.
1.5 Interpret enterprise policies and procedures for the provision of housekeeping services
Introduction
Each organisation will have its own policies and procedures. To begin with, it important to define what
policies and procedures are:
 Policy – rule or code of conduct
 Procedure – step by step instruction.
 Policies and procedures are very important and must be adhered to. They help to ensure the
health, safety, security and privacy of the organisation, its staff and guests, including their assets
and belongings.
Examples of policies and procedures
Examples of housekeeping policies
 Zero tolerance of theft.
 Guest room doors must be open whilst cleaning is in progress
 Protective clothes to be worn when cleaning
 Guest information is confidential.
Examples of housekeeping procedures
 Accessing a room
 Making a bed
 Cleaning a window
 Cleaning a bathroom
 Mopping a floor
 Handling lost property.
 Housekeeping will normally have more policies and procedures than
most departments in a hospitality business because of:
 The nature of the work
 The need for detailed consistency in performance of all tasks
 Safety and security priorities.
Who creates policies and procedures
Policies and procedures may be created by:
 Housekeeping department – for specific use in that location
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Head office – for use throughout the chain of properties
Manufacturers – to identify the correct methods for use and maintenance of products.
Types of policies and procedures
Policies and procedures in housekeeping normally relate to the correct handling, use, cleaning, storage
and use of protective items relating to:
 Equipment – housekeeping cleaning equipment including vacuum cleaners, waxing machines,
trolleys
 Chemicals – including all cleaning products and items
used to clean including cloths, rags, mops
 Furnishings – bedding, tables, couches, kitchens,
televisions, carpets
 Fittings – lights, electrical appliances, air conditioners
 Clothing – uniforms and protective clothing.
Communicating policies and procedures
It is important all staff understand the policies and procedures that relate to their job. It is the
responsibility of both management and staff to ensure these are understood.
There are a number of ways management can
communicate policies and procedures including:
 Job Descriptions
 Training sessions
 Standard Operating Procedures
 Checklists and Task Sheets
 Observation by colleagues
 Supervision and instruction by management.
1.6 Identify and explain the role of communication in the provision of housekeeping services
Introduction
As most staff will never enter a guest room except for a room attendant, it is
important that room attendants are the eyes and ears for the hotel, either to update
the status of rooms or co-ordinate any appropriate services to be performed,
including maintenance, in a timely manner.
Hotel rooms make up a large majority of the actual space within a hospitality
organisation and comprise a considerable financial investment. It is important that
this asset is maintained in an organised, legal, safe and secure manner.
In many cases the role of room attendants plays a large part of meeting these goals. It
is up to them to communicate and act when appropriate.
Positions room attendants communicate with
 So who do room attendants communicate with on a regular basis?
 Whilst room attendants communicate with all staff members, there are certain positions with
which they communicate with more than others.
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Receptionists
Room attendants work closely with reception for a number of reasons
including:
 To identify vacant rooms, and find out when guests have checked
out so they can start cleaning vacant dirty rooms
 To report clean rooms - when rooms are clean and ready for new
guests
 To handle special requirements - for incoming guests including VIPs
 To handle guest requests - relating to the room including such
things as additional towels and pillows, buckets of ice and for
laundry to collected
 To co-ordinate internet access.
House Attendants
These people will normally be responsible for the distribution of items
to/from from the housekeeping office to the store rooms on each
floor, for easier access by room attendants.
These items include:
 Cleaning products - sprays, agents and cleaning clothes
 Equipment – buckets and mops
 Linen – bed sheets, pillow cases, blankets, bath towels, floor mats, hand towels and face cloths
 Room supplies – including shampoo, conditioners, stationery,
matches, soaps etc
 Fresh produce – milk and biscuits to accompany tea and coffee
facilities
 Removal of dirty items – soiled bedding and rubbish
 Collection or return of laundry or dry cleaning.
 As a room attendant will normally be stationed on a selected floor,
they will communicate with house attendants if items need to be
replenished.
Maintenance
Room attendants will often call maintenance to fix or replace light bulbs and any faulty furnishings or
equipment. In many cases these calls will be made relating to faulty televisions and air conditioning.
Mini Bar
In some organisations, the room attendant may be responsible for replenishing mini bar items and
charging them to the guest rooms. In others this is performed by others as a separate mini bar service.
Room Service
When cleaning rooms, room attendants will remove used room service trays
which must be placed out of guest sight and placed in the appropriate
storage area on each guest floor. They will communicate with room service
for the trays to be collected from the storage areas.
Security
With room attendants spending the majority of their shift working on guest
floors, it is their responsibility to observe activities that take place around
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them. They must constantly listen and watch to ensure guest activities are conducted in a safe and
secure manner. If there are any issues which they cannot resolve, security must be contacted without
delay.
2 Prepare for cleaning duties
2.1 Replenish linen room supplies
Introduction
For most activities performed by a room attendant there are clear and precise
instructions on how to perform the tasks.
In this section we will identify all the activities that will need to be performed
before rooms are cleaned. As you will see, preparation is the key in ensuring
rooms are cleaned in an efficient and timely manner. As room attendants often
work in remote locations, not in close proximity to supplies, they must ensure
they have all the necessary items at their disposal before they enter and clean
rooms.
Before guest rooms are serviced, there is a need to prepare the linen room
supplies and trolley that will be used to cart the cleaning materials and the room supplies to those
rooms.
This section will also identify the equipment that needs to be selected and
prepared, and identify the ‘rooms’ that may be involved when preparing guest
rooms.
Need for adequate supplies
Having a well-equipped linen store is vital to efficiently and effectively servicing a
guest room.
Supplies must be accurately identified and selected in sufficient numbers in order
to service all necessary rooms. It is a waste of time to have to return to the
housekeeping area for extra stock during cleaning and service duties.
In some cases, storage rooms on different floors may contain different supplies where for example, all
rooms on the top two floors are ‘Penthouses’ and are stocked with better, more or different supplies.
Depending on the type of organisation, some supplies may be stored in suitable linen rooms or directly
on trolleys. For the purpose of this manual these items will be explained in detail in this section.
Equipment
Various pieces of equipment are needed to service a guest room.
These are usually stored on a housekeeping store room on each floor – or
in some central location.
Equipment that needs to be correctly selected and prepared before it is
used may include:
Housekeeping trolley
 A housekeeping trolley is sometimes called a ‘Maids’ trolley’.
 Check to see it is clean, presentable, and safe. There should be no jagged bits, nothing should
protrude to present a potential hazard, and the wheels should move easily and smoothly.
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


The trolley and all the equipment listed below are usually stored in a floor housekeeping store
or linen room that also contains stocks of trolley supplies such as give-away items, spare light
globes and toilet paper.
It is a standard industry requirement that nothing that is not part of the original design of the
trolley is allowed to hang from the trolley such as plastic or other bags. Hanging extra items off
the trolley certainly spoils and cheapens the appearance of the trolley as well presenting a
possible obstruction or hazard. The trolley may be fitted with one or two large bags that are part
of the original design – one bag for used linen and one bag for rubbish.
The floor housekeeping store room must be locked after you have
taken your trolley and supplies out of it.
Vacuum cleaner
This must be checked to see it is empty at the start of the shift, spare bags
are available (where appropriate), that the machine is fully functional and
that there are no frayed cords or other safety problems. Check should also
be made to ensure that all the vacuum machine tools/accessories that need
to be used are available.
Mops
Ensure the mop head looks presentable as guests will be able to see this and may
infer a lack of cleanliness in other or all cleaning from seeing a dirty mop head.
Also ensure it has been sanitised to kill bacteria. Mops may include wet mops for
washing floors and dry mops for polishing and dusting, depending on the areas to
be cleaned.
Brooms and brushes
These should be sufficient in number as dictated by the establishment,
clean, and sufficiently bristled.
The most common types of brooms and brushes are:
 Carpet brush
 Scrubbing brush
 Sink brush
 Silk brush
 Toilet brush
 Wall brush
 Soft broom
 Hand brush.
Not all types will be required on all trolleys. It will depend on the facilities to be
cleaned, and what exists elsewhere in the property for staff to use such as
brushes or brooms available in-room.
All trolleys should have a dust pan and brush set.
Buckets
These should be fully operational, not leaking, easy to operate, and not smelly.
Buckets may be required for wet mopping and most room servicing trolleys will also feature a couple of
plastic bucket-type containers used to hold cleaning materials, cloths, chemicals and used to carry items
into a guest room.
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Protective gloves
A good supply of disposable gloves should be on each trolley. Specific house
requirements in relation to individual Occupational Safety and Health (OSH)
issues may require other, more substantial protective clothing (including gloves)
be worn.
It is standard procedure in all premises that room attendants wear protective
gloves when cleaning and handling chemicals.
Housekeeping uniform
The housekeeping uniform is also regarded as ‘protective clothing’.
Cloths
Used for cleaning, polishing and dusting, every trolley will need to have lots of these. Some are made
from material and some are disposable.
Warning signs
These are safety signs used when a public area is being cleaned as part
of the overall room preparation process.
Dust pan
A dust pan is vital to collect dirt, dust and rubbish.
Cleaning agents and chemicals
Cleaning agents and other chemicals are used to perform various tasks and
clean various surfaces.
Depending on what is in each room you may be required to have:
 Polishes
 Detergents
 Glass cleaner
 Multi-purpose cleaners
 Oven cleaners
 Stainless steel cleaners
 Leather cleaners
 Porcelain and ceramic cleaners
2.2 Load housekeeping trolley with supplies for service
Introduction
In the last section we identified all items that need to be replenished.
Depending on the organisation these items will be placed in the linen store
or loaded directly onto the housekeeping trolley.
Therefore this section will look at health and safety issues to be addressed
when loading housekeeping trolleys.
Occupational safety and health is an on-going concern in all properties,
especially in the housekeeping area.
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Manual handling activities are the main cause of injuries in the workplace and the housekeeping
department traditionally gives rise to the majority of OSH injuries.
What is manual handling?
Manual handling activities include:
 Lifting – of stock, cartons and boxes
 Carrying – items from storage areas to trolleys, moving stock from place-to-place
 Pulling – boxes and cartons forward in storage areas
 Pushing trolleys.
 You have an obligation to safeguard your own safety and welfare, to follow safety procedures
and to use safety equipment that is provided when directed to do so.
 Your initial on-site training should make you aware of the safety aspects that relate to your role.
The employer has a legal obligation to provide this training and to monitor your activities to
ensure you are working safely.
Loading trolleys
When loading the trolley, ensure it is loaded safely and does not prevent any danger to others.
Remember that all items should be positioned on the trolley so they won’t fall over or fall off:
in addition, nothing should protrude.
If more supplies are needed than the trolley can hold, you will have to refill the trolley during the shift
by returning to the floor storeroom: trolleys should never be overloaded.
It is standard industry practice that no ‘extra’ bags are hung off housekeeping trolleys.
Key points to remember when stocking or handling trolleys:
 When identified, immediately report any damage or faults with the trolley – all housekeeping
departments should have periodical checks done on equipment by Maintenance department
 Always push the trolley, don’t pull it - it is important for you to see where you are going
 Always stock items in their designated place on the trolley - it is best to position heavy items on
the bottom to prevent the trolley from overturning. If you are not sure where things go, ask!
 Never lift anything on your own that weighs over 16 kg –
this is a recommendation from OSH authorities. There are
no maximum weight restrictions as the current approach is
to assess every lifting need on an individual basis and use
the most appropriate technique depending on the type of
load, how far it has to be moved or the size of the load
 Be prepared to ask for help when needed – this may be a
request for help such as to do a ‘team lift’ or a request for
information. You must also be prepared to provide help
when required.
 Trolleys are large items and when fully loaded can be
extremely heavy.
 The primary concern when handling trolleys is to ensure the safety of the room attendant.
2.3 Check housekeeping trolley prior to use
Introduction
Before leaving the housekeeping office or linen store it is vital that you have all the necessary supplies
on your housekeeping trolley.
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It is always advised to do a last check to ensure you have everything you need.
Additional items
Besides the supplies identified in this manual to date, there are a couple of other items that you may
need to take with you:
 Keys for floors and rooms
 Communication walkie-talkie
 List of rooms to clean and alternate rooms if allocated rooms
are unavailable for cleaning at that time
 Personal drink container.
In the last section we discussed the importance of manual handling
when dealing with trolleys. In this section we will look at security and
safety of both staff and customers.
Security of housekeeping trolleys and supplies
Trolleys contain many valuable items and care must be taken to ensure these items are not stolen.
Normally when a room attendant is working in the room or bathroom, with the trolley remaining in the
corridor, it is often out of view of the room attendant. This means that items can easily be taken by
anyone walking by, if the trolley is not securely locked.
It is vital that the security measures used in each organisation are
adhered to. Use a lock if one exists. This means room attendants
must carefully consider and take the necessary items from the
trolley required to service the room as having to regularly unlock
trolleys can take up valuable time. By careful selection, time can be
saved through efficient movement and reduced time required to go
back and forth from the trolley.
Naturally the theft of keys poses an immediate threat as it allows
immediate access to rooms; however room lists contain valuable information including room numbers
and names, which could be used by potential thieves who can impersonate guests with this information.
Position of trolleys on guest floors
When on the guest floors the location of where to place the housekeeping trolley is also vital. Security
and safety or both customers and room attendants must be considered.
Always position the trolley near the wall and out of the guest’s way. Don’t leave them in the middle of
the corridor as:
 It makes it harder for movement
of people in the corridor
 It makes it more appealing for
theft
 It helps avoid injuries by people
bumping into them. This is
especially true for children who
often run in corridors and at
times may not be concentrating
on where they are going
 In the event of an emergency
including fire where smoke reduces visibility, it is important that corridors remain clear.
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So where do you place the trolley?
The trolley will normally be parked across the guest’s door to prevent any unauthorised person
accessing the room. This procedure will depend on house policies and procedures.
2.4 Identify rooms to be cleaned for the shift
Introduction
In order to service rooms in a timely fashion and to control labour costs, every property will allocate
specific rooms to individual staff for room preparation duties.
You may be regularly involved in preparing rooms on the same floor or floors, or you may be required to
prepare any rooms in the establishment as occupancy levels dictate and as required on the basis of
things such as staff absenteeism.
The primary role of a room attendant is to clean rooms.
Most room attendants are required to clean approximately 12-20
rooms a day depending on:
 Organisation standards
 Types of rooms
 Status of the room
 Other considerations.
 These points will be discussed in more detail in this section.
Housekeeping briefing session
At the beginning of each shift, most housekeeping departments will
hold a short staff briefing session.
This session is an opportunity for the Head Housekeeper to:
 Verify the staff who have attended for work
 Discuss up-coming information that is of relevance – such as future occupancy levels for certain
dates, special events, Very Important People (VIPs) who are expected
 Address room servicing problems – by discussing the results of room inspections undertaken by
Floor Housekeepers or Head Housekeepers that have identified instances of sub-standard
cleaning
 The discussion will identify what the problem was, re-state what the standards are and remind
staff of what needs to be done to achieve the required standard
 Address complaints received by guests in relation to the preparation of their rooms – this can
include complaints about poor cleaning, lack of supplies or equipment that are not working
properly
 Identify up-coming training sessions and known staff absences
 Allocate rooms to individual staff for the shift – this usually takes the form a print-out of rooms
that indicates (sometimes by name, sometimes by colour-coded highlighter) which staff are
responsible for which rooms.
These print-outs are either generated by Reception as a Housekeeper’s Report, or generated by the
Head Housekeeper on the basis of information provided by Reception that indicates the rooms where
guests are leaving and the rooms where they are staying.
 Every room attendant receives their own print-out
 It is not standard practice to be verbally informed of the rooms they are required to clean.
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The briefing session is also an opportunity for housekeeping staff to raise any issues they have relating
to their role, problems they are encountering, things they have identified that could impact on guest
service delivery etc.
Organizational standards
Each organisation will have their own expectations on how long it will take to clean a room. This is
commonly based on the following points, but also takes into consideration the actual cleaning activities
to be performed.
Types of rooms
Generally it is ‘guest rooms’ that will need to be prepared. These rooms can include:
 Single rooms
 Doubles
 Twins
 Suites.
These rooms can contain their own spaces that require servicing such as:
 Bathroom
 Bedroom
 Lounge/living area
 Kitchen/kitchenette
 Balcony area
 Lobby or vestibule.
Status of room
The Head Housekeeper (known also as the Executive Housekeeper) or their appointed associate
generally distributes the list of rooms to be cleaned.
There are usually two types of rooms that need to be cleaned:
Check out rooms
These are the rooms where guests are expected to check-out. They may be known as ‘departing rooms’,
‘going rooms’ or ‘vacated rooms’.
These rooms will take longer to clean than a room that continues to be occupied because a full service is
required. Approximately thirty minutes is allocated.
The actual time required will depend on:
 The size of the room
 The furniture, features and facilities in the room
 The condition the room has been left in by the departing
guests
 The standards that the property has relating to room
preparation.
Occupied rooms
These are rooms where the guest will be staying for another night.
They may also be known as ‘stay rooms’.
Generally these rooms won’t take as long to clean as a check-out
room, and approximately twenty minutes will be allocated.
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Vacant rooms
You will also be required to inspect and provide basic service to vacant rooms.
Vacant rooms are rooms that are not being used and which have been prepared ready for sale by
Reception.
These rooms, even though not being used, still require some attention such as:
 Inspection – to identify anything that might have happened or gone wrong with or in the room
 General dusting
 Flushing of the toilet
 Checking that the refrigerator is working properly
 Ensuring the room has not been occupied by a guest for whom no
information exists.
Other considerations
When your rooms are allocated to you may also be advised in relation to:
 Which rooms need to be cleaned first – some rooms may have had a
special request from a staying guest to have their room serviced
quickly or by a certain time
 Special cleaning tasks or stain removal tasks for certain rooms –
based on yesterday’s inspection of the room by the Executive
Housekeeper
 Time constraints that apply – there is nearly always pressure on
room attendants not just to do their job and do it properly but also to do it quickly or as fast as
possible
 Other areas in the venue that need to be cleaned – such as public areas, offices.
It is vital for you to follow your allocated room list/work schedule precisely, or rooms that need to be
cleaned may be missed and timelines that need to be met may be missed.
Identifying the rooms to be serviced
Which rooms are cleaned first?
You need to check with your employer for their preferences in this regard but the general rule is that the
departing rooms are cleaned before the stay rooms.
This is to allow the check-out rooms to be placed back on the board by
Reception for sale to guests and to enable guests with bookings to be shown
directly to their rooms rather than have them wait while the room is readied,
or be re-roomed.
You can be contacted during your shift and asked to clean a specific room
immediately as the guest is waiting at Reception for their room.
You can be contacted during your shift and asked to attend a certain room and
perform supplementary cleaning duties. These may be required because the
initial room preparation was not up to standard or because there has been an
accident or spillage in the room that requires immediate attention.
You must always respect ‘Do Not Disturb’ (DND) signs. Where a ‘Do Not
Disturb’ sign has been displayed on a room throughout your entire shift you
must notify the Head Housekeeper of this so they can take the appropriate action.
There may not be a problem, but a check may be made to ensure that the guest is not ill.
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‘Please Make Up My Room’ signs can provide some guidance as to what rooms can be cleaned. It is
standard procedure to clean these stay rooms before trying to clean stay rooms that do not display this
sign.
You should monitor use of rooms that are shown on your list as ’Vacant’. If you see guests using these
rooms then the relevant internal procedures must be followed.
These may include notifying the Floor Housekeeper or head Housekeeper, notifying Reception or
notifying Security.
It is not your job to challenge guests who are using these rooms. Not only is this rude as the person
could be a legitimate walk-in guest who has just been checked in and roomed, but it may jeopardise
your personal safety.
You may be required to check guest numbers in occupied rooms – for example, you may be required to
advise Reception or Housekeeping if a room designated as ‘S’’ (single appears to be occupied by two or
more people).
2.5 Access and enter guest room appropriately
Introduction
All guest rooms must only be accessed after following the house procedures that apply.
These procedures relate to service delivery and security.
They also function to help avoid embarrassment to both guests and staff.
Keys and cards
Keys or cards (using magnetic-stripe or RFID technology) are commonly used to access guest rooms.
RFID means Radio Frequency Identification Device. It is used to identify information on a hotel room key
card. The RFID device (in the door) serves the same purpose as a bar code or a magnetic strip on the
back of a credit card or ATM card. It provides a unique code for that object. And, just as a bar code or
magnetic strip must be scanned to get the information, the RFID device must be scanned to retrieve the
identifying information.
Keys or cards can be produced to open one or more doors. For the purpose of this manual the term ‘key’
will refer to either a key or card.
Commonly the following are produced:
 Guest key– provides access to guest’s rooms and some restricted
public areas
 Floor master key– opens every door on a particular floor or in a
particular corridor
 Department-specific master – opens every door in the housekeeping
area
 Venue master – opens every door in the property.
Room attendants usually receive a Floor master key. Where cards are used
they may be issued with a wristband instead of a card.
Security
After the room attendant has signed for their keys, they are responsible for their security until returned
to the housekeeping department, and signed back in. The room attendant should never let the key out
of their sight.
The key must never be lent to another room attendant, employee or guest without the correct official
authorisation.
Keys should never leave the premises.
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Keys must never be used to let a guest into their room. This is one of the oldest tricks used by thieves!
“Oh dear, I’ve forgotten my key. Would you please let me in to my room?”
Accessing rooms
Every establishment will have its own standard procedures for accessing and entering a guest room.
Even if these are not provided in writing, they will nonetheless exist in practice. You must find out what
applies where you work and adhere to their protocols.
The process for entering a room listed on your work sheet as a Vacant room or a Departed room should
be the same as for entering a Stay room. Just in case someone is in the room: we don’t want to disturb
or embarrass anyone in any room just be entering without notice or entering with almost no notice.
Standard procedure to access rooms
The following describes the procedures for entering a guest room:
 Knock on door (quite loudly) – use knuckles not keys or any other item as it could mark the door
and call out, “Housekeeping!”
 Count to five
 If no answer, knock again, and then use your key to enter
 Take one step into the room and announce out “Good morning/afternoon, Housekeeping to
service your room.”
 If the guest is still in bed, undressed or distressed, quickly and quietly leave the room
 If the guest is awake and up, say “Housekeeping, would you like your room serviced?”
 Comply with their request – you may be invited to service the room, just do a quick tidy, replace
the towels, soap and leave, or asked to come back at a later time
 Once you have gained access to the room, the door should be left wide open – to provide notice
to a returning guest that someone is in their room
 The trolley should be parked across the entrance, or near the entrance to the room (according
to house policy). This allows the Floor Housekeeper or other
management staff to identify where room attendants are and
makes it easier to obtain items from the trolley
 It is standard procedure in the majority of establishments for
trolleys to be left outside the room being cleaned, and never to be
taken inside a guest room
 Where the trolley is allowed to be taken into the room, a large sign
should be placed outside the door, reading ‘Cleaning in Progress’.
This prevents the guest from returning to their room and being
startled to find an employee in there and again to enable easy
location of staff by management.
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3 MAKE BEDS
3.1 Strip and re-make bed with fresh bed linen
Introduction
 Once you have successfully entered the room, it is now time to
start cleaning the room.
 Usually one of the first tasks is to make the beds.
 Beds will need to be stripped in all departing rooms and at
nominated intervals for staying guests.
 Standard procedures for this process will apply in every
establishment as this is one of the most common tasks that
room attendants are required to perform.
 Bed making tasks give rise to many injuries to staff and some
properties use two room attendants to service each room so
that, amongst other things, bed-making tasks can be completed with less chance of injury.
When should the bed be stripped?
House policy will dictate what applies and there is usually a connection between the service provided
and the room rate being charged.
Options include:
 Daily – in high-priced rooms, prestige establishments: full change
 Every second or third day – full change
 Change when the condition of the linen requires it – such as situations where linen is dirty or
damaged.
Some properties will replace nothing if the guest is a short stay – which may be defined as three nights
or less. In this case, a guest who is known to be checking out after three days may not have their bed
linen changed even though standard practice is to change bed linen every two days.
Some properties use fitted bottom sheets but where they are not used, you may be required every day
or second day to remove the bottom sheet, use the top sheet as the bottom sheet and fit a fresh top
sheet.
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Stripping a bed
The room attendant should follow house procedures to strip a bed. These can be individual to the
property depending on whether one or two staff are being used, and what linen is involved.
The following is a representative guide of what is involved:
1. Remove bedspread or duvet. – inspect and air, or replace as
required. All bedspreads etc are washed or dry-cleaned periodically
2. Remove blankets (where provided) - inspect and air, or replace as
required. All blankets are washed or dry-cleaned periodically
3. Remove pillowcases – place into soiled linen bag. Inspect pillow and
pillow protectors to determine if they require attention or
replacement
4. Remove sheets - place into soiled linen bag
5. Check mattress protector – spot clean as necessary or replace if
required due to staining or damage
6. Inspect electric blanket – safety check and for signs of staining. Replace as per house protocols.
Items that have been stripped from the bed should not be placed on the floor. Check what applies in
your establishment but options include placing them on chairs, tables, couches in the room.
Not only does it look bad for guests to see these items on the floor if they enter the room while you are
cleaning it, or they walk past the door on the and look in) but it is also unhygienic.
Damaged or soiled bed items
When damaged items are found they must be replaced, with the damaged item either forwarded to the
appropriate department for repair or by notifying the appropriate person so that they can pick it up.
If damage appears intentional contact your supervisor so that a decision can be made about charging
the guest for the damage.
Where what appears to be deliberate soiling of items has occurred, the same procedure applies. A
similar arrangement may also apply where ‘excess’ mess is left by guests.
There are many approaches taken by different establishments to the removal of stains in guest rooms.
Some properties will require you to remove the stained item replace it and forward it to the Laundry or
some other nominated department for their attention
Some venues will ask you to identify what the stain is and follow their established guidelines for stain
removal.
Other establishments will ask you to involve the Head Housekeeper and obtain their advice about what
to do.
Types of stains
Common stains found on carpets, mattresses, bed linen and chairs and couches made with fabric are:
 Urine and faeces
 Blood
 Beverage – tea, soft drinks, alcohol of all types
 Shoe polish
 Food
 Mud, dirt, grease and oil.
What action may be taken?
The first step is to develop the ability to identify the stain. Trial and
error coupled with some coaching from experienced staff are the
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keys to this.
You cannot expect to effectively treat a stain unless you have correctly identified what has caused the stain.
In most cases a stain will require bed linen to be exchanged for fresh items. There are virtually no
occasions when spot-cleaning of these items is appropriate for room attendants.
Where spot cleaning appears suitable, the appropriate cleaner from those stocked on the trolley is
selected and applied according to manufacturer’s instructions, which can commonly be via a spray
bottle applicator, or rubbed directly onto the stain.
The stained area is then rubbed/brushed to remove the stain, rinsed and then
dried.
Most establishments will have a chart to guide in the removal of stains. These
charts are specific to the chemicals provided by the chemical supplier being used
at the property, and will identify which cleaner is to be used for which stain on
which fabric or surface, together with how to apply the cleaner, and other relevant
tips and information.
Remember that the ‘correct’ action to take when dealing with stains will depend on interaction of:
 The type of material where the stain has occurred
 The cause of the stain
 The chemicals available to remove the stain.
This essentially means that providing generic advice on stain removal is not only impossible, but
potentially misleading as it can prove dangerous, damaging and expensive.
You need to know to the best extent possible:
 What the material or surface is that has been stained
 What the stain is
 What chemical options you have for treatment.
Remaking bed with fresh linen
As with stripping of beds, individual properties have their own standards, procedures and requirements
for making beds.
Making beds is a common activity that needs to be practiced and undertaken with great care as many
injuries have resulted from moving the bed in order to make it.
The importance of bed making
Making the bed ‘properly’ is an extremely important part of servicing
any room because the bed is often the focal point of the room and one
of the first things in the room that the guest looks at.
The final appearance of the made bed must therefore make the right
impression – neat, tidy, balanced, crisp, clean, attractive and inviting.
Special points in relation to final presentation of the bed can include:
 The use of an overlay placed across the end of the bed to
enhance eye appeal
 Number of pillows provided – standard procedure may be to
place only one pillow per person on the bed with additional
pillows available in the wardrobe of the room for guests to help themselves to: in a stay room, if
the guest has used two pillows per person then the bed should be re-made following their
preference
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



Use of decorator pillows – to enhance presentation
Placement of the pillows – the property may lie the pillows down, stand them up or arrange
them in some unique way
Number of blankets used – most properties use one blanket on a bed with extra blankets
available in the wardrobe or on request
Placement of a complimentary item on the bed – this may be
done as part of the turn-down procedures but may also be a
standing requirement when servicing the room.
Bed making styles
Your workplace may have its own bed making style but there are three
styles of bed making commonly used in the hospitality industry:
Standard style
This uses:
1. Mattress protector
2. Bottom sheet
3. Top sheet
4. Blanket
5. Bedspread
6. Pillows
7. Pillowcases.
American style
This features:
1. Mattress protector
2. Bottom sheet
3. Top sheet
4. Bedspread
5. Pillows
6. Pillowcases.
Norwegian style
This uses:
1. Mattress protector
2. Bottom sheet
3. Quilt
4. Quilt protector
5. Quilt cover
6. Pillows
7. Pillowcases.
8. Electric blankets are used in some hotels and where they are fitted, the electric blanket security
straps must be checked to ensure the blanket is straight and in place.
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4: CLEAN BATHROOM
4.1 Clean bath and shower area
Servicing the bathroom
Before a bathroom can be cleaned it, too, must be prepared.
The following steps should be taken to prepare a bathroom for cleaning:
 Collect all dirty towelling items and place in soiled laundry bag
 Collect all used bathroom supplies – shampoo, conditioner and soap
 Check shower curtain for cleanliness – remove if soiled
 Check all light globes
 Check all electrical equipment for damage or faults
 Check all fixtures and fittings for damage or defects.
 All damage, faults and defects should be reported to the floor
supervisor or the Maintenance department.
Handling syringes
If you find a syringe, the following steps should be taken to remove
it safely.
1. Don’t panic.
2. Don’t touch the needle with bare hands and do not
attempt to recap it.
3. Find a sturdy plastic container.
4. Ease the syringe into the container without making skin contact
with it – where applicable, use a brush and shovel to sweep
syringe up.
5. Tightly seal the container.
6. Immediately wash your hands.
7. Immediately
ly alert the appropriate person for correct disposal
of syringe.
8. Check house policies and procedures for the removal of
syringes, and follow them where they differ from the above.
Cleaning the bath
Always wear protective gloves when cleaning a bath.
Take extra care when cleaning baths as this task has been a cause of
many workplace injuries for room attendants.
The following applies:
1. Wet tub with water and check plughole for foreign matter
2. Scour tub using non-metal
metal pad – removing stains, residue and
marks
3. Clean and polish taps
4. Rinse bath thoroughly
5. Dry and polish with cloth
6. Conduct final inspection.
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Cleaning the shower
Always wear protective gloves when cleaning a shower.
The shower can be effectively cleaned as follows:
1. Wet shower basin and sides.
2. Clean tiles and floor – check plughole for foreign matter.
3. Clean shower curtain – check pole is clean and all hooks are in place and working.
4. Rinse walls and floor thoroughly.
5. Polish fittings.
6. Replenish supplies – shampoo, conditioner and soap
7. Conduct final inspection – leave shower curtain neat and to one side
4.2 Clean toilets
Introduction
Cleaning the toilet is not the most appealing of jobs, but ensuring it is hygienically clean is vital. A hotel
can provide the best of products and services however if the toilet is unclean, all of the best efforts are
wasted.
Therefore attention to detail when cleaning toilets is important.
Firstly, it is important to remember to always wear protective gloves when cleaning a toilet.
Steps to clean the toilet
The following steps are effective when:
1. Flush toilet to wet sides of bowl
2. Pour in cleanser – leave to soak: continue with other work
3. Wash lid and dry – both sides and near back hinges
4. Wash seat and dry – both sides and near back hinges
5. Wash outsides of the bowl and dry
6. Wash and dry water holding unit and polish button
7. Scour bowl thoroughly – use a toilet brush
8. Flush toilet a number of times to wash away dirt and residue
9. Place a hygiene strip over the closed toilet lid
10. Conduct final inspection – leave lid down when thoroughly
cleaned. Add hygiene strip, if appropriate.
It is essential that any evidence of past guests are removed. Take a
second to recheck that the toilet is clean. This includes the lid and
seats, on both sides.
It is also important to ensure any chemicals are removed from toilet
surfaces as this cause discomfort if coming in contact with the skin of
guests.
4.3 Clean vanity area
Introduction
The vanity area is normally the most used area in a bathroom and is
used for a variety of tasks by guests. Most of their personal bathroom items are stored there.
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The vanity area normally includes:
1. Bathroom bench
2. Basins
3. Taps
4. Mirror
5. Cupboards
6. Handtowels
7. Amenities
8. Soap containers.
Cleaning the vanity area in a check-out room is easier than that in an occupied room, because of the
presence of the guest’s toiletry items.
Cleaning the vanity area
Always wear protective gloves when cleaning the vanity area.
The recommended steps are:
1. Clean and dry shelves – replacing guest’s toiletries, where applicable
2. Scrub hand basin, rinse, then dry and polish with clean cloth – check plughole
3. Polish fittings and taps
4. Clean and dry wall tiles
5. Clean, dry and polish bench top
6. Clean and polish mirror
7. Check under vanity for cleanliness – cobwebs, etc
8. Replenish stock – soap, tissues, facial items, shower caps,
water
9. Replenish towels – bath, face, hand, and floor mats
10. Conduct final check.
Remember to always try to place guest’s personal items where you found them.
4.4 Clean Floors
Introduction
Bathroom floors can become very dirty places and therefore it is
important they are cleaned correctly and thoroughly.
Dirt and dust, hairsprays, soaps and shampoos used within the confines
of the bathroom dirt will cause messy floor surfaces. Tiled floors are
appealing when they're clean and sparkling, it doesn't take much to
sully them. Dirt and grime trapped between the tiles and marring the
appearance of the grout can make your entire bathroom feel unclean. Keeping
the tiled bathroom floor is essential not only for keeping your bathroom looking
good, but for good hygiene reasons as well.
Steps to cleaning bathroom floors
1. Remove everything that may be on the bathroom floor such as mats,
trash cans, and small pieces of furniture
2. Sweep the floor to remove dirt, hair, dust, and other debris
3. Dissolve detergent into warm water using the manufacturer's
instructions for the correct water to detergent ratio
4. Pour the solution over the entire floor so that the solution can fill into the grout lines
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5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
Allow the solution to remain on the floor for
fo 15 to 20 minutes
Scrub the grout with a small medium-bristled
medium
brush
Rinse the floor with a mop dampened with clean water
Mix a second batch of detergent and water
Mop the entire floor with the fresh solution
Rinse the mop with clean water and mop a second
second time over the floor to rinse it
Use a squeegee to push residual moisture to one area of the floor before absorbing it with dry
towels.
4.5 Replenish guest supplies
Replenish guest supplies
It is important that all guest supplies are replenished in the bathroom.
Some of the supplies that are required in a guest room include:
1. Toilet paper and sanitary pads and bags
2. Tissues
3. Towels including hand towels, face cloths, bathmats, bath
towels
4. Shampoo
5. Conditioner
6. Moisturiser
7. Hand lotion
8. Toothbrushes and toothpaste
9. Make up remover
10. Combs
11. Water
12. Soap
13. Perfumes, aftershaves and other fragrances
14. Sewing kits.
Every organisation will have different supplies that must be included in a bathroom. It is important you
know what these are. As on the list above, there can
ca be quite a variety of products.
Final check of bathroom
Before leaving the bathroom, do a final check noting the following
points:
1. Bathroom looks clean and tidy
2. Towels and guest supplies have been replenished and stocked
accordingly
3. Toilet paper is well-stocked
stocked
4. All appliances are working
5. All surfaces are clean and dry.
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5: CLEAN ROOM
5.1 Follow in-house requirements and policies in relation to room cleaning
Introduction
Housekeeping has an extensive list of requirements and policies relating to what tasks a room attendant
should perform and how they should be performed.
The different sections in this manual will explain in detail the correct steps required in cleaning different
aspects of a room, however a ‘correct order’ for cleaning must be determined.
Cleaning in the correct order
All guest rooms that are allocated to you must be cleaned in the correct order.
The ‘correct order’ may be determined as a result of one or more of the following:
 As directed by the Executive Housekeeper
 As requested by guests
 So that vacated rooms can be put back on the (Front Office) board for sale/occupancy as soon as
possible.
Factors impacting on the ‘correct order’
In some cases, room attendants from different floors may be required to go
to a nominated floor and combine their efforts to clean rooms on that floor
where, for example, a group has just vacated the rooms on that floor and
another group is expected in to fill them.
This will delay the cleaning of their allocated rooms on their floors.
In other cases, guests may be late checking out so the ‘going rooms’ may not
be able to be cleaned when anticipated.
There will be guests who affect your intended order of cleaning rooms by
displaying a ‘Do Not Disturb’ sign on their door.
This highlights that there is never any strict ‘correct order’ because of the fluid
and unpredictable nature of the business and the guests who use the accommodation: there may be a
preferred order but this rarely translates into what actually happens.
Minimising disruption to guests
When cleaning rooms you must always strive to keep the disruption caused to guests to an absolute
minimum.
Cleaning duties can disrupt guests:
1. As a result of noise caused during the cleaning activities and
when moving about ion the corridors
2. By providing a physical obstruction to them when they are
moving about the corridors etc
3. Through unwanted interruption to their activities in the room
when you knock to offer ‘Housekeeping’.
Ways to minimise disruption to guests
When you understand the causes of a problem you are better placed to solve the problem, so practical
ways in which to minimise interruptions to guests are:
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1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Always respect ‘Do Not Disturb’ signs
Keep noise when moving around the floor to a minimum
Converse quietly with other staff and guests
Avoid knocking equipment into things
Keep trolleys and equipment away from guest traffic areas
Always allow guests right of way in a corridor or lift.
Remember too that guests do not always keep regular hours. Room guests may have flown in
on a late flight and be sleeping in or they may have had a late night.
8. Other room guests may be using their room for business purposes and not want to be
disturbed.
Preparing guest room prior to cleaning
When you have entered the guest room following the steps described in later sections which will
provide a guide as to what should take place in order to clean a room.
Remember, where the house procedures are different to the following guidelines, always adhere to your
enterprise procedures.
Cleaning a Check-out room
If the guest is still there after check-out time and in the process of leaving, use your discretion about
whether to leave and come back later, or whether to excuse yourself and begin cleaning.
In situations where Reception is expecting a quick turn-around of rooms due to full occupancy it may be
acceptable to begin cleaning a check-out room while the guest is still there if they have passed the
advertised check-out time and no late check-out has been arranged.
In a check-out room the following procedures are applicable:
1. Turn on all lights and check the bulbs – replace where
necessary
2. Open all blinds and curtains
3. Open windows or doors to let in fresh air – if applicable, and
if weather permits
4. Turn off fridge for defrosting purposes and leave door open
– if applicable
5. Collect and remove dirty towels, dishes, bottles and rubbish
- any broken glass should be wrapped safely in newspaper
or similar
6. Remove any room service trays and cover them with a
napkin as exposed stale food is not a pleasant sight. These
trays are usually placed in the corridor outside the room for collection by the porter or room
service staff.
Preparing a room for cleaning
As soon as you have completed the above tasks the cleaning
proper can begin. This procedure should be the same for every
room.
Following a standard procedure and routine helps to avoid any
areas being missed, and is more time effective.
The exact detail of how to complete each of these steps will be
detailed through the manual.
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Although the exact procedure may vary from establishment to establishment, there are eleven general
steps to cleaning any guest room.
Where your premises vary from these, adhere to house policy:
1. Enter and prepare room
2. Strip and make bed
3. Clear and clean bathroom
4. Replenish all bathroom supplies
5. Dust and polish
6. Replenish guest supplies
7. Clean bins
8. Clean fridge
9. Vacuum
10. Deodorise
11. Do a final inspection.
Cleaning an occupied room
Key points to remember when cleaning an occupied room:
1. Never throw out any items like magazines and newspapers belonging to the guest, no matter
how old they are
2. Always replace items where they were found
3. If business papers are out on the desk or table and obviously being used, avoid cleaning or
tidying that area, apart from emptying the waste paper bin
4. Respect the guest’s privacy and don’t be nosy
5. Take special care with all guest’s items
6. Hang guest’s clothing up appropriately
7. All cloths used in cleaning should be housekeeping issued – room towels and linen should never
be used for cleaning but check your house practices relating to the use of bath towels for drying
bathroom areas.
For detailed information how to perform different tasks by a room attendant when cleaning a room
please refer to the appropriate section in this manual.
5.2 Clean fixtures and fittings
Introduction
All rooms will have furniture, fixtures and fittings to some extent.
These relate to all the items in the room that may be used by a guest during their stay.
Furniture commonly refers to items in the room that are movable
including beds, couches, desks, television, clock radios etc.
Fixtures refer to items that are attached that are used by the
guest including air conditioning and light switches.
Fittings refer to taps, pipes and electrical aspects of the room.
This section will explain some methods used to clean fixtures and
fittings.
Dusting and polishing
The main purpose of dusting is to collect small particles of dust.
The main purpose of polishing is to clean the item and leave a shiny, reflecting finish.
Dusting may be done with a duster or a damp lint-free cloth.
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It is important to use common sense when choosing which piece of equipment to dust with. Don’t use a
damp cloth if the moisture could ruin the object being cleaned and remember to change the cloth when
soiled.
Your on-the-job training, which will probably include being teamed up with an experienced room
attendant for a period of time, will provide the workplace guidance you need in this regard.
When polishing an item, make sure to:
 Spray the cleaning agent onto the cloth - not onto the surface
to be cleaned
 Buff the surface after cleaning to remove any streaks.
 When dusting and polishing a room, it is best to start in one
spot and work around the room, say, in a clockwise direction.
This routine should be followed in every room. Some small
items may need to be picked up in order to dust or polish
underneath.
 The following areas will need either dusting or polishing. Some will need cleaning on a daily
basis, while others may only need to be cleaned weekly.
Remember that check-out rooms will need more intensive cleaning
than occupied rooms, however all rooms must be cleaned to
establishment standards, including the following:
1. Air conditioning vents
2. Doors – including top ledge and handles
3. Picture frames – facing glass as well as frame
4. Mirrors – frame and mirror
5. Skirting boards
6. Dressing table and drawers
7. Side tables and ledges
8. Wardrobe and internal shelving
9. Windows – glass and frames
10. Window sills
11. Walls – check for cobwebs and marks
12. Lamps – base, shade and cord
13. Telephone – main unit and hand receiver
14. Seat furniture – don’t forget to remove cushions and check sides, legs, back and underneath
15. All furniture – top, sides, legs, and underneath each item; don’t forget to clean inside the drawers
16. Outside/balcony areas – furniture, ash trays.
Cleaning bins
You should always wear protective gloves when cleaning the bin and should be extra careful when
handling the bin as many hazardous items may have been thrown out
by the guest – such as broken glass, razor blades and syringes.
Always be vigilant for items that could cause any health or safety risk.
Broken glassware or bottles should be wrapped up in newspaper and
disposed of separately and safely.
Waste bins should be properly cleaned by:
1. Tying the bin liner around the rubbish or emptying the bin
directly into your waste bag on the trolley
2. Spraying bin with appropriate multi-purpose cleaner, inside
and out
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3. Cleaning with the appropriate cloth
4. Fitting a new bin liner in the manner approved by the establishment.
5.3 Vacuum floors and other areas
Introduction
All carpeted areas should be vacuumed and many non-carpeted areas
including wooden floors, tiled bathroom area, linoleum floors in
kitchenette may also require vacuuming.
It is essential that all surfaces are clean and free from dirt, dust and other
items.
Vacuuming
Any stains on carpeted areas should be removed using the appropriate stain removal method for your
property that relates specifically to the type of carpet, the active ingredients of the chemical and the
type of stain. Where this does not remove the stain, a maintenance report may need to be completed or
the supervisor notified.
 Try to vacuum the room starting at the furthest corner from
the door and work back toward the exit.
 Ensure you vacuum around and under all furniture, and under
the bed.
 Particular attention should be given to the corners of the room,
including the skirting boards.
 To avoid injury when vacuuming, bend your knees when
cleaning under items.
 Try to avoid ‘bending over’ the machine. Keep it behind you
where possible, moving it forward as you vacuum from a point furthest from the room entry
door towards the entrance door of the room.
5.4 Clean kitchenette area, where applicable
Introduction
Some venues may have a kitchenette included in the accommodation. This may come in various shapes
or forms and have different inclusions.
In apartment and self-catering style accommodation, the products
included might be detailed and include:
1. Refrigerator
2. Cook top and oven
3. Microwave oven
4. Dishwasher
5. Tea and coffee making facilities
6. Pots and pans
7. Crockery and cutlery
8. Clothes washer and dryer.
9. This section will explore the best way to undertake cleaning of
some of these items.
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Cleaning the refrigerator
All food items left by guests should be handled in accordance with house policy – this may mean
returning all unused items left by guests to the housekeeping office. Guests have been known to call and
inquire about their food items, which they have wanted to reclaim.
Other policies may allow you to discard any partially used food items that are found in the refrigerator
or elsewhere in a check-out room.
The refrigerator is usually cleaned on regular basis (that is, not daily but weekly or other), or on a needsonly basis.
When cleaning the refrigerator you may be required to turn it off, depending on the cleaning procedure
to be applied before the cleaning starts.
The recommended procedure is:
1. Clean the inside of the refrigerator, including seals, with either hot soapy water or a designated
spray-on cleaner. Dry with a cloth when the cleaning has been done
2. Make sure food products and glasses are protected from chemical contamination during the
cleaning process. Covering them or removing them are the only safe options. Adhere to what
applies where you work
3. Items in the refrigerator such as cold water in jugs and milk sachets should be replenished as
required. Always remember to check the ice cube trays in the freezer
4. Switch refrigerator back on if it has been turned off prior to cleaning. Set the control to the
required setting, check that the light works (replace where required – or notify Maintenance
department), and close door
5. Don’t forget to check the refrigerator door seals for splits and cracks
6. Seals found in need of repair should be reported to the floor
supervisor.
Cleaning the stove
Regardless of the type of stove you will be cleaning, always use gloves.
For a gas stove:
1. Remove burner caps, grates, and control knobs
2. Put them in your sink filled with very hot water and dishwashing
detergent
3. As these soak, dip a scrubbing sponge into the sink water and
wring
4. Go over the stovetop, paying extra attention to any stains
around the burners
5. Rinse with clean water; let dry
6. Wipe down each of the items in the sink with your sponge
7. Rinse and dry the parts; reassemble the cook top.
For an electric stove:
1. For a coil electric stovetop, do this soaking method with the drip pans and knobs but not the
burners, which shouldn't be submerged and are self-cleaning
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2. For a smooth electric stovetop, clean the surface with a nonabrasive scrubbing pad and a liquid
cook top cleaner. Finally, dip a sponge in hot soapy water, wring well, and wipe the controls.
Rinse and let dry.
Cleaning the oven
Inside oven
Cooked food stuck on the bottom, sides or glass of ovens can give off odours and smoke.
1. Try to remove large or deep stuck food items with a metal
spatula and gently chip off any loose pieces
2. Spray a cleaning agent on all sides on the inside or an oven
3. Wipe away
4. For hard to remove stains, use baking soda with a few drops
of white vinegar. Let it bubble for a minute or two, and then
whisk away the grime with a scrub sponge
5. Rinse with a clean, wet, regular sponge.
Oven glass window
1. Spray the inside of the window with appropriate cleaning agent
2. Let it soak
3. After a few minutes, rub down the glass with a nonabrasive scrubbing pad
4. Rinse with a wet sponge, and dry with a paper towel or microfiber cloth
5. Give the glass on the outside of the door a quick spray and wipe as well.
Cleaning dishwashers, washing machines and dryers
These pieces of equipment usually self clean on the inside, due to their method of operation. However it
is important that they are not only clean but safe to use.
Wash the outside of the appliance, removing stains, dirt and dust.
Dishwashers
When cleaning dishwashers, ensure:
1. That all items have been removed and placed away in cupboards
2. That any water inside has drained away
3. To clean around area where detergent has been used
4. To fill the rinse aid dispenser, if fitted.
Washing machines
When cleaning washing machines, ensure:
1. That they are empty
2. That if items are found in a machine, they are processed as lost
property if the guest has departed, or neatly laid out for a stay
over guest
3. To clear away any leftover clothing strands from inside the
machine.
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Dryers
When cleaning dryers, ensure:
1. That they are empty
2. That if items are found, they are processed as lost property if the guest
has departed, or neatly folded for a stay over guest
3. To Clear away lint from filters and catchment areas.
Cleaning other items
Once the major pieces of equipment have been cleaned there are other tasks to
perform. These may include:
1. Washing and drying pots, pans, crockery and cutlery
2. Placing clean items in cupboards
3. Cleaning inside cupboards and doors
4. Refilling ice trays
5. Cleaning kettles
6. Restocking complimentary items such as tea,
coffee and biscuits
7. Changing drying towels and cleaning sponges
8. Replenishing detergents, washing powder and
cleaning agents
9. Placing fresh milk in the fridge or other items
as dictated by regulations
10. Cleaning the microwave
11. Wiping down benches and sinks
12. Cleaning the floor.
13. Follow organisational SOP’s when performing these tasks.
14. Depending on the organisation, other items may also be restocked or stored.
15. When you have finished cleaning the kitchen, have a final look
to ensure it is clean, tidy, dry and fully stocked.
5.5 Replenish guest supplies
Introduction
Guest supplies are an important part of many guest’s stay with a property, and an on-going source of
concern for venue owners and managers.
The best advice in relation to them is ‘find out what the rules are … and stick to them’.
What are ‘guest supplies’?
Depending on the establishment, there can be a number of items that will qualify
as guest supplies.
The simplest definition is ‘any small item that can be used, and in some cases
taken, by a guest is a guest supply’.
Examples include:
Compendium items
1. Pens
2. Paper
3. Stationery
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4. Envelopes
5. Fax or e-mail forms
6. Promotional material
7. Room service menus – in traditional menu format and doorknob hangers
8. Sewing and shoe polishing kits
9. Guest dry-cleaning bag
10. Guest laundry list
11. Tea, coffee, milk and biscuits
12. Iron
13. Fly spray
14. Additional blankets and pillows
15. Remote control units
16. Hair dryer
17. Electric jug
18. Basic cups, mugs, saucers, glasses, tea-spoons, bottle opener.
As mentioned in a previous section, where the room has a kitchen/kitchenette, the concept of room
supplies expands enormously to include:
1. A set number and range of cutlery and crockery
2. Pots, pans and general cooking utensils
3. Cleaning materials – detergent, scourers, cloths etc
4. Serving plates and bowls.
Room supply basics
An integral part of preparing a guest room involves checking, replenishing or
replacing room supplies.
Set numbers for these giveaway items are set by management and these
must be adhered to. This is to control costs.
Despite this set quantity of give-aways per room, most properties give
room attendants discretionary power to issue extras of certain items
including tea, coffee, shower caps and shampoo to guests on request.
Check what applies where you work and adhere to it.
If the control of give-aways is a critical issue for management, it is
necessary to locate these items on your trolley in such as way that
discourages unauthorised acquisition by guests. This can mean locating
them on the trolley so they are not easily seen and less of a temptation.
Room supplies are for guest rooms, not for private use by staff. Using
these items at work or taking them home for your personal use is theft.
Tea, coffee and sugar items as well as shampoos and conditioners must always be checked because
these are items that guests seem to take with them even if they don’t use them
in-room.
Pens and pads are a close second.
A double-check should be made when replenishing these items to ensure that
other items have not gone missing – such as cups, saucers, bottle openers,
glasses and batteries from the remote controls.
5.6 Check operational readiness of all items and equipment
Introduction
Enterprise standards as they apply to preparing rooms for guests can relate to issues such as:
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1. Physical placement of items in the room
2. Levels of cleanliness and tidiness
3. Time allocated for servicing different types of rooms – for example, the time allocated for
cleaning a standard double check-out room, as opposed to the
time allocated for servicing a suite that is staying on
4. Number of guest supplies of each type to be replenished
5. Re-setting items in the room
6. Checking the operational readiness of items.
7. This Section addresses the physical placement, resetting and
checking the operational ability of items in a guest room
Checking operational readiness
When cleaning a check-out room, there will be standards for checking
the operational readiness of items.
These standards aim to achieve uniformity and consistency across the
establishment.
Even small things can be subject to these resetting standards. For
example, some properties will require the telephone to be placed in the
cradle a certain way and the telephone cord to fall to a nominated side
of the unit.
In stay rooms, house policies may require that the settings set by the
guest are allowed to remain (with the possible exception of air
conditioning temperatures).
For example, in an occupied room if the guest has light dimmers on a
certain setting, the television on a certain channel and the volume of the
radio at a certain setting – leave them as they are.
By comparison if the room is a departing room, things will need to be
checked and where necessary re-set to the house standard settings.
Items included in this aspect of room servicing will include:
1. In-room air conditioning set at a predetermined temperature level
2. Refrigerator left at a nominated setting
3. Television set to a particular volume or channel
4. Clock set to the correct time
5. Alarm clock checked to ensure the alarm is not active
6. Radio tuned to nominated channel and set at desired volume
7. Dimmers set to medium setting
8. Toaster set to desired setting
9. Pens and message pads are located conveniently as required – next to bed, near telephone. All
pads and pens should be laid in identical position throughout the venue.
10. It is vital that all items in the room are:
11. Where they are meant to be
12. In the correct quantity
13. Operationally ready.
14. There is nothing more frustrating for a guest to have to ask for and then wait for something to
be fixed, when it should have already been checked. This is even more frustrating for a guest
who has arrived on a long flight.
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5.7 Report and remedy room defects and damaged items
Introduction
Regardless of how well a room is maintained, general wear and tear will
happen, equipment will break down and other problems will occur.
It is natural and while it may be annoying, guests will have a level of
understanding. That said any problems with a room should be indentified
and rectified before a room is allocated to a guest.
Every property wants their current guests to return to them as repeat
guests and to tell their friends about how great their stay with us was so
that their friends become guests who are referred to us.
It is difficult to cultivate repeat and referral guests if their room has defects of any kind. We must always
remain very much aware that in nearly all cases ‘guests have options’. If we don’t deliver the service,
facilities, and standard that they want and expect, they can very easily stay somewhere else next time.
It can be a sobering research activity to check the local phone book and count the number of businesses
that offer accommodation, all of which are your competitors trying to take your guests and therefore
your job.
Checking for defects
Another task when servicing a guest room is to check the room for any
defects in equipment, appliances, furniture or fittings.
This inspection should also check for equipment damage.
What are defects, what is damage?
Defects or damage can result from normal wear-and-tear, accidental damage
or deliberate and malicious action by guests.
Where you suspect damage has been intentionally caused by guests and even
guests that have already checked-out, you should reports your beliefs to your supervisor and ask them
to view the damage for themselves to make a decision about what action
or claims may need to be made.
In some cases, guests may be charged for the damage and clean up costs
and placed on a ‘Do Not Room List’ that automatically flags a guest for
refusal when their name is entered into the reservation system as a result
of a query or a booking.
Defects or damage include:
1. Broken fridge door seals
2. Chipped or broken glasses
3. Flickering fluorescent lights
4. Blown light globes
5. Remote controls with flat, or no, batteries
6. Broken fixtures or fittings
7. Refrigerators that make ‘too much’ noise – which can prevent the
guest from sleeping
8. Noisy air conditioning
9. Dripping taps
10. Ripped curtains and drapes that do not properly close – allowing
others to see in and unwanted light to come into the room
11. Ripped, tired-looking or stained furnishings
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12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
Fuzzy television reception
Electric jugs and hair dryers that don’t work
Room cards that do not easily integrate with the power controls in-room
Irons where the temperature control settings are not working.
If a guest finds a defect in their room they may let you know about it but they may not.
If they don’t, we have just disappointed one guest and unless we identify the problem that has
caused this we risk disappointing every other guest who uses that room!
18. Obviously this does little to generate repeat and referral guests.
What to do?
When a defect or damage to fixtures or fittings is identified, two courses of action present themselves.
The course of action chosen will depend on the seriousness of the damage and whether or not someone
could be harmed because of the problem.
All action taken should be in accordance with enterprise procedures.
The two possible courses of action are:
1. The item must be taken out of service immediately and replaced if
possible – for example, it may be possible in the immediate shortterm to replace a hair dryer that is not working (or is missing) in an
occupied room with one from the floor housekeeping store or from
another room that shows as vacant on your room list.
2. The item is reported on a maintenance report and submitted to the
appropriate person for action to be taken – where the item presents
a physical danger to guests it must be removed from the room,
tagged as ‘Out Of Service’ according to house procedures and stored
appropriately so that it will not be returned to service before being serviced.
The motto to remember is: ‘If in doubt, have it checked out.
Record damaged items
Damaged items need to be recorded for many operational reasons.
Every property will have its own procedures for recording damaged items and room attendants are
expected to comply with these where they identify such items in any guest room, and regardless of who
damaged the items and how they were damaged.
Properties need to be aware of damaged items for the following reasons:
1. Monitoring costs
2. Determining supplies that need to be ordered
3. Evaluating the usefulness of products - and determining
whether or not to continue using a certain item or
whether a better alternative needs to be sourced
4. Identifying high damage products – to develop policies
and procedures to reduce and prevent damage
5. Removing them from service for OSH and duty of care
reasons.
Identifying damaged items
You can become aware that an item is damaged through personal observation when you service a room
– the basics are to:
1. Look for damaged items – a visual inspection such as drips
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2.
3.
4.
5.
Listen for equipment that sounds as if it is damaged or not working as intended
Be alert to smells that indicate problems – such as ‘electrical smells’
Heed advice from guests who report such problems.
Your personal experience in the workplace will build up over time to provide you with an idea of
what to look for and what items are commonly associated with damage.
Reporting the damage
Damaged or defective items must be reported so that appropriate
remedial action can be taken.
Options in reporting damage include:
1. Speaking face-to-face with the supervisor, Floor Housekeeper or
relevant other person
2. Using the in-room phone to contact and notify directly either
the maintenance department or the housekeeper. Some
properties have a ban on the use of guest room phones so check to see what applies in your
workplace
3. Using other internal communication methods (pager, mobile phone) to contact and notify
directly either the maintenance department or the housekeeper
4. Using the in-room phone to contact reception and leave a message – see above
5. Completion of a Maintenance Report identifying the damaged item, the room number, your
name, and the nature of the damage.
Identifying pests
All properties should have some form of standard and establishment-wide pest control program in
place.
This program usually combines the services of an external, professional pest control company with
regular internal efforts at pest control.
Regular checks of rooms done by the external pest control service
(with their vehicle parked around the back of the building – most
people see the presence of a pest control vehicle as evidence of a pest
problem as opposed to regarding it as prevention) should be at the
centre of this program.
Where the established pest control program has not worked
effectively and you identify pests in a guest room, immediate action
needs to be taken.
Besides being undesirable from an aesthetic point of view, pests in a
guest room can pose a serious health risk as well as present the
potential for damage to walls and wires from gnawing.
Types of pests
Pests include:
1. Flies
2. Cockroaches
3. Silverfish
4. Fleas
5. Spiders
6. Mice, rats and ants.
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Signs of the presence of pests include:
1. Seeing them
2. Hearing them
3. Seeing evidence of their presence such as droppings, spots on walls and surfaces, eggs, webs
and cocoons.
Action to take
1. The exact action to take when pests have been sighted or are suspected must be in accordance
with the house procedures that apply.
2. You may be required to deal on-the-spot with flies, ants, cockroaches and spiders using an
aerosol spray but it is important to remember that some guests may be allergic to insect sprays
so use them sparingly.
3. Make sure you remove the bodies! A dead fly or a dead mouse looks as bad as a live one.
4. Make sure you also remove any other evidence of the pests – webs, droppings.
5. Other pests may have to be notified to your supervisor, Head Housekeeper or the Maintenance
department for them to action. This notification should be immediate to enable action to be
taken as soon as possible.
Action to prevent a pest problem
An effective pest control program requires you to do whatever you can to keep
the pests out in the first place – in practice this means:
1. Keeping doors and windows to guest rooms closed
2. Making sure fly wire screens are fitted and in good condition
3. Making sure that anything provided to a guest room is free from pests
4. Control any pests you see – using aerosol sprays or other approved internal or external
methods; this can be baits, traps, fogging and commercial spraying.
Apply good housekeeping techniques to deny food and drink to pests and maintain hygienic conditions –
this includes:
1. Never leaving food out on benches or tables
2. Checking to ensure food scraps are not lying on the floor anywhere in the
room – in the kitchen under the stove; under the bed
3. Keeping bins clean and in good repair
4. Cleaning premises thoroughly and disinfecting when necessary
5. Removing all rubbish on a regular basis.
The section has highlighted the fact that problems in a guest room, whilst mostly will
comprise defects and damage to physical items, there are other issues that need to
be addressed to ensure the guest has a positive experience.
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5.8 Report suspicious items or situations
Introduction
Accommodation establishments are the setting for many illegal
activities and all room attendants must be alert for signs this is
happening or may take place.
The role of a room attendant is this regard is only to ‘report’ – it is not
to intervene, take action or put themselves in harm’s way.
Members of the public can target floors and rooms with a view to
breaking and entering. If the thief has watched their target leave the
property to go on a three-hour tour they know the target’s room will be
’safe’ for that period and it is a relatively easy target.
Other guests will use their room for illegal activities that they do not want to undertake at home.
Is the activity illegal or immoral?
Individual establishments can have different approaches this.
Most properties are not prepared to allow illegal activity and also
frown on immoral activity.
Some turn a blind eye to immoral activities deeming that what
guests do in the privacy of their own room is their business.
You need to speak to your supervisor to determine what applies
where you work and accept the position taken by the establishment:
if you ever have any concerns about differentiating between ‘illegal’
and ‘immoral’ seek guidance on the distinctions from your supervisor and be guided by them and their
experience.
Taking action
If you notice an item that looks unusual or suspicious, or see an occurrence
that is suspicious, appropriate action should be taken immediately.
The appropriate action may be spelled out in the standard Emergency Procedures for
your venue.
The action may be to:
1. Advise the floor supervisor, the Floor Housekeeper or the
Executive Housekeeper
2. Contact venue security.
3. Always adhere to workplace policies and procedures when dealing
with such matters, as they are potentially dangerous and serious.
4. An unusual item or situation may include:
5. A package left unattended in corridor or stairwells
6. An item that is heavily bloodstained
7. A package left in a check-out room
8. A weapon found in a room – whether the room is a stay room
or a departed room
9. Drugs – or packages thought to contain drugs
10. Explosives
11. Evidence of drug taking in a room – including the presence of
drug paraphernalia.
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Suspicious occurrences or people may include:
1. Person behaving nervously or anxiously in a corridor, stairwell, near a store room, in the guest
laundry etc
2. Person in an area they shouldn’t be in – such as areas members of the public in areas restricted
for ‘Staff Only’ access
3. Person using excessive force against another person
4. Loud voices and swearing
5. Sounds that indicate damage is being done
6. Person seeming to loiter on a floor, along corridors, in public
areas
7. Person asking you to let them into a room.
8. If you see or hear anything that is suspicious, unusual or
appears illegal you should:
9. Not say anything to the persons involved
10. Try not to alert them to the fact you have noticed something
suspicious or unusual.
11. Try to remember as much detail as possible – write down
notes when safe to do so
12. Alert the relevant person as soon as possible in such a way
that others (those involved and other guests) cannot hear
what is being said.
It is rare for you to have the authority to call police so you should
refrain from doing this in all but the most extreme cases of actual or
imminent danger.
5.9 Handle guest property left in room from which the guest has
departed
Introduction
From time to-time departing guests leave items in their rooms.
Sometimes this is an over-sight on their part and sometimes it is
intentional.
Regardless, all guest property found in a check-out room must be
handled in accordance with house policy.
Dealing with lost property
There may be times when you come across items in check-out rooms that have been left behind by the
guest.
Such items should be treated as valuable in the first instance, no matter what the actual dollar worth of
replacing such an item may be.
For example, a simple, partially used bottle of facial foundation, a camera, piece of clothing or an item of
jewellery. They are all the same in terms of being a ‘lost and found’ item.
All such items should be taken to the housekeeping department and recorded in the ‘Lost and Found’
log book.
It is the housekeeping department’s responsibility to keep accurate records of all items found in guest
rooms or public areas.
Information that needs to be recorded about the item may include:
1. Date found
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2. Room number – or other location as appropriate (corridor, guest
laundry etc.)
3. Exact location in room where item was found – ‘under the bed’,
‘in the bathroom’
4. Description of item – such as ‘Gent’s briefcase, brown, locked,
Avon brand’, ‘ladies Seiko watch, gold with leather strap’
5. Name of person who found the item
6. Date item was returned to the owner - after item has been claimed or
sent to the rightful owner.
7. Generally, lost property is kept for three months, however during that time the establishment
may attempt to contact the owner, especially if the item appears valuable or the guest is a
regular.
8. Where forwarding address or phone number is available, the guest is contacted and asked if
they would like the item returned.
9. The guest may be asked to forward postage before the item is sent.
A ‘With Compliments’ letter generally accompanies the return of the item and a copy of this letter
should be filed in the lost property correspondence file.
Some items that have not been claimed within a three-month period, after
all channels to contact the owner have been exhausted, will be given back to
the finder or handed to police depending on the value of the item and what
it is.
Lost property should never be taken off the premises without the correct
authorisation. You cannot assume that an item is yours simply because you
found it and the owner has departed.
Is it ‘lost’ or has it been left on purpose?
Where the lost property is clothing (especially lingerie) or other items of a delicate nature, the decision
about whether or not to contact the guest must be made with due consideration to all the possible
ramifications. Tact and diplomacy may dictate that no contact is made in order to avoid embarrassment
and other potential problems.
This highlights that not all items left in a guest room are ‘lost’. They may have
been deliberately left there.
Perishable food
Where perishable foods are found, two options are commonly available.
The first option is that you may have discretionary powers to deal with any
perishable food you find.
This may include minor quantities of things such as leftover takeaway foods, a
few biscuits in an open packet, or a couple of slices of cheese, a tomato and
some slices of bread left in the fridge.
If the items have been left by a departed guest, you may elect to throw out such
items.
Naturally the food would be left where it is if the guest was staying on.
The second option is that Standard Operating Procedures require all staff to take all found perishable
food to the Executive Housekeeper’s office, and to allow that person to make the decision.
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Liquor
Again, specific house practices will vary between establishments.
Commonly, any unopened bottle of liquor – spirits, wine, beer or whatever else is logged in the standard
way, and the liquor may then forwarded to the central liquor store for safe-keeping or retained in the
Housekeeping office for three months.
Opened bottles may be stored in the normal Lost and Found store, or can be forwarded to another
department.
It is useful to remember that what is actually inside a bottle of open beverage could be anything.
What is on the label may not be what is in the bottle so you should definitely guard against having a
drink from any bottle, alcoholic or non-alcoholic, that has been already opened.
Other items
There is really no end to the nature of items that can find their way into the Lost and Found area from
the very ordinary to the highly exotic!
In general terms, however, they can include:
 Inexpensive items – these must still be handed in as, despite being
inexpensive, they may still have significant sentimental value. These items
may include cheap pens, disposable items, handkerchiefs and socks
 Expensive items – objects of obvious worth such as cameras, lap top
computers, electric razors, jewellery, cash, or clothing
 Documents – this can cover a wide range of papers including business and
personal documents, as well as related items such as passports and credit
cards.
 Given this wide variety of items that could be found it is worth checking
house rules in regard to the following:
 Newspapers, magazines and books – while it is common practice for staff to
dispose of newspapers from check-out rooms, check your house rules to make sure.
 Also, find out about the house rules that relate to the disposal of magazines and books. Can they
be thrown out, or is there a requirement to hand them in?
 What criteria apply, if any, to making the decision about keeping or throwing out these items?
 Cash – check to see if your venue has a special rule about cash that is found.
 Regardless of what is considered is to be lost or found; it must be reported and recorded
according to organisational requirements.
6: PROVIDE ADDITIONAL HOUSEKEEPING SERVICES
6.1 Provide turn-down service
Introduction
Turn down service is service commonly found in four and five star
hotels. It is a service that prepares the room at the end of the day
for the comfort of the guest. It is designed to make the room
soothing and inviting for rest and relaxation.
Quite often a guest will be using the room during the day and by the afternoon it may be dirty or in need
of fresh amenities.
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‘Living’ in a hotel is different from home. Normally at home a person has a variety of rooms that they
use, with clutter being spread. This is not the case in a hotel room, where only one room is used, with all
activities contained within this one room.
This service is normally provided in the late afternoon or early evening and is performed at a time when
it is expected that the guest is not in the room.
TURN-DOWN STEPS
Preparation
The first step is to prepare the items that may be used as part of turn-down including:
 Linen – bed sheets, bath towels and pillows
 Amenities – shampoo, conditioner, hand lotion, moisturiser, sanitary items, toilet paper, tissues
 Give-aways – newspapers, chocolates, fruit, messages, flowers.
Enter the room
There will be a good chance the guest is in the room and may request:
 No service
 Supply of more and replacement items whilst not allowing you to
enter the room
 Turn-down service as normal.
 Regardless of their request it is your job to complete your tasks with
minimal disruption to the guest. Time is of the essence in this
situation, therefore clever thinking is required. The aim is to
minimise movement and unnecessary trips in and out of the room. Plan what you are going to
need.
Complete turn-down service
Normally turn-down includes:
1. Closing of curtains
2. Turning on lights to a soothing level
3. Playing appropriate music through the radio or television
4. Preparing the bed by removing or folding back display
quilts and blankets making access to bed easier
5. Placing items on the bed including fruit, messages, flowers
or chocolates
6. Replace dirty towels
7. Clean basic and bathroom surfaces
8. Clean used crockery and cutlery
9. Clean bins
10. Conduct a general clean and tidy.
Complete turn-down service
Once you have completed the turn-down service:
 Ask guest if they require any additional services – they may have laundry for submission
 Excuse yourself and leave the room at the earliest possible convenience.
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Do Not Disturb (DND) Rooms
A number of rooms may have their DND signs out. In this case you must not knock on the dooror enter
the room. You should:
 Record the time
 Go back after you have completed other rooms to check if the room is ready for service
 If the DND sign is still there, slip an appropriate card under the door, requesting the guest to call
housekeeping if they require turn-down at an appropriate time.
 If performed correctly the turn down process should take approximately 10 minutes per room.
6.2 Carry out rotational cleaning duties
Introduction
In the course of a normal day, room attendants will clean rooms as
required to get a room ready for a new arrival, or to clean an occupied
room. This activity is normally allocated a nominal time from between
20-40 minutes per room.
At times though, rotational cleaning duties will need to be performed
which will take longer to undertake.
These activities may be classified as:
 Preventative maintenance – activities to ensure equipment
furniture, fixtures and fittings are operation and effective
 Deep cleaning – activities to ensure equipment furniture, fixtures and fittings are clean.
 Regardless of the activity normally these are completed at times with lower occupancy,
requiring management to find tasks for full time staff that would otherwise be cleaning rooms.
Preventative maintenance
Some of these activities may include:
 Turning of mattresses – most people will sleep on one side of the mattress so mattresses will be
turned around and over to ensure even use and wear
 Replacement of items – curtains, shower curtains, bedding, pillows, replacement of old
appliances.
Deep cleaning
In the normal daily cleaning process whilst the guest room is cleaned, it may be ‘surface clean’ requiring
a ‘deep clean’ on a regular basis.
This may include a deep cleaning of all surfaces in a room including:
Room cleaning
1. Moving all furniture and ensuring it is clean underneath
2. Steam cleaning of floors, furniture and curtains
3. Extensive glass cleaning
4. Closer attention to the baseboards ensuring all dirt is wiped clean
5. Dust and clean blinds, valences or shutters
6. Vacuum or clean high shelves.
Bathroom Cleaning
1. Bleaching of all surfaces
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2. Extra attention to grouting of shower, wall and floor tiles.
Kitchen Cleaning
1. Pull stove and other appliances away from wall and clean
behind and under them
2. Detail cabinets and pantry
3. Detail kitchen drawers
4. Refrigerator should be cleaned under and behind. Vacuum
under the refrigerator grill and clean out hair, lint and dirt
in coils
5. Disinfect countertops, backsplash, front of cabinetry and under countertop appliances
6. Disinfect grooves in dishwasher and stove using a small brush
7. Defrost freezers
8. Disinfect kitchen tidy bins.
Deodorising and spraying
All rooms should be deodorised and sprayed for insects on a regular basis.
Normally this will require a professional service with specialised equipment and may involve strong
smelling or harmful chemicals. Adequate time is required for all odours to dissipate before the room can
be allocated to guests.
Detail room check
After any major cleaning activity it is important that the room is ready for use.
Therefore before leaving a guest room the following items should be checked,
visually inspected and confirmed:
1. All equipment is in correct operational order
2. All equipment is re-set – clock radio, video, telephone volume, etc. Always
check the alarm clock and re-set where necessary to ‘Off’; many guests
have had a good night’s sleep interrupted at 4:30AM by an alarm set by
the previous guest!
3. All crockery, cutlery and glassware is clean and replaced
4. All light bulbs are operational
5. Bed has been made properly and looks attractive
6. All picture frames are straight
7. All furniture is in the correct location
8. Bathroom is clean and all stock replenished
9. Refrigerator is clean, turned on and restocked as required (fresh water,
milk, ice cubes)
10. All guest supplies (give-aways) have been restocked
11. Bin liners have been replaced
12. All windows are closed
13. External doors to balconies are locked
14. All blinds and curtains are in place
15. Floor has been vacuumed
16. All lights are turned off.
Anything not conforming to the standards set by the house must be addressed. There is no point doing a
final check, finding a problem or area that isn’t right and then just ignoring it!
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6.3 Lend equipment to guests, as requested in accordance with house policies
Introduction
It is impossible for a hotel to provide all items the guest could possibly
need in all rooms. Firstly the cost would be substantial, the room would
become more cluttered and the opportunity for theft would greatly
increase.
Therefore most hotels will have items available for loan to guests, upon
request.
Types of loan items
Items that are commonly loaned to customers may include:
1. Special pillows
2. Extra bedding
3. Extra crockery and cutlery
4. Cots
5. Extra beds / rollway beds
6. Extra furniture
7. Ice buckets
8. Extra towels
9. Telephone chargers
10. Power boards
11. Internet cables
12. Video players and consoles
13. Children games& toys
14. DVD’s
15. Books
16. Iron and ironing board
17. Electrical adapters
18. Bath robe and weight scales
19. Hair dryer
20. Extra coat hangers
21. Portable fans or heaters
22. Picnic baskets
23. Clothes drying racks.
Each operation will have its own items that it loans to guests, whether on a free of charge basis or for a
fee.
Procedures for loaning items to guests
Depending on the item there are a number of steps that could be taken:
1. Record item – this is to ensure that once the guest has departed
the item is still in the room and accounted for and that the
appropriate action is taken to return it to its appropriate storage
location
2. Give the item in a timely manner; this is an important service
aspect. It is important to get the item as soon as possible to the
guest
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3. Get a guest signature if an item is expensive or if there is a charge involved
4. Record charges where appropriate; this is often completed at Front Office
5. Ensure items have been returned.
7: PREPARE FOR NEXT SHIFT
7.1 Complete required records and notifications
Introduction
The role of a room attendant is relatively free from paperwork and
reports; however there are some records that need to be updated by
room attendants as part of their job.
As room attendants work alone or in pairs for the majority of their
shift, written communication is vital to ensure information is recorded
and shared with other housekeeping team members.
Types of records and notifications
Some of the records and notifications written by room attendants on a
daily basis include:
1. Recording status of rooms
2. Lost property reports
3. Ordering of supplies
4. Handover reports – information required for the next shift, including turn-down rooms to
complete and incidents that occurred that day
5. Records of items that were loaned to guests
6. Maintenance requests
7. Time sheets.
8. Each workplace may have additional forms that need to be completed to suit the requirements
of their role.
7.2 Dispose of rubbish
Introduction
Housekeeping is all about cleanliness and tidiness and this should not stop at the end of the day.
The general cleanliness and hygiene of a hospitality business is vital to the health
of all stakeholders including staff, guests, owners and the community in general.
In reality, taking care when handling and disposing of rubbish is vital for a number
of reasons including:
1. A clean environment is aesthetically pleasing
2. Reduction of accidents caused by people tripping and falling over
3. Reduction of the chance of contamination
4. Reduction of unpleasant odours
5. Attraction of fewer insects and rodents
6. Reduced likelihood of contamination.
7. All staff have a responsibility to dispose of rubbish in a way that poses minimal hazards to all
stakeholders. Anyone who handles rubbish is at risk or injury and illness if it is not handled
correctly.
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Types of rubbish
There are two main types of rubbish in hospitality environments:
General Rubbish
This is similar to household rubbish and is the type of rubbish most found in
hospitality organisations and guest rooms. It includes:
1. Paper and boxes
2. Bottles
3. Plastic containers
4. Food and beverage related trash.
Hazardous Rubbish
This is rubbish that can be harmful and should be treated carefully. It includes:
1. Chemicals
2. Broken glass
3. Cleaning products
4. Disinfectants
5. Unknown bottles and liquids.
Handling rubbish
Staff should handle rubbish as little as possible before disposal. Special care must
be taken when handling hazardous rubbish. It may require special bags or boxes
(in the case of broken glass).
It is always advisable to:
1. Wear gloves when handling rubbish
2. Not overload rubbish bags or bins
3. Use safe manual handling techniques
4. Use a trolley to move rubbish where necessary
5. Dispose of rubbish in a timely manner
6. Move rubbish to disposal areas during quiet times or on quiet routes
7. Place rubbish in suitable disposal areas – this includes the separation of paper, glass and plastic
based products.
8. The efficient and effective removal of rubbish is key to maintaining a clean and tidy workplace.
7.3 Clean and store trolleys
Introduction
Your work as a room attendant does not finish when you complete servicing
the last room allocated to you.
Before you leave, there are several end-of-shift duties that will need to be
completed.
This Section looks at the need to clean your housekeeping trolley that was
used during the room servicing procedures
After every use you are responsible for cleaning and restocking the trolley
you have used during the cleaning activities.
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Cleaning the housekeeping trolley
Generally a wipe over assisted by a general purpose cleaner should suffice, with extra spot-cleaning as
required.
The intention is to remove any marks that the trolley may have and to maintain its
attractive appearance. You may need to replace used or dirty linen and rubbish
bags that are provided at end of the trolley to maintain eye appeal.
Attention should also be paid to:
1. Removing any soiled items
2. Removing any empty packages.
Restock the housekeeping trolley
The trolley is not unloaded at the end-of-shift. Items that are on the trolley when it
returns to the storeroom are left on it.
It is important that you restock your trolley so that it is ready for the next shift.
Each organisation will have different items that need to be placed on the trolley.
7.4 Replenish stock items as necessary
Introduction
One of the last tasks you will be required to do at the end of a shift is to check the
supplies that exist in the housekeeping store.
You may be required to order extra supplies, or replenish them.
Reordering stock and supplies
Your experience coupled with any management guidelines relating to the levels of
stock to be kept in a housekeeping storeroom will assist in determining whether
or not stock or supplies need to be ordered.
The aim of maintaining stock and supplies in a housekeeping store is that you
never run out of anything but you don’t over-stock
Housekeeping trolleys can be stocked at the beginning or end of each shift, but it
is preferable that they are fully re-stocked at the end of the day’s work, so the
trolley is prepared for the next shift, and so that missing items are able to be
bought in before the next shift.
When supplies run low during a shift, further supplies may be accessed from the
housekeeping store room. There is generally one on each floor which must be
kept locked to prevent unauthorised access.
When supplies in the floor housekeeping store room run low, further supplies
can be brought up from the housekeeping department where there is usually some form of central store
purely for housekeeping supplies.
When requesting supplies you may be required to complete a
requisition form.
The requisition form is an internal stock ordering form that you fill in
and give to the Head Housekeeper (or other nominated person).
It will identify:
 Person requesting the items
 Type of items needed
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Quantity
Date.
The majority of housekeeping departments will have a standard
order/requisition form.
Requisition forms that are completed and forwarded to the Head
Housekeeper at the end of shift today, should result in the supplies that have
been ordered or ‘requisitioned’
uisitioned’ being supplied to the appropriate floor
housekeeping store/linen room later that day or early the next day before
the next shift starts work.



What should be checked to replenish or reorder?
In short, ‘everything’.
The housekeeping store often contains a multitude of items over and above the room and guest
supplies that have been mentioned elsewhere in these notes.
It is not uncommon to find one or a few of the following in most housekeeping stores:
1. Light globes
2. Batteries for remote controls
3. Ash trays
4. Glasses
5. An assortment of cutlery and crockery – plus an assortment of cooking
items where rooms have a kitchenette
6. Safety pins and drawing pins
7. Spare electric blankets, irons, ironing board covers, hair dryers, electric
jugs etc
8. Ice cube trays.
Where
here you have run out of any of the above or you suspect stocks are below
what can reasonably be needed, you should requisition or reorder them.
7.5 Clean housekeeping equipment prior to storage
Introduction
Now that the storage areas are maintained and restocked it is important to ensure that all housekeeping
equipment is clean and ready for the next shift.
Following is a brief description of how different equipment can be cleaned and stored.
Equipment to be cleaned
Mops
Procedures for cleaning of the three
hree main types of mops are as follows:
1. Dusting mops – after use, shake thoroughly in appropriate
location (outside) then wash in hot soapy water, and hang out
to air dry
2. Polishing mops – on a regular basis, remove fluff and rinse mop
in turpentine, which will remove the polish – after the mop has
been squeeze-dried, re-coat
coat with polish
3. Washing mops – on a regular basis mops should be washed in
hot soapy water, rinsed thoroughly, squeeze-dried,
squeeze
and then
hung up to air dry.
200
Dusters
Cleaning of dusters involves:
1. Shaking clean regularly in an appropriate outside location
2. Washing in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions – the laundry will be responsible
for this: you will be required to leave all used dusters and cleaning cloths in a nominated
location for the laundry porter to pick up.
Brooms and brushes
Cleaning of brooms and brushes may vary with special items but the general
approach is:
1. Shake clean in an outside location
2. Wash with designated detergent – some properties will also require
sanitising
3. Hang to air dry.
Cloths and sponges
Clothes may be given to the laundry for cleaning, or you may have to do your
own: the increasing use of disposable cloths has reduced the need to clean these.
Where you have to clean your own:
1. Wash with designated detergent – some properties will also require sanitising
2. Air dry.
Buckets
A dedicated bucket wash area complete with purpose-built sink and grate (for
resting the bucket on) may be available – buckets may also be filled at this location.
Cleaning involves:
1. Tipping out the dirty water into the sink or gully trap identified for this
purpose – buckets should not be emptied in the guest room
2. Removing or rinsing out any dirt and material
3. Washing with designated detergent – some properties will also require
sanitising
4. Checking rollers and removing debris as required – clean rollers with cloth
5. Turning upside down and leaving to air dry.
Vacuum cleaners
 All vacuum cleaners must be cleaned out at the end of the shift and the bag
replaced if required.
 The machine and its attachments must be wiped clean using a damp cloth.
 The power cord should be wrapped correctly and safely.
 All cleaning of vacuum cleaners must be done in accordance with
manufacturer’s instructions.
Where does this happen?
This cleaning is usually done in the room where the trolleys are kept at the end of shift. The floor
housekeeping store, or there may be a need to take the trolley to some remote dedicated cleaning area.
Equipment is cleaned after use so as to:
1. Maintain a high level of appearance –equipment is seen by many guests who may reach a
decision about our cleaning procedures based on the trolleys they see in the corridors
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2. Maximise their operational effectiveness
3. Leave the items ready for use.
Location for storing equipment
In general:
 Large items – vacuum cleaners, brooms, buckets – go on the floor
 Smaller items go on shelves – shelves often have labels to show what goes where.
Everything has its nominated position in the storeroom to:
 Make it easy to see what is left and how much is left
 Allow all room attendants to quickly obtain what they want – remember that others will also be
using this store
 Facilitate stocktaking activities.
Checks to make when storing equipment
When storing equipment, check the following:
1. All minor or major faults and repair needs have been identified and
acted upon
2. All equipment has been cleaned – and where appropriate, dried
3. Electrical cords are rolled up and positioned safely and securely
4. Every piece of equipment and every cleaning item is stored safely (that
is, so as not to pose a risk to staff) and in the appropriate location
5. The door to the storeroom is locked when you leave.
Finally
Go to the Head Housekeeper’s office and:
 Advise that you have finished and about to go – this is a good practice because it allows you to
be informed about other needs. It is also polite and expected staff behaviour. Don’t just go
home without telling anyone you are going
 Notify the office of any problems you have identified or any
suspicions etc you have. This includes submitting any requisitions,
requests, reports, forms etc.
 Hand back and sign in your room keys or cards
 Complete your time sheet.
 Once you have completed this task you have successfully completed
your shift.
 As this manual demonstrates, the role of a room attendant is a hard
job requiring a special person with a wide range of knowledge, skills and attributes.
 The room attendant is truly the spine of the hospitality industry.
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FUNDAMENTAL ENGLISH
GRAMMAR
1. PRESENT CONTINUOUS (Progressive)
Look at these examples:
 It isn’t raining now. We can go outside.
 Are you doing anything tonight?
 What are you cooking?
 What classes are you taking this semester?
 I am meeting the crew manager tomorrow morning.
 We are repairing the ship in the dry-dock yard these days.
We use the Present Continuous tense for:
 Actions happening at the present moment
 Planned future events (usually in the near future, e.g. this evening, next week, etc)
 Actions or events happening around the present moment
Structure
to be (am / is / are) + verb -ing
Positive Form
I am (I’m)
You are (You’re)
He, She, It is (He’s, She’s, It’s)
We, You, They are (We’re, You’re, They’re)
Eating lunch
Now.
coming
This evening.
Negative Form
I am not (I’m not)
You are not (You aren’t)
He, She, It is not (He, She, It isn’t)
We, You, They are not (We, You, They aren’t)
Question Form
Am
Are
Is
I
You / we / they
He / she / it
Talking too fast?
Listening to me?
Note: The spelling of the –ing form of the verbs:
Work
Come
Stop
Die
Working
Coming
Stopping
dying
The verbs that are not used in the continuous forms:
Some verbs express an action, something a person
does:
 He is cooking dinner at the moment:
The present continuous is used only with action verbs:
I am working right now.
NOTI am believing you
Some verbs express a “state” and cannot be used in the
continuous forms:
 I want to travel around the world
Common verbs not used in the continuous forms:
Believe, understand, think (expressing opinion), want,
hope, smell, taste, feel, sound, look, seem, appear, etc
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2. PRESENT SIMPLE
nd
The 2 Mate usually stands a navigational watch
The Captain does not stand a watch
Does the Chief Engineer usually work during the day?
Does the Bosun supervise all A/Bs? Yes, he does.
The quartermaster keeps a lookout for other vessels and steers the ship in and out of port
The Captain pays the crew
I don’t usually go out on Friday night
I live in Southampton
The Chief Steward speaks German and Spanish
Does he smoke many cigarettes every day? Yes, he does. / No, he doesn’t
Do you agree with the new anti-smoking regulations?
Do you like your studies? Yes, I do
Do you worry about the future? No, I don’t
We use the Simple Present
1) When we speak of habits and daily routines (what we do sometimes, often, always, every day,
usually, never, etc.) or
2) When we speak about something permanent (where we live; what languages we speak; what
we like, dislike, love, hate, know, understand etc.)
Structure:
I
You
He / She / It
I
You
He / She / It
live
live
lives
watch
watch
watches
in Lombok
a lot of TV
We
You
They
We
You
They
live
live
live
watch
watch
watch
in Lombok
a lot of TV
Note: the ending –s or –es in the 3rd person singular, e.g. washes, manages; kisses.
-es after –s / -ch / -sh : pass → passes, watch → watches, finish → finishes
Also : do → does, go → goes, study → studies, carry → carries
Questions and Negative Sentences
Where do you work? I work in an office
When do you start? I start work at nine
When do you finish? I finish at four
Do you like your work? No, I don’t
Jim works in an office. He starts work at nine and he finishes at four
He doesn’t like his work
Where
I
You
He / She / It
We
You
They
do / does
Do / Does
You / he
You, she, it , they
Work?
work
in an office?
Do not (don’t)
Does not (doesn’t
live
In Indonesia
Do not (don’t)
NOTE: no –es ending in questions
no –es ending in negative sentences
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3. PRESENT SIMPLE Vs. PRESENT CONTINUOUS
Look at the time graphs and the examples to compare the use of Present Simple and Present
Continuous.
Present Continuous
USE 1: Now (this second, at this very moment)
Examples: What are you doing? Are you sleeping? Why aren’t you doing your homework?
USE 2: Longer actions in Progress Now
Examples: (You say, while having coffee with a friend) “Are you working on any special projects at
work?” “Yes, we are preparing the new year’s financial proposal.”
USE 3: Near Future
Examples: I am meeting some friends after work. Is he visiting his parents next weekend?
Simple Present
USE 1: Repeated Actions
Examples: Does he play tennis? She always forgets her keys
USE 2: Facts or Generalization
Examples: Cats like milk. Birds do not like milk.
Note: Other uses of these tenses:
We use the Present Continuous to express
Repetition and Irritation with “always”
 I don’t like him because he is always complaining.
We use the Simple Present for
Scheduled Events in the Near Future
 The ship does not arrive at 11 am. It arrives at 11
pm
Note: Where we place adverbs such as: always, only, never, ever, still, just, etc.




You are still watching TV
Are you still watching TV?
You only speak English.
Do you only speak English?
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4. COMPARATIVE AND SUPERLATIVE ADJECTIVES
Look at these examples:
The Atlantic Pioneer is longer than the British Emerald
The British Emerald is older than the Oberon
The DFDE engine is more effective



“longer”, “older” and “more effective” are comparative forms
The comparative form is formed with –er or more…
After comparatives you can use than
Spelling
In general, we use “-er” for short adjectives and “more…” for longer ones.
e.g long → longer
difficult → more difficult
 Wide → wider [ if the adjec ves ends in –e, simply add –r ]
 Heavy → heavier [ if the adjectives ends in –y, change the –y to –I and add –er ]
 Big → bigger [ if the adjec ves ends in a consonant + vowel + consonant before –er, the consonant at the end
is “doubled” ]
These adjectives have irregular comparative forms:
 Good → be er e.g. The new engine has a better performance record than the old one
 Bad → worse e.g. Is your health be er? No, I am afraid it’s worse
 Far → further (or farther) e.g. It’s a long drive from here to the port, further than I thought.
Look at these examples:
The Atlantic Pioneer is the longest ship of the three
The British Emerald is one of the largest LNG Carriers in the world
The shipyard is one of the most reliable of its kind



“longest”, “largest” and “most reliable” are superlative forms
The superlative form is formed with –est or most…
We normally use the before a superlative
Spelling
In general, we use “-est” for short adjectives and “most…” for longer ones
e.g. long → longest
difficult → most difficult
 Wide → widest [if the adjec ves ends in –e, simply add –st]
 Heavy → heaviest [if the adjec ves ends in –y, change the –y to –I and add –est
 Big → biggest [if the adjec ves ends in consonant + vowel + consonant before –est, the consonant at the
end is “doubled”]
These adjectives have irregular superlative forms:
Good → best e.g. Tom is the best Chief Engineer I’ve ever worked with
Bad → worst e.g. What was the worst day of your life?
Far → furthest e.g. What is the furthest point humans have travelled in space?
5. “WILL” / “be going to” IN WEATHER FORECASTS
Look at the following phrases, taken form weather forecasts:
Melbourne is going to be dry
Showers will break out later in the evening
We use both “going to” and “will” for weather forecast.
 “going to” is used for pre-determined prediction about the weather:
e.g. The weather forecast says it is going to rain tomorrow
Generally, we can use both “will” and “going to” to predict the future
206
“going to” is used to predict the future when we have already got some evidence that something is
certain or likely to happen. When we say “something is going to happen” we know (or think) this
because of the situation now
e.g. It’s going to rain later, Look at those black clouds in the sky!
(I can see the clouds building up now, it is sure to happen)
 “will” tends to be used when this evidence is not present, or at least is not as concrete.
e.g. I think it will rain later
(It often does at this time of year)

6. PAST SIMPLE (REGULAR AND IRREGULAR VERBS)
The MV Kedok sailed from Perth to Hong Kong last year.
We stayed in port for several days.
To report a past event we use the past simple. The past simple often ends in -ed
He worked at Malaga port from 1990 to 2013
Yesterday it rained all morning. It stopped in the evening.
I call my girlfriend on the phone every day. Last night I called her at midnight.
These verbs are regular verbs:
Work – worked, rain – rained, stop – stopped, call – called
Spelling:
 Like + d = liked [ if the verb ends in –e, add –d ]
 Stop + p + ed = stopped [ if the verb ends with a consonant + vowel + consonant, double the last
consonant and add –ed ]
 Carry + ed = carried [ if the verb ends with a consonant + y, change the –y to –I and add –ed ]
Use
With the Simple Past we describe an action that occurred and was completed in the past (for instance, a
year / a month / a week ago, yesterday, last month / week, in 2017, etc)
Pronunciation
There are three ways to pronounce the final –ed of regular verbs in the simple past tense.
This pronunciation is determined by the final sound of the verb in the infinitive. It is pronounced:
/id/
When the verb ends in a sound
/t/ or /d/:
Examples:
Want → wanted
Decide → decided
/t/
When the verb ends in an unvoiced
consonant sound such as /k/, /s/,
/ts/, /f/, /p/:
Examples:
Like → liked
Wash → washed
Miss →missed
Laugh → laughed
Watch → watched
Stop → stopped
/d/
When the verb ends in any other
sound (voiced consonants like /b/,
/g/, /v/, /m/, /n/, /r/ and vowel
sounds)
Examples:
Grab → grabbed
Hug → hugged
Love → loved
Open → opened
Repair → repaired
Stay → stayed
207
Some verbs are irregular. The pas simple does not end in -ed
The ship left the port on 5 April and was at sea for three days
These verbs are irregular: leave – left, be – was
Note: The verb “to be” has two past forms:
I / he / she / it was
We / you / they were
Here are some important irregular verbs:
Begin → began
Come → came
Do → did
Drink → drank
Eat → ate
Fall → fell
Find → found
Get → got
Give → gave
Go → went
Have → had
Hear → heard
Leave → le
Lose → lost
Make → made
Meet → met
Pay → paid
Say → said
See → saw
Sell → sold
Take → took
Understand → understood
7. PAST SIMPLE (QUESTIONS AND NEGATIVES)
Did you notify the authorities? What did they do to contain the spill?
The leak did not cause dangerous pollution.
We use did in past simple negatives and questions:
Infinitive
watch
clean
play
do
go
have
begin
Positive
I
we
you
they
he
she
it
watched
cleaned
played
did
went
had
began
Negative
I
we
you
they
he
she
it
I
he
she
it
we
you
they
was
was
was
was
were
were
were
I
he
she
it
we
you
they
Question
watch
clean
play
do
go
have
begin
did not
(didn’t)
did
I
we
you
they
he
she
it
watch?
clean?
play?
do?
go?
have?
begin?
BUT:
be
was not
(wasn’t)
was
were not
(weren’t)
where
Note: The most usual mistakes: I watched but I didn’t watch
He went but Did he go?
I?
he?
she?
it?
we?
you?
they?
(not I didn’t watched)
(not Did he went?)
Yes / No questions – Wh – questions
Note: the word order in questions with “did” and the position of the question word in wh- questions:
What
How
Where
did
did
did
did
the captain
you
the accident
the messmates
give
do
happen?
go
you the master key?
yesterday evening?
after lunch?
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Short answers
Yes, I did. [Yes, I / we / you / they / he / she / it did]
No, I didn’t. [No, I / we / you / they / he / she / it didn’t]
8. PRESENT PERFECT (Regular and Irregular Verbs)
We have secured all moorings.
Have you sounded the tanks? Yes, we have just finished sounding the tanks.
Have you connected the bunker hoses?
The Master hasn’tsigned the Bunker Delivery Note (BND) yet.
As you can see in the example sentences above, when talking about work operations, we use the
Present Perfect Simple tense to:
 describerecent actions
 check completion of operation procedures
 give information about activities at different stages of completion
In general, with the Present Perfect we talk about time
From the past until now
[for instances, since 2017 (till now), for 11 years (till now), ever (in
your life), yet (until now), etc.]
Past
Present
Future
Form of the Present Perfect tense: have / has + past participle
I / you / we / they
He / she / it
Positive
I have finished
He has finished
Negative
I have not finished
He has not finished
Question
Have you finished?
Has he finished?
These verbs are regular: secure – secured, sound – sounded, finish – finished, connect – connected, sign
- signed
Spelling
 store + d = stored [if the verb ends in –e, add –d]
 drop + p + ed = dropped [if the verbs ends with a consonant + vowel + consonant, double the final
consonant and add –ed]
 carry + ed = carried [if the verb ends with a consonant +y, change the –y to –I and add –ed]
Pronuncation
There are three ways to pronounce the final –ed of the past participle, the same as in the simple past
tense. Look again at the pronunciation tables in the Past Simple section above.
Some verbs are irregular. The past participle does not end in –ed.
We have put the fenders in position
Has the bunker barge left the vessel?
I have sent bunker samples for analysis.
These verbs are irregular: put – put, leave – left, send – sent
Note: The verb “to be” has the following present perfect form:
I / we / you / they have been
he / she / it has been
209
Look at some irregular verbs useful for describing work operations: (the simple past form is also given)
begin – began – begun
come – came – come
do – did – done
fall – fell – fallen
find – found – found
get – got - got
give – gave – given
go – went – gone
have – had – had
hear – heard – heard
hold – held – held
leave – left - left
lose – lost – lost
make – made – made
say – said – said
see – saw – seen
take – took – taken
understand – understood - understood
Here are some irregular verbs in groups.
cost – cost – cost
cut – cut –cut
put – put – put
break – broke – broken
speak – spoke – spoken
wake – woke – woken
buy – bought – bought
bring – brought – brought
think – thought – thought
know – knew – known
throw – threw – thrown
blow – blew - blown
spend – spent – spent
send – sent – sent
bend – bent – bent
sleep – slept – slept
sweep – swept – swept
keep – kept - kept
9. TALKING ABOUT THE FUTURE: Future plans / events
Compare:
“When are you going to take the Marlin English Test?
“ I am going to take the test at 10.00 tomorrow.”
“I don’t know. Maybe I will be on holidays or maybe
I will be at sea.”
“Where will you be in two months?
We can use both “be going to” and “will” to discuss future events / actions;
 we can use be going to to describe future events that we have planned or arranged.
 We can use will to describe future events that are uncertain.
The Simple Future (will + infinitive) is used for offers, predictions, threats, requests, etc.:


I’ll help you fill in the application.
Put your hands up or I’ll shoot.


Tomorrow, it will be cold and rainy
Will you take the garbage out, please?
‘be going to’ is used:
1. For future plans or intentions
 He is going to join the cruise shipboard next month
2. For predictions based on evidence
 Look! That vessel is listing heavily. It is going to capsize
Compare:
“The hand soap dispenser in Toilet needs refilling.”
“Does it? I’ll refill it later”
[on the spot decision]
“The hand soap dispenser in Toilet needs refilling.”
“I know. I am going to refill it later.”
[something already decided / planned]
Generally, when talking about the future, we tend to use “be going to” when we know something
because of the situation now:
 “I feel terrible. I think I’m going to be sick.”
In other situations it’s safer to use “will”:
 “I think she will like the present we bought for her”
Note: The Simple Present and the Present Continuous can also be used to talk about the future.
 Hurry up! The movie starts in a few minutes.
 We’re going camping this weekend.
210
Form:
“will” is used before verbs in the infinitive form:
I / you / he / she / we / they
will
go ashore
Sometimes we use the short form: I will → I’ll
 I’ll see you tomorrow. (instead of “ I will see you”)
In negative sentences, will not → won’t
 He won’t have time to go ashore tomorrow. (instead of “He will not have time”)
 I won’t see you again for six months!
Yes / No questions:
Will
you / he / she / they…
What
Will
come home early tonight?
Wh – questions:
you / he / she / they…
buy?
“be going to” is used before verbs in the infinitive form:
I / you / he / she / we / they
Am / is / are going to
Go to the bank tomorrow
Yes / No questions:
Are / is / am
you / he / she / we / they / i
going to
participate in the meeting tomorrow?
Wh – questions:
When
are / is / am
you / he / she / they / I…
going to
come back?
Note: Phrases used to refer to future points in time:
e.g. Where will you be in two months?
To talk about a time in the future, we can say:
Two days / weeks / months / years from now or
In two days / weeks / months / years / a month’s time
Other future time expressions (generally used at the end of the sentence or question).
Tomorrow, next week/month/year, the day after tomorrow
10. PAST CONTINUOUS
Was / were + verb-ing is the Past Continuous tense.
I was painting outside the cruise ship
This tense is used to talk about an activity that was in progress at a specific time in the past. The
emphasis is on the duration of the activity in the past.
211
What were you doing between 14:00 and 17:00 yesterday?. I was sleeping
I / he / she / it
You / we / they
Question form:
Were
Negative form:
I
was
were
painting
you
sleeping?
wasn’t
sleeping
What was he doing when the collision happened?
He was talking on the VHF, when it happened.
The Past Continuous tense is often used with the Simple Past in one sentence to show that one action
was in progress when another action occurred and interrupted it. Notice how one action is already in
progress when the other action happens:
PAST
He was talking on the VHF
X
NOW
When the collision happened
So, we use the Past Continuous tense:
 To describe repeated or continuous actions in the past
 To describe ongoing activities in the past which were interrupted by another event.
11. WHAT IS THE TIME?
My ETA is 08.00 (‘zero eight hundred hours”)
Loading starts at 09.10 (“zero nine ten”)
Loading finishes at 14.15 (“fourteen fifteen”)
Embarkation starts at 09.15 (“zero nine fifteen”)
Disembarkation starts at 06.30 (“zero six thirty”)
Embarkation finishes at 14.00 (“fourteen zero zero”}
Disembarkation finishes at 08.00 (“zero eight zero zero”)
Vessel’s ETD is 15.50 (“fifteen fifty”)



At sea we speak using the 24 hour UTC (Universal Time Coordinated) notation
The digital 24-hour clock system helps us avoid confusion with a.m. (ante meridiem = before noon)
and p.m. (post meridiem = after noon)
Instead of saying 3 p.m. we write 1500 and say fifteen hundred hours or one five zero zero hours.
Instead of saying 3 a.m. we write 0300 and say zero three hundred hours or zero three zero zero
hours.
Complete the times.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
08.30 p.m
8.00 a.m
7.05 p.m
11.20 a.m
2.00 p.m
You write
20.30
You say
Twenty thirty
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6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
4.00 p.m
12.15 p.m
11.40 p.m
1.55 p.m
1.00 a.m
CRUISE SHIP GLOSSARY
ABANDON SHIP
Meninggalkan kapal setelah ada perintah dari captain,
karena suatu keadaan darurat seperti terbakar ataupun
tenggelam
Aboard
Affected area
Aft
Alarm signal
All aboard
ada di dalam kapal.
Daerah yg terbakar atau rusak
bagian belakang/ arah belakang
Tanda atau perintah dalam keadaan darurat
tanda waktu semua penumpang dan awak kapal (crew
)harus berada didalam kapal
Alleyway
Allotment
Jalan kecil, lorong dikapal, koridor
Sebagian,atau semua gaji crew kapal yang dikirm ke
keluarga atau teman pada saat gajian
Alongside
Amidships
Anchor
Ashore
Assembly station
Disisi kapal lain,atau dermaga
tengah tengah kapal
Jangkar Kapal
Berada di daratan
Tempat berkumpul di deck ditempat lifeboat(sekoci)
ataupun di darat
Assist as directed
Astern
Beam
Berth
Bingo
Blast
Boat (LIFEBOAT)
Boatdrill
Menunggu ,mengikuti perintah yg diberikan
berada di bagianbelakang kapal.
lebar kapal
tempat berlabuh ,merapat
Permainan bingo,di bawah entertainment department
suara bunyi bel kapal(ship horn)
sekoci penolong
latihan untuk mempraktekkan pennyelamatan dengan
sekoci
Boatdrill are mandatory
Boatstation
Boatswain /bosun
Bow
Bridge
wajib untuk mengikuti latihan penyelamatan.
tempat berkumpul, dimana sekoci berada
bagian dari deck department, kepala kelasi
arah bagian depan kapal
Tempat kemudi kapal (tempat captain kapal
bertugas)&navigasi
Buffer Zone
sekelilling area yg dijaga atau disengaja dijadikan basah
untuk menghindari penyebaran api
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Bulkhead
dinding pemisah kapal, yg digunakan untuk memisahkan
beberapa tempat seperti kamar , dsbnya
Buoy
Cabin
pelampung
kamar di kapalClear by the local authority : telah selesai
diperiksa oleh local authority (petugas yg berwenang
didarat)
Cabin inspection
pemeriksaan kamar crew (kebersihan, kerusakan,
dsbnya)
Cabin steward
Capsize
Captain
seseorang yang bertugas membersihkan kamar .
terbalik
Master /commander of the ship .Pemimpin,nahkoda
tertinggi.
Cargo
Chart
Chief engineer
Chief housekeeper
Chief officer
Comment card
Barang / kapal barang
petunjuk dan peta menuju kapal
kepala bagian mesin( kapal)
kepala bagian tata graha
orang no 2 dibawah captain.
formulir yg diisi tamu, tentang complaint, rating, atau
usul-usul .
Compass
Corridor
Course
Crew
Crew area
Crew cabin
Crew mess
Crew party
Crew shopping
Alat untuk menunjukan arah/ jalannya kapal
gang kecil
Jalan ya ng akan dilalui kapal menuju tujuan (navigasi)
awak kapal
areal tempat awak kapal(crew)
kamar awak kapal
tempat makan awak kapal (crew)
saatnya awak kapal bersenang –senang
Waktu crew boleh berbelanja ditoko yg sehari –harinya
untuk tamu kapal
Crew show
Crew window
Pertunjukan yg dilakukan oleh crew
jam atau waktu boleh keluar-masuk kapal, atau diatur
jamnya sampai kapal “ clear”atau selesai diperiksa oleh
petugas di US port yg diatur oleh local authority
Crow’s nest
tempat ketinggian untuk observasi melihat jalannya
kapal.
Cruise director
Seseorang yg bertugas merencanakan, mengatur,
menjalankan program buat tamu, juga memimpin
entertainment department
Daily program
Davit
Debark/disembarkation
Deck
daftar /catatan kegiatan sehari hari
alat yang dipakai menurunkan atau menaikan
keluar meninggalkan kapal/akhir perjalanan
lantai kapal (geladak)
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Dehydration
Departure
Dining room manager
Distress signal
Dock
Dockyard
Dress code
Dry dock
menjadi kering/kekeringan
waktu kapal meninggalkan dermaga
maitre’d hotel,kepala restaurant
tanda keadaan bahaya
tempat kapal merapat,berlabuh
galangan kapal
aturan/petunjuk berpakaian
Saat kapal masuk galangan kapal untuk perbaikan
dimana tanpa air /kering
E.P.I.R.B for lifeboat(sekoci)
Emergency Position-indicating Radio Beacon(alat untuk
mengirim tanda bahaya/darurat yang bisa diterima oleh
satelit,kapal,pesawat terbang
Embark/Embarkation
Emergency escape
Emergency exit
Engine control room
masuk kapal /memulai perjalanan
jalan/rute penyelamatan
Pintu keluar darurat
tempat kontrol ,pusat operational dari engineering
department
Entertainment department
bertanggung jawab atas segala jenis
pertunjukan,musik,taria-tarian dan hiburan
Excursion
F.S.D
Fathom
Fire door
tour yang dilakukan setelah kapal merapat.
Singkatan dari Fire Screen Door
kedalaman air (6 feet)
pintu khusus yang mampu menghalangi penyebaran asap
dan api
Fire drill
Latihan secara detail, tentang pencegahan,pemandaman
api
Fire extinguisher
Fire squads
Alat untuk memadamkan api
Awak kapal yang khusus dilatih dan ditugaskan untuk
pemadaman api dikapal.
First time cruiser
Flag state
tamu yang baru pertama kali naik kapal pesiar(cruising)
tempat dimana kapal terdaftar dan megikuti peraturan
hukumnya
Fleet
Fore
Forward(FWD)
Galley
Galley tour/kitchen tour
kapal,armada
bagian depan kapal.
bagian depan kapal
dapur
kegiatan untuk melihat keadaan dapur,tata letak dapur
dsbnya
Gangway
Garbage treatment room
tempat keluar –masuk kapal
tempat pembuangan, penyimpanan, pemisahan,
penghancuran sampah
Gratuities
uang tips
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Guest amenities
Guest chef
fasilitas-fasilitas tamu
tamu/tukang masak yang diundang ke kapal untuk
mendemontrasikan ketrampilan memasak.
Guest lecturer
seseorang yang diundang kekapal untuk mengajarkan
,memberikan ceramah tentang hal –hal tertentu.
Head , the
Heading
kamar mandi
arah kemana kapal akan menujuHomeport : Tempat
tetap dimana kapal selalu memulai dan mengakhiri
perjalanan
High seas
jauh ditengah laut, lautan diluar territorial suatu Negara
Hotel Manager/Hotel director
Hull
I.L.O
I.M.O
seseorang yang memimpin hotel department
Lambung kapal
International Labor Organization( Organisasi buruh)
International Maritime Organization (organisasi
maritime)
Inaugural voyage
Infirmary
Inflammable material
Inside cabin
Itinerary
Jacob’s ladder
Job description
Join the vessel
Keel
Keep clear
Knot
saat pertama kali kapal berlayar,saat diresmikan.
bagian medis /rumah sakit dikapal
bahan yg mudah terbakar
kamar yg tidak ada jendela
rute ,tujuan perjalanan kapal
tangga dari tali.
tugas /pekerjaan yang ditentukan
pada saat baru joint /naik kapal
bagian dasar kapal
menjauh dari kapal lain .Bebas dari benda/barang
kecepatan kapal 1 knot adalah 1.15 miles per jam , 1,852
kilometres
Law of the sea
perjanjian dan peraturan internasional tentang dunia
kelautan
Life buoy
Life raft
Lifejacket
Liferaft
Log
pelampung penyelamat
rakit dari karet
baju pelampung
Rakit Penolong
catatan harian dari kecepatan kapal dan
perkembangannya.
Lowering team
awak kapal yang ditugaskan menurunkan lifeboat
(sekoci) ataupun raft (rakit) keair didalam keadaan
darurat
M .S
M.S.C
M.T.S
Motor ship
Maritime Safety committee
Motor turbine ship
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M.V.
Maiden voyage
Main sitting
Motor vessel
saat pertama kali kapal berlayar secara resmi.
waktu paling awal dari jam makan diningroom , biasanya
jam 5.45 pm
Maitre’d
Man over board
restaurant manager
seseorang yang jatuh kelaut /ditengah laut yang
memerlukan pertolongan
Manifest
Maritime Law
daftar tamu ataupun awak kapal.
peraturan Internasional yang mengatur segala kegiatan
dilaut.
Marpol
Marine pollution,peraturan internasional tentang polusi
laut yg disebabkan oleh minyak,bahan kimia,sampah
ataupun ,kotoran.
Marsec
Maritime security (keamanan kelautan) Mayday :
panggilan dengan radio,untuk meminta bantuan dalam
keadaan darurat.
Master
Medical department
Messroom
Mooring
Name of the vessel
Name tag
Nautical
Nautical mile
Navigation
Number of port
O.S
Officer mess
Officer on watch
On board
On the pier
Open sitting
captain kapal.
bagian medis/ kesehatan
tempat makan awak kapal/crew
tempat jangkar diturunkan.
nama kapal
nama /tanda pengenal crew
istilah tentang kapal dan kelautan
kira kira 6076 feet
navigasi
Jumlah tempat yang akan dikunjungi
ordinary seaman (pelaut)
tempat makan para officer
officer/perwira yg sedang tugas/jaga
didalam kapal
di dermaga
Tamu yang makan di restaurant dan duduk ditempat
yang diinginkan.
Outside cabin
kamar yang mempunyai jendela dan mempunyai
pemandangan laut.
P.V.S.A
Passageway
Passenger
Passenger areas
Passanger vessel service act
jalan kecil/koridor diantara kamar-kamar.
tamu di kapal
tempat yg diperuntukkan untuk akomodasi, tempat
bersenang –senang,dan fasilitas untuk para tamu.
PAX
Penthouse
Singkatan dari Passenger
Kamar terbaik,terlengkap.termahal
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Pier
Pilot
dermaga tempat kapal merapat
petugas yg memberikan petunjuk ketika kapal menuju
suatu tempat/pelabuhan
Port
Port agent
Kiri
petugas atau kantor penghubung dengan pemerintahan
daerah setempat
Porthole
Portside
Portside
Propeller
Provision
Purser
Jendela bundar kecil
bagian sebelah kiri /sisi kiri
bagian kiri kapa
Baling- baling
Makanan,,air, dan segala kebutuhan yang dibutuhkan
bertugas untuk pengurusan
document,pembayaran,keuangan.
Quartermaster
bagian dari navigation team dibawah chief officer dan
captain
Quay
Radio officer
Registry
Religious service
Report to the bridge
dermaga
officer yg bertugas mengurus tehnologi /IT
tempat dimana kapal terregister(terdaftar)
program keagamaan
panggilan untuk menghadap,atau melaporkan dan
memberikan informasi ke bridge
Rescue team
Restricted area
S.O.L.A.S
tim penyelamat dalam keadaan darurat
tempat terbatas dan terlarang.
Safety of life at seas .Organisasi international dibawah
United Nation tentang maritime safety(keamanan dan
keselamatan kelautan)
S.O.S
S.T.C.W
Safety shoes
Safety sign
Sanitation
Sea sick
Seafarer
Seaman
Shipyard
Sistership
tanda panggilan dalam keadaan darurat
Standard of Training Certification and Watchkeeping.
sepatu yg dirancang khusus untuk dipakai bekerja
tanda –tanda untuk keamanan dan keselamatan
kebersihan,kesehatan
mabuk laut
pelaut
Pelaut
galangan kapal
kapal yg sebagian atau seluruhnya mempunyai
,ukuran,jenis,model, dsnya yang sama atau hampir sama.
Stabilizer
Starboard (STBD)
Starboardside
Tanker
TBA
alat pengatur keseimbangan
sebelah kanan/sisi kanan
Bagian kanan kapal
kapal pengisi bahan bakar
To be Announced
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Tender
Tender ticket
kapal kecil pengangkut kedarat waktu kapal jangkar
system ticket untuk keluar kapal melaui kapal
keci(tender)
Terminal building
tempat /gedung dimana tamu berkumpul sebelum
masuk/keluar kapal,untuk proses pemeriksaan(security
check) registrasi, pengambilan koper dsbnya.
Termination
Traffic director/directing passanger
penghentian kontrak,dipecat
memberikan arah atau menunjukkan kemana tamu
harus pergi
Tug boat
Kapal yg membantu/mendorong kapal
menuju/bersandar
Uniform
Union
USCG
USPH
Vessel
Visitor pass
Voyage
W.T.D
Whales
Wharf
World cruise
x-ray
Yacht
Zero discharge policy
baju seragam
serikat pekerja
United State Coast Guard
United States Public Health
kapal
surat /ijin berkunjung kedalam kapal
Vessel Sanitation Program
Water tight Door(pintu penahan air)
ikan paus.
dermaga
perjalanan keliling dunia
rontgent
kapalpesiar kecil milik pribadi
peraturan yg melarang Dan mengatur pembuangan
kotoran dilaut
219
CRUISE SHIP ONBOARDING
ABOUT ROYAL CARIBBEAN
Our History
Since Royal Caribbean International was founded in 1968, we have been recognized as a leader
in the cruise industry. Throughout these years, our company has evolved in many ways;
however, its essence remains the same: We always strive to provide our guests with the best
vacation through excellence and innovation. Our history is a succession of exciting moments.
Here we share some of our milestones:
1968
Royal Caribbean Cruise Line is founded by three prominent Norwegian shipping companies. By
1970, our first ship – Song of Norway – makes her maiden voyage (in 1978, she is the first ship
to be "stretched" when an 85-foot section was added).
1971 - 1982
Nordic Prince, Sun Viking, and Song of America enter service.
1984
Shipshape is introduced; it is the first program incorporating fitness incentives to the onboard
activities.
1986
Labadie, Royal Caribbean's first exclusive destination, opens on the north coast of Hispaniola.
1988
Royal Caribbean and Admiral Cruises merge. At the same time, Sovereign of the Seas is
launched, signaling the beginning of a growth period in which Royal Caribbean triples in size.
1990
Coco Cay, located near Nassau, Bahamas, is introduced as Royal Caribbean’s second exclusive
destination.
1992
Our environmental program "Save the Waves" is formally launched.
1993
Royal Caribbean goes public, trading in the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol "RCL".
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1997
Royal Caribbean Cruise Line changes its name to Royal Caribbean International to reflect its
global operation and itineraries.
1999
Voyager of the Seas is launched and claims the distinction of being the “world’s largest cruise
ship” – a title that has been claimed by succeeding Royal Caribbean International vessels
through the years.
2001
Radiance of the Seas enters service and is Royal Caribbean’s first ship with gas turbines.
2002
GOLD Anchor Service is launched to emphasize the outstanding, friendly service offered to our
guests.
2004
Royal Caribbean International receives an Achievement in Culinary Excellence Award from the
American Culinary Federation, Inc.
2006
Freedom of the Seas, our first Freedom-class vessel, sets sail for the first time. Liberty of the
Seas and Independence of the Seas complete this class by 2008.
2009
Oasis of the Seas, our first Oasis-class vessel, is launched. With a capacity of 5,400 guests and a
gross tonnage of more than 220,000, Oasis-class vessels are the world’s largest cruise ships.
2010
In 2010, Oasis of the Sea's sister ship, Allure of the Seas enters service with great news for the
whole family: a partnership with DreamWorks that takes entertainment to a new level.
2012
Coco Cay achieves the industries – and our company’s – first Gold Level Eco-Certification for
sustainable tourism.
2013
Royal Caribbean International celebrates 50 million guests; Labadee achieves the industries –
and our company’s – second Gold Level Eco-Certification for sustainable tourism.
2014
Quantum of the Seas, the world’s first “smart ship” and our first Quantum-class vessel, makes
her debut. She is the first ship to offer simulated skydiving and an observation capsule that
provides guests with views from 300 feet above sea level.
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2015
Royal Caribbean International introduces the Royal Suite Class, three suite-category service
levels which offer exclusive amenities, innovative accommodations, and a wide range of
benefits and services. Anthem of the Seas, our second Quantum-class ship, makes her debut.
2016
Harmony of the Seas, our third Oasis-class vessel, is launched. She features the tallest slide at
sea and combines the best elements of the Oasis-class fleet with some of the technologicallyadvanced features of the Quantum-class ships. Ovation of the Seas, our third Quantum-class
vessel, also set sail.
“Between” 2018 to 2021, two additional Quantum-class ships and two more Oasis-class vessels
are expected to join the Royal Caribbean International fleet, ready to “Deliver the Wow” and
add more chapters to our company’s history of excellence.
As we continue moving forward, transforming the cruise industry, we invite you to explore
career opportunities that could put you at the center of our story.
OUR VISION
Our vision is to empower and enable our EMPLOYEES to deliver the best vacation experience to
our GUESTS, thereby generating superior returns to our STAKEHOLDERS and enhancing the
wellbeing of our COMMUNITIES
ANCHORED IN EXCELLENCE
We always provide service with a friendly greeting and a smile.
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We anticipate the needs of our customers.
We make all efforts to exceed our customers' expectations.
We take ownership of any problem that is brought to our attention.
We engage in conduct that enhances our corporate reputation and employee morale.
We are committed to act in the highest ethical manner and respect the rights and dignity of
others.
We are loyal to Royal Caribbean and strive for continuous improvement in everything we do.
WELCOME
FLEET
Quantum Class
The Quantum class of ships is a new leap forward in vessel design with groundbreaking
innovations like Ripcord by iFly, the first skydiving experience at sea. And the North Star, a
jewel-shaped, glass capsule with a spectacular ocean view. Plus, we're introducing
transformational venues like the Seaplex and Two70° that morph from day to night. All these
new onboard features are designed to elicit just one reaction from you: WOW.
QUANTUM OF THE SEAS
ANTHEM OF THE SEAS
OVATION OF THE SEAS
Oasis Class
Onboard
Royal
Caribbean
International,
innovation
and
imagination rule supreme – and never
has it been truer than on our
groundbreaking Oasis® class ships.
Each features seven incredible
neighborhoods, packed with first-atsea experiences: the OceansideAqua
Theater, Starbucks®, Broadway hit musicals Cats and Mamma Mia! 3D movie theater, zip line,
designer shopping at Coach® stores, and much more. There's something for everyone to
discover on the most awe-inspiring ships the world has ever seen.
ALLURE OF THE SEAS
OASIS OF THE SEAS
HARMONY OF THE SEAS
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Freedom Class
Meet our Freedom class -- ships that
ensure you'll never run out of things
to do. Hang ten on the Flow Rider®,
or ice skate, rock climb, and mini golf.
Make a splash in the H2O Zone water
park with water guns and interactive
geysers. Or simply relax in whirlpools
extending 12 feet beyond the sides of
the ship. Plus, check out new features
on Freedom of the Seas® and Liberty
of the Seas® -- including the
DreamWorks Experience, outdoor
movie screen, 3D movie theater, and
more.
FREEDOM OF THE SEAS
LIBERTY OF THE SEAS
INDEPENDENCE OF THE SEAS
Voyager Class
Our Voyager class of ships introduced
a packed lineup of signature
innovations that guests love. Climb
the rock wall 200 feet above the
ocean. Ice skate on the first-ever rink
at sea. Or immerse yourself in the
sights and sounds of the Main-Streetstyle Royal Promenade, perfect for
people watching, designer shopping,
and a cold pint at the British-style
pub. You'll never be at a loss for a new onboard experience.
NAVIGATOR OF THE SEAS
ADVENTURE OF THE SEAS
VOYAGER OF THE SEAS
EXPLORER OF THE SEAS
MARINER OF THE SEAS
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Radiance Class
We built the Radiance class to let the sights of the sea be the star. Every ship has soaring, sunlit
spaces, glass elevators facing the ocean, and more balconies than you'd ever imagine -- plus a
Solarium pool surrounded by lush tropical foliage. Try your hand at mini golf, rock climbing, or a
round of pool on the first self-leveling pools tables at sea. And on the newly renovated
Radiance of the Seas® and Serenade of the Seas®, enjoy new dining and drink venues, an
outdoor movie screen, nursery and more new features.
SERENADE OF THE SEAS
BRILLIANCE OF THE SEAS
RADIANCE OF THE SEAS
JEWEL OF THE SEAS
Vision Class
From Alaska to Hawaii, Mexico to
Asia, our worldly Vision-class ships
can take your curiosity just about
anywhere. Spend an afternoon by the
pool at the adults-only Solarium,
complete with retractable roof. Or
find your next great adventure at the
bungee trampoline, rock-climbing
wall, and mini golf course. When the
sun goes down, enjoy fine dining and
a Broadway-style show. Plus, enjoy
brand new features such as an
outdoor movie screen and nursery on
Splendour of the Seas®, Rhapsody of
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the Seas®, Grandeur of the Seas® and Enchantment of the Seas®.
VISION OF THE SEAS
GRANDEUR OF THE SEAS
RHAPSODY OF THE SEAS
ENCHANTMENT OF THE SEAS
Sovereign and Empress Class
Meet the newly reimagined Majesty
and Empress of the Seas, on tropical
getaways to the Caribbean and
Bahamas departing from Florida
ports. Poolside sun-soakers and
weekend high rollers will love every
minute with high stake thrills at our
newly revamped Casino Royale, Latin
flavor at our Boleros Lounge, and
decadent Sunday Brunch with
complimentary Mimosas or Bloody
Mary's on Empress of the Seas—it's a
quick getaway to a million amazing
moments.
MAJESTY OF THE SEAS
EMPRESS OF THE SEAS
WHERE WE SAIL
Alaska
EXPLORE ALASKA BY LAND & SEA.
No journey stays with you, mind and
soul, like an expedition through
Alaska. From the blue ice of massive
glacial fields to the stunning grandeur
of the scenery and wildlife, everything
in Alaska is big, bold and absolutely
breathtaking.
Including
the
adventures.
Royal
Caribbean
International® takes care of all the
planning, transportation and lodging for you. Travel in comfort on our deluxe motor coaches
and on the Wilderness Express®, our luxurious, plush glass-domed train cars that offer
panoramic views of the grand Alaskan frontier. Plus, enjoy the fully escorted multi-night land
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tours (which can be taken before or after your cruise) that spend at least one night in Denali
National Park.
Asia
THE FAR EAST: IT'S NOT AS FAR AS YOU THINK.
When was the last time you used all
five of your senses? At the same
time? Visit The Far East, a
kaleidoscope of exotic sights, sounds,
tastes and experiences (we think that
covers all five, but who's counting?).
From the beauty and tranquility of
ancient temples, to the distinctive
flavors of the curries and satays at a
Bangkok cafe, to world-class shopping
in the bustling open-air markets of
Hong Kong – we can't wait to give you
the chance to unleash your own
adventure in one of the world's most
amazing destinations.
Australia / New Zealand
EXPERIENCE THE WONDER DOWN UNDER.
Royal Caribbean International® invites you to the home of kangaroos, koalas and kiwis. Take
one of our 12- or 14-night cruises to Australia, New Zealand and the South Pacific islands for an
extraordinary vacation like no other. Or stay a while longer with a cruise tour for an in-depth
look at the best adventures this side of the southern hemisphere. Ports of call include
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enchanting destinations like Sydney, Melbourne, Wellington, Christchurch, Tasmania, Fiji and
more. If you've ever dreamed of an exotic cruise to the South Pacific, it has just come true.
Bahamas
ADD "ADVENTURE" TO YOUR RESUME.
Close to the East Coast of the United States lay the Bahamas—an unforgettable escape from
harsh winters in the north. On a Bahamas cruise with Royal Caribbean International®, you'll get
to swim with dolphins and tropical fish in turquoise waters, or soar above the sea in a parasail.
Then explore the islands' thrilling history as a pirate haven and one-time "Privateer's Republic" - with Blackbeard himself as the magistrate. It's a slice of pirate paradise you'll never forget.
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Bermuda
WITH BUILDINGS THIS COLORFUL, IMAGINE THE REST.
Just 600 nautical miles off the coast of North Carolina (if you don't know what a nautical mile is
our captain will be happy to explain it to you), this enchanting island is celebrated for its pastel
painted houses, brilliantly colorful gardens, cricket matches and charming shorts. In addition to
pink-sand beaches and excellent shopping, Bermuda's proximity to the U.S. makes it an ideal
destination for a getaway cruise vacation with Royal Caribbean International®.
Canada / New England
ROCKY SHORES AND LIGHTHOUSES
MEET HISTORIC NEW WORLD
CHARM.
With Royal Caribbean International®,
you'll discover the unmistakable
charm of New England and eastern
Canada. A distinctive history and
natural beauty (much like yourself
we imagine) gives the region an
alluring appeal. There's no better
time to visit than the fall. The foliage
is brilliant in every imaginable color,
lighthouses dot the coastline, and
there's always an authentic lobster
bake to be savored! Lobster bibs
included.
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Caribbean
YOU'LL FIND WATER IN EVERY SHADE OF BLUE.
When it comes to beautiful beaches and sparkling blue waters, the Caribbean really is in a
league of its own. And no one does the Caribbean better than Royal Caribbean International®.
There are countless adventures within reach on your cruise vacation—get up close and
personal with stingrays in Grand Cayman. Trek the El Yunque Rain Forest in Puerto Rico and the
Mayan Ruins in Cozumel. Or simply relax and soak up the sun in one of the best regions for a
vacation in the world.
Europe
WHEN DESCRIBING EUROPE & THE MEDITERRANEAN, "WOW" PRETTY MUCH SUMS IT UP.
From the fjords of Norway to the waterways
of Venice to the ruins of the Mediterranean,
explore the richness and beauty of Europe in
a totally new way on one of our cruises or
cruise tours. Stand in awe before the works
of Michelangelo in Italy or Gaudí’s distinctive
architecture in Spain. Witness the remains of
ancient civilizations in Greece and Turkey.
Tour Palace Square in St. Petersburg, Russia.
If you're ready for the vacation of a lifetime,
you've found it. Plan your adventure today.
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Hawaii
IN HAWAII, NATURE AND SURFERS
STEAL THE SHOW.
Explore the islands, Maui's waterfalls
and winding back roads on a fourwheel adventure through Kauai.
Discover lush rain forests and orchidscented botanical gardens on Hawaii,
and hike Oahu's Diamond Head and
Koko
Head
volcanoes.
Come
experience the wonders of Hawaii on
an incredible Royal Caribbean
International® cruise vacation.
Panama
THE MOST SCENIC SHORTCUT IN THE
WORLD.
The Panama Canal isn't just the
quickest link between the Atlantic
and the Pacific, it's also the most
beautiful. On Royal Caribbean's
Panama Canal cruises you'll visit the
verdant shores of Panama – or
simply sail through this stunning
turn-of-the-century
engineering
achievement. Watch the famous cliff
divers in Acapulco, or set off on an
exciting raft trip through the jungles
of Costa Rica.
South America
IT'S NOT JUST THE WEATHER THAT'S
HOT HERE.
South America is a place of
extremes—from steamy beaches and
rainforests to Brazil’s unique Cabo
Frio, featuring seawater currents
from the South Pole. From the
passionate dances in the tango
parlors of Buenos Aires, to the quiet,
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glittering golden churches that line the streets. What unites them all is a great love of beauty,
and you... hopefully.
Transatlantic
AN ACTION-PACKED VOYAGE, WITH TREASURES AWAITING.
Why not choose a transatlantic voyage on which there is never a dull moment (unless, of
course, you like dull moments)? And then discover the adventure of exploring foreign ports and
shores, while returning to the comfort of your stateroom every night? In a world where
everything is harried and hurried, imagine the unique thrill of taking a step into history -- to a
time when traveling was the adventure—and setting out to cruise across the horizon.
Repositioning
SPICE UP YOUR VACATION WITH A
ONE-OF-A-KIND JOURNEY.
Whether you're a cruising newbie or
a seasoned sailor, our Repositioning
cruise vacations are worthy of
exploration. Since these cruises
typically sail from one destination to
another -- departing from one port
and ending in a different one -- they
offer a blend of exciting cities or
ports you wouldn't see on our other
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itineraries. So why not enjoy the authentic Italian dining of Rome, dive among the coral reefs of
Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt, or let your jaw drop at the sight of Gaudí’s distinctive architecture in
Barcelona?
AWARDS
A few of our most notable awards for this year and last:
North America
Travvy Awards 2016 - US
Best Cruise Line Overall
Best Cruise Line, Caribbean
Best Cruise Line, LGBT
Best Cruise Line, Contemporary
Best Cruise Line, Family
Travel Weekly Readers’ Choice 2015 – US
Best Cruise Line Overall
Best Cruise Line, Caribbean
Best Cruise Line, Sales & Service
Best Cruise Ship, New: Quantum of the Seas
Europe
Travel Weekly Globe Travel Awards 2016 – UK
Best Mainstream Cruise Company
Cruise Media Group Excellence Awards 2016 - Spain
Best Ship in the Mediterranean - Allure of the Seas
Crucero 10 2016 - Spain
Best Cruise Company for Families
Grand Travel Award 2016 - Norway
Best Cruise Line
Asia Pacific
Best of the Best Family Services/Products Award 2016 by Parents World – Singapore
Best in Entertainment for Cruise Ship Vacation – Mariner of the Seas
TTG China 2015
Best Cruise Operator
TTG Travel Awards – Asia 2015
Best Cruise Operator
WORKING ONBOARD
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WELCOME TO A CAREER WITHOUT BOUNDARIES
A game-changer in the industry - and for your career: Celebrating 40 years as a leader in the
industry, Royal Caribbean International has been Anchored in Excellence, and consistent in
providing the best vacations for our guests. Our success is achieved through the incredible
talent and collaboration of our shipboard teams, through our large and complex operations;
and as we continue to grow and evolve as a company, we always challenge ourselves to
innovate and exceed expectations.
Life onboard is unique, and you may wonder if this is the right environment for you. Consider
this:
Day in the Life
Even though shipboard life is fast-paced and the work hours can be long, there's also time to
have fun and relax!
ASSIGNMENTS
Assignments are determined by position, and length can vary based on the particular rank.
Senior management hotel officers typically have four-month assignments, followed by eight
weeks of vacation; marine officer assignments are generally ten weeks onboard followed by ten
weeks’ vacation for senior positions, and seven weeks for more entry-level roles; assignments
for all other positions average approximately four to six months working onboard, with six to
eight weeks of vacation time.
ACCOMMODATIONS
Since space is at a premium, all cabins are designed to maximize efficiency, and depending on
your role onboard, you may share a cabin with one or more teammates. Working and living in
close proximity with your colleagues will take some adjusting, especially in the first six to eight
weeks. However, this is an excellent opportunity to develop strong friendships with fun and
interesting people from all over the world.
WORK ENVIRONMENT
See more. Do more. Be more. Onboard our state-of-the-art ships, while traveling to exciting
ports of call, you can excel in every aspect of who you are – ambassador of your country, stellar
crewmember, and consummate professional, collaborative team member. Our award-winning
operations are the perfect environment to achieve your career and personal goals. With over
5,000 guests (onboard our Oasis class ships), up to 26 dining options, and any number of
activities all going on throughout the ship, teamwork is the key, and every day there are endless
opportunities to deliver the "Wow!", and learn something new.
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Though it can be very rewarding, it can also be challenging, and it will probably take some time
to adjust to the pace of it all. Because it’s a 24-hour operation, you can expect to work long
hours, seven days a week. Time off is limited, even while the ship is in port; however, you will
still have opportunities to explore different destinations.
SAFETY ONBOARD
In order to ensure that everyone is familiar with safety procedures (in case of an emergency),
you will be expected to participate in relevant training sessions and drills that occur on a regular
basis.
KEEPING IN TOUCH
Eager to share stories about your adventure with family and friends? Don’t just send a postcard
(though you can do that, too!)… There are several convenient options available:
INTERNET CAFÉS
Staying connected to family and friends through the internet is simple. Most of our ships have
Internet Cafés where you can stay connected. If you have a laptop, some ships have wireless
connection available in your cabin. (A small per-minute fee will apply in both cases.)
PHONE CALLS
Telephone communication is available via satellite onboard; however, because it is very costly
and reception could be unpredictable, crew members usually prefer to call friends/family from
public telephones that are conveniently located at most ports. (Phone cards are also available
for purchase onboard, and at most ports of call.)
MAIL
Mail is usually received at every homeport and is distributed as soon as possible. Sending mail is
easy, and stamps are available at any port where you can send mail.
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DIVERSITY ONBOARD
At Royal Caribbean, we take pride in embracing different cultures - we all come from different
backgrounds, to become one team. Curious about customs in other countries? Learn from a
native. With over 100 nationalities throughout our fleet, you're bound to make friends from at
least several of the places you'd like to visit.
STAYING HEALTHY
BE FIT
Staying healthy is a priority that should be maintained regardless of where you are in the world,
and as you travel to all the exciting places around the world with us, we want to help ensure
that you’re able to follow a positive lifestyle, too. Onboard our ships, we have healthy food
options, as well as workout facilities available, so you can continue working toward your
personal fitness goals.
MEDICAL FACILITIES
Onboard our ships, we have state-of-the-art medical facilities for our guests and our crew, and
a professional medical staff to assist, in the case of a medical situation. While the medical team
is ready to assist in any urgent situation, they shouldn’t be considered your primary medical
care provider. It is important to join the ship healthy and ready to work. If you have any
prescriptions that have been cleared as part of your pre-employment medical exam, those
should be filled for the duration of your assignment before you join. It can be very expensive to
fill prescriptions in many ports of call.
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As an additional benefit for our crew, our medical teams also provide healthy initiatives to help
prevent health complications so you can be at your best in all aspects.
APPLICATION PROCESS
As a hospitality professional, you may already have a position in mind that would best suit your
qualifications and career goals. Starting a career on board is not only a professional challenge,
but it's also a significant change in lifestyle. It may take some time to acclimate to your new
environment, but with flexibility, an open mind, and enthusiastic professionalism, you will soon
become an essential part of our team.
We want you to
o be successful, and the most important part of that success is YOU! Throughout
the interview process, please be sure to ask your Royal Caribbean International representative
any questions you may have. Ready to get started?
Browsing the Jobs Database
As you might've already noticed, we designed this website to be user-friendly,
user friendly, so you can easily
and quickly search for the right opportunity.
There are two options:
Feel free to explore either the Hotel Operations or Marine Operations departments to find
opportunities in each area.
Click in the top-right
right corner of the screen, in the "Search Jobs" box, to seek a specific position.
Registering on the Website
If you're just browsing around, and would like to sign up for our quarterly newsletter, please
click here.
ere. If you'd like to apply for a specific position that's on this database, we encourage you
to apply online. Just find the position for which you'd like to apply, and click on "Apply Online".
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Please keep in mind that the more relevant details you provide in your application, the better
our recruiters will be able to best match you to the right opportunity. Once you have registered,
you'll be able to update your profile later, and perhaps even apply to another relevant
opportunity when it becomes available (Be sure to keep your username and password, for
future visits!).
Submitting Your Resume and Cover Letter
We'll look forward to receiving your resume and cover letter through the online application
(you will be able to send them to us as attachments). Keeping in mind that your resume is a
snapshot representation of your professional qualifications, it's an excellent opportunity to
portray with confidence all that you've achieved, to reflect your potential contributions to our
team
The Interview Process
If your qualifications fit well with the requirements for a particular opportunity, a Royal
Caribbean International representative will reach out to you, for a preliminary screening.
Depending on the role, there may be two (or more) follow-up interviews with other Royal
Caribbean International Human Resource and Operational representatives. These conversations
are intended as excellent opportunities for us to learn more about your background, and for
you to learn more about the position and the company. Take advantage and, ask as many
questions as you'd like. Once the decision is made, we will notify you of your status.
Once you are ready to Be Hired
If you are approved, and decide to embark on this exciting new journey, there will be many
details to consider, in preparation for your first assignment. Among them are three important
items:
Fit For Duty
In the interest of health and safety, all At Sea Employees must successfully complete a preemployment medical examination (PEME) prior to joining the ship. This is a thorough medical
examination, to ensure that the crew member is able to perform the required duties of the
position and any safety training and emergency drills.
Background Check
Clearance of a criminal background check is required for all crew members.
Ready to Travel?
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Our ships travel to many amazing destinations, and in order to be able to work on board, you
will need certain documents. You must, of course, have a passport from your country, and it
must be valid for at least one month after the end of your contract (passport validity
requirements also depend on the itinerary of the ship). Also, depending on the itinerary, you
may need a Seaman's book, and/or additional visas (i.e. C-1/D visa, travel visas, Schengen visa)
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYMENT
At Royal Caribbean International we are an Equal Opportunity Employer, and we are committed
to providing you with a healthy, safe, and respectable work environment, free of discrimination
or harassment.
We expect all crew members to act with the highest ethical standards and principles, and to
comply with key policies that also convey the importance of mutual respect and tolerance of
the differences among us.
Thank you for your interest in Royal Caribbean International. We hope to see you on board,
soon!
RESUME TIPS
Always list employers in descending order (starting with your current employer)
Clearly state the name of each employer, and the nature of the business
If applicable, indicate the rating of the hotel or restaurant (stars, diamonds, and rosettes)
Indicate the size of the organization
When indicating period of employment, always use this format: mm/yy - mm/yy
Note at least three achievements you accomplished within each role
Include the reason(s) for separation from each employer
If there are any breaks in periods of employment, explain why
Include relevant figures - like gross sales, cost avoided, and size of team
We'll look forward to learning more about you!
INTERVIEW TIPS
We know you're nervous... and that's perfectly normal, of course. But please keep in mind that
our initial perception of you is already positive - that's why we're reaching out to you, for an
interview! Here are some helpful tips:
Be promptly available at your appointment time (or maybe even a couple of minutes early).
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Be at your professional best. A conservative business suit is always a good choice. Nice tie for
the gentlemen; minimal jewelry, for the ladies. Pay attention to the details - we will.
Be prepared with a copy of your resume in front of you (and have ready access to an electronic
copy you can send quickly - just in case)
Speak clearly, and answer concisely the questions asked of you (use examples whenever
possible).
Be engaged in the conversation; listen carefully, and have a list of relevant questions to ask the
interviewer, at the end of the conversation (you might find that most of them will be answered
throughout the conversation, but it's good to have your own list ready, just in case).
Most importantly, smile, be positive, and be YOURSELF... that's whom we really want to get to
know!
FAQ
We appreciate your considering Royal Caribbean International as a potential employer. If
you've never worked onboard, you may have questions about what to expect regarding
shipboard life with our company. Below are the answers to the most frequently asked
questions?
Where do Royal Caribbean International ships sail?
Our ships sail around the world and visit exciting and unique destinations.
What are the requirements to work onboard Royal Caribbean ships?
Regardless of the position for which you are applying, to qualify for shipboard employment you
must have a valid passport, and the ability to:
Obtain a C1-D visa (unless you are Canadian or a US citizen or resident)
Pass RCCL's pre-employment medical examination.
Obtain relevant itinerary-driven visas (i.e. Schengen).
Present the proper qualifications/certifications required, based on your role.
Pass a criminal background check.
What is a C1-D visa?
A C1-D visa is a non-immigrant visa issued by US embassies around the world. This visa allows
crew members to transit through US ports. If offered a position, Royal Caribbean International
will provide a letter to support your application. This visa is not required for Canadians or US
citizens or residents.
What is a Schengen visa?
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Some nationalities are required to obtain this visa in order to enter countries that are part of
the Schengen territory, in Europe. Your Hiring partner or HR representative can help you
determine if you need to apply for a Schengen visa.
What is a letter of employment?
A letter of employment (LOE) is a document provided by Royal Caribbean International (or
Hiring Partner) that states the date you are scheduled to join our team, the vessel you are
joining, and the position for which you have been hired. You must have this document available
at all times when travelling to join the ship.
Where do I get the pre-employment medical (PEME)?
All Royal Caribbean crew members are required to complete an extensive pre-employment
medical examination prior to joining the ship. In most cases, the examination is at the
employees' expense. The examination should be conducted through one of RCL's approved
medical facilities. Once the medical examination is complete and approved by our corporate
medical department, employees will be cleared to travel. This medical documentation will then
be valid for two years.
What languages are required to work onboard?
English is the official language onboard our vessels, therefore, all employees must be able to
read, write and speak English. Some positions have specific language requirements, but in
general English is sufficient; however, because of our international guests and exciting
itineraries, it is helpful if you speak additional languages, including (but certainly not limited to):
Italian, German, French, and Spanish. Additional language skills are always a plus!
Does Royal Caribbean International hire couples?
Royal Caribbean International welcomes couples onboard. However, each applicant is assessed
individually based on his/her qualifications, and although every effort is made to accommodate
couples to be assigned to the same ship, we cannot guarantee that they will be assigned to the
same ship, since - as is understandable - business needs take precedence.
Is medical attention available to employees?
Of course! Our crew's safety and wellbeing is our highest priority. Should employees become ill
while onboard, each ship has a team of dedicated medical professionals that will provide
assistance at no cost to the crew member. However, while the medical team is ready to assist in
any urgent situation, they shouldn't be considered your primary medical care provider. It is
important to join the ship healthy and ready to work. If you have any prescriptions that have
been cleared as part of your pre-employment medical exam, those should be filled for the
duration of your assignment before you join. It can be very expensive to fill prescriptions in
many ports of call.
Do I have to wear a uniform?
As a team, we like to project a consistent and professional image; this is why we have carefully
chosen a uniform for each position onboard. Uniforms will be provided onboard, and though
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the cost will be subsidized by the company, some crew members must purchase part of their
uniforms as well. Your recruiter will discuss this with you in more detail.
How long would I be onboard before going back home?
A contract ranges anywhere from three to approximately eight months, depending on the
position. Most senior management roles have 4-month contracts while most of the rest of the
positions have 6/8 month contracts. Employees live onboard for the total length of their
contracts.
Do I get time off while onboard?
Sure! Because ships have guests onboard 7 days a week, you may not get a 24-hour period off;
however, you will still have time to rest, visit the ports, and participate in fun events.
What happens if I have a family emergency?
In the case of family emergencies, Royal Caribbean International will make every effort to
accommodate the crew member's requests.
To which ship would I be assigned?
Once you have been offered a position, you will be advised which ship you will be joining.
Please keep in mind that assignments are provided based on business needs, therefore, you
could join any of our beautiful ships!
How do I get to the ship?
Depending on your location and the ship's location, you may fly to the nearest airport. In most
cases, this will be at the crewmembers' expense for the first contract.
What should I pack?
Since cabin space is very limited, it is recommended that employees bring only what is needed.
If you are flying, you may want to check the luggage allowance with the airline. Some
suggestions would be: Clothing: jeans and/ or long pants, sweater, shirts, belt(s), shorts and tshirts, appropriate shoes, tennis and/or beach shoes, and swimsuit Toiletry: deodorant, razors,
brush/comb, toothbrush/paste, shampoo, shaving cream, sunblock. Other: travel alarm clock,
medication, beach towel, camera, Walkman//MP3 player, and hair dryer.
Are any items prohibited?
Objects that may represent a hazard are prohibited. Examples include weapons, clothing irons,
hot plates, candles, incense, and any other items that may create a fire hazard, or are deemed
unsafe by shipboard security. (Curling irons, flat irons, and hair dryers are allowed.)
Does Royal Caribbean International provide accommodations while I am onboard?
Forget about paying rent! Royal Caribbean International provides accommodations for all
shipboard employees. Depending on your position you may share your cabin with a fellow
crewmember. Because space is limited onboard, cabins and bathrooms are relatively small
compared to land-based accommodations, but don't worry there are plenty amenities for you
to enjoy when you are off duty.
What if I don't get along with my roommate?
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Working onboard is a great opportunity not only to grow professionally, but also to make
friends from all over the world. While different cultures act differently and sometimes it takes
time to adjust, we believe that being open and respectful always leads to good relationships.
Communication is usually the key to get along with your roommate; however, if for some
reason you don't feel comfortable you can check with supervisor who will try to facilitate a
cabin switch.
How do I get paid while onboard?
Employees are paid in U.S. dollars twice a month.
How do I send my money home?
You may wire transfer money to your land-based bank account. Please note that a nominal fee
applies.
Are taxes deducted?
For U.S. citizens and residents, federal taxes are automatically deducted from pay. All other
employees are responsible for filing their own taxes upon returning to their home country.
Should I bring cash with me?
We suggest you bring at least $200-300 cash in U.S. dollars and/or a major credit card, to cover
out-of-pocket expenses during travel and before receiving your first pay.
Where will I have my meals?
Our chefs create for our crew a variety of dishes from different parts of the world, providing
options for a healthy and well-balanced diet. All meals are served in crew-allocated dining
areas.
Do you have laundry facilities for employees?
Yes, there are laundry facilities available for the crew.
What type of electrical system will be in my cabin?
Cabins offer US 110V and 220V outlets.
Do employees have internet access?
Yes, each ship has an internet café that is available to employees, with several computers that
have internet access (nominal per-minute fees apply). For those who would like to bring their
own laptop, WI-FI spots are also available (same per-minute fees apply).
How do I call home?
You can purchase minutes to use for long-distance calls from the ship.
Is to possible to receive mail while onboard?
Yes! There is a central location where all mail is received and then distributed to the ships. Your
shipboard HR team will be able to provide more details.
Would my cell phone work onboard?
Cell phone service is available onboard; however, international roaming rates do apply. You
may want to check the rates with your provider before using your cell phone.
Would I be able to buy some necessities (i.e. toiletries) onboard?
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The Crew Shop is a general store for crew on every ship. It sells all sorts of things you might
want during a contract and charges low prices too.
Can I make purchases in the Gift Shop?
The gift shop is available to crewmembers during certain designated hours. Royal Caribbean
International employees are entitled to a 20% discount.
Do I get to visit the ports?
Definitely! When you are not on duty, you are welcome to explore the amazing destinations we
visit. Just make sure you are back on time!
Can I participate in Shore Excursions?
As a service to our guests, we offer organized tours when visiting the ports. If space is available,
employees are welcome to enjoy the excursions at a discounted price.
Does Royal Caribbean International have a drug policy?
Royal Caribbean International is a drug-free company, and we have a zero tolerance policy for
consumption or possession of illegal substances.
Are employees allowed to smoke?
When off duty, employees are allowed to smoke in the designated smoking areas. Smoking in
crew cabins is prohibited.
Will I be entitled to discounts for my family?
As part of RCCL, we offer different discount programs for our employees and their families.
Depending on your position, you may have to wait for some time before qualifying for this
benefit.
Are there any activities to enjoy during my time off?
At Royal Caribbean International we believe in creating a fun work environment. We have a
crew activities team onboard each ship in charge of hosting different events for our crew. From
parties to sport tournaments, all activities are designed for our crew to enjoy life onboard.
Can I socialize in Guest Areas?
Access to guest areas will depend on your position. Please check with your supervisor. If you
are allowed to visit guest areas, please keep in mind that guests always come first! Casinos,
guest swimming pools, and whirlpools are for guest use only.
Are there places to exercise?
Yes! Each Royal Caribbean International ship is equipped with a crew gym. We encourage you
to take advantage of it and work out at your leisure.
Are there places to socialize with my teammates?
Yes, there are different types of areas where you can socialize with your colleagues, including
the crew bar, and other lounges and common crew areas.
Can family and friends come and visit me for the day?
Employees can apply for a one-day visitors' pass for family and friends; this must be requested
with advanced notice. Please check with your supervisor for more details.
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Is there a hair salon onboard?
Each ship features a spa and hair salon onboard, and treatments are offered at a discounted
price to crewmembers. Appointments are necessary and, as expected, guests have priority.
Do I have safety responsibilities?
In the unlikely case of an emergency, we need to be ready. Therefore, all crewmembers must
attend emergency training, and are required to participate in boat drills.
Will I always work on the same ship?
Assignments are based on many factors, and priority is understandably given to business need.
Generally, there are periods where an individual is assigned to a particular ship, in order to
provide an opportunity for the teams to build relationships and consistency. However, as with
every aspect of shipboard life, flexibility is key. You might be transferred to another ship as
necessary.
Who are the Hiring Partners, and what do they do?
Royal Caribbean International has a network of hiring partners to assist in meeting recruitment
goals around the world. Hiring partners are third party service providers; they are not
employees of our company. Only those listed on this site are authorized to recruit for our
company.
If specific tools are required to perform my job, do I need to bring them?
No, all the tools you need to perform your job will be provided by the company.
We know there's a lot to consider. As you go through the application process, our recruiters
and hiring partners will be glad to provide guidance, and more relevant details to answer any
additional questions about shipboard life.
WHAT TO PACK?
Since cabin space is very limited, it is recommended that employees bring only what is needed.
If you are flying, you may want to check the luggage allowance with the airline. Some
suggestions would be:
CLOTHING:
Jeans and / or long pants
Sweater
Shirts
Belts
Shorts
T-shirts
Appropriate shoes
Tennis and / or beach shoes
Swimsuit
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TOILETRY:
Deodorant
Razors
Brush / comb
Toothbrush / paste
Shampoo
Shaving cream
Sunblock
OTHER:
Travel alarm clock
Medication
Beach towel
Camera
MP3 player
Hair dryer
Thank you again for your interest in Royal Caribbean International. We'll hope to see you
onboard soon.
ABOUT HIRING PARTNERS
Royal Caribbean has a network of hiring partners to assist in meeting recruitment goals around
the world. Hiring partners are third party service providers; they are not employees of our
company.
Only those listed on this site are authorized to recruit for our company. If you received a
solicitation from a company that is not listed on our site, please report it to [email protected] C
The hiring partner's responsibilities are to source, pre-screen, and present qualified applicants
for final approval by a recruiter from our team. The hiring partner does not have the authority
to hire applicants or decide on an assignment for approved applicants. They are acting on
instruction from our recruitment or scheduling teams.
Once an applicant receives a ship assignment, the hiring partner will issue a Letter of
Employment as instructed by a Royal Caribbean scheduler. The hiring partner will assist new
hires with their visa applications, and provide guidance for medical and travel arrangements.
They also provide company orientation and information about shipboard life.
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After the new hires join their assigned ship, they become employees of our company and will
work directly with the Human Resource office on the ship and their scheduler for future
assignments.
Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd. pays their hiring partners for their services and does not allow the
collection of administrative fees, agency fees, or processing fees from job applicants. Once
approved by a Recruiter, there are costs involved with joining the ship (passport, seaman’s
books, national identification documents, medicals, airlines tickets, certifications and license as
required for the position) but there is no fee associated with obtaining an interview, position or
ship assignment with the company. If you successfully complete all of the requirements and are
able to join your assigned ship, the cost of travel visa(s) will be reimbursed once you join the
ship, services charges or associated fees for obtaining the visa are not eligible for
reimbursement.
If you suspect or know you are being asked to pay or offer a bribe for or on RCL’s behalf, we
encourage you to report it to our scams hotline: 1-855-292-4685 or email us at
[email protected]
If you are interested in a job with our company that is not listed on this website, we invite you
to contact one of our hiring partners. Please only contact the hiring partner closest to your
permanent address. Submitting applications to more than one hiring partner could result in
your disqualification as a candidate.
Thank you again for your interest in Royal Caribbean International.
FIND YOUR LOCAL AUTHORIZED PARTNER
Please select your country of residence from the list below to find the nearest authorized Hiring
Partner. If your country of residence is not listed, we apologize for the inconvenience, but we
currently do not have a partnership developed in your country. You may apply online if a
position you are qualified for is available, please check our job opportunities page for current
postings.
Only the Partners listed here are authorized to provide recruitment and placement services for
any of the brands operated by Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd. They have been certified to meet
company and MLC 2006 guidelines.
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You will note that some are listed as "Certified Hiring Partner", these agencies are regularly
audited, they are certified and authorized to provide Recruitment and processing services for
the company.
Those listed as "Authorized Referral Sources" are partners that are authorized to refer
interested applicants or resumes to the company. The services they provide are limited and
therefore are not considered a full service Hiring Partner.
INDONESIA
Status Certified Hiring Partner, Hiring For Hotel and Marine
PT. Equinox Bahari Utama
Telephone 6221 79187006
[email protected]
Website http://www.ebu.co.id
PT. Samudera Indonesia Ship Management
Telephone 62 21 6907130
[email protected]
Website http://www.samudera.id
Speedy Global
Telephone +61 7 3123 2861
[email protected]
Website https://Speedy.Global
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Welcome aboard!
Onboarding
Thank you for considering Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd. as your future employer!We know that
you are excited to start your new adventure, and we also know thereis a lot to do and to
prepare. As you have discussed with your onboardingcoordinator, there are several steps that
you need to go through before youare finally ready to join one of our amazing ships.
To help make the process smoother, we are sending you this guide to serve as achecklist of
requirements, and as a reference for the things that you need to knowas a potential member of
one of our teams. Let’s get started!
Your checklist:
STEP 1 - BACKGROUND CHECK REQUIREMENTS
2 Reference Letters from current/previous employer/s
Criminal background report from local police/law enforcement agency
STEP 2 - NEW HIRE FORMS
New Hire Data Form and Copy of Passport
Gateway City Acknowledgement Form
Shipboard Drug and Alcohol Form
Life Insurance Beneficiary Form
STEP 3 - OTHER REQUIREMENTS
Passport
Training Certificates
• STCW (Seafarer’s Training Certificate &Watch keeping)
• SSA (Ship Security Awareness) For Pullmantur new hires/rehires only
Seaman’s Book
Letter of Employment
Flight Itinerary
Visas Required
STEP 4 - PRE-EMPLOYMENT MEDICAL EXAMINATION (PEME)
PEME Form A & B
Medical Certificates for Service at Sea (from approved clinic/hospital)
STEP 5 - Learning Made Simple
STEP 6 - RCLCrewTravel.com
Step 1: Background Check
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At Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd., your safety and security, as well as that ofeveryone onboard
our ships, is our highest priority. With that said, backgroundand previous employment checks
remain a crucial part of our hiring process.All prospective new hires are required to submit
reference letters from current orprevious employers, and police clearance.
REFERENCE LETTERS
• Must be in English
• Should come from current or previous employers and signed byimmediate supervisor or
representative of human resource department
• Files should be named accordingly:
Reference01_LastName_FirstName
Reference02_LastName_FirstName
Example: Reference01_Cruz_John.pdf
POLICE CLEARANCE
• Must be in English
• From the country in which you have resided for the lastseven (7) years, minimally
• If not in English, you must also send a certified translationof the background results
• File should be named accordingly:
Police Clearance_LastName_FirstName
Example: Police Clearance_Cruz_John.pdf
• Please obtain the letters and clearance and submit themto your coordinator at your earliest
convenience.Remember that all documents must be completely clearand easy to read, and
supplied to us in pdf or jpg format
IMPORTANT: If you have lived in more than one (1) address/city/countrywithin the last seven
(7) years, you must submit a local police recordfor each city/country.
Step 2: New Hire Forms
This is another easy step. Just make sure you complete all the formsand send them back along
with a copy of your passport, as soon aspossible, to avoid any delays.We prefer that you scan
and e-mail the forms to your onboardingcoordinator as it is a more efficient way to receive the
data.
Please send Approval Confirmation Letter and New Hire Formswithin 48 hours of accepting
your offer.
New Hire Data Form
Please fill out the New Hire Data Form accurately and completely.
Copy of Passport
Please submit a color copy of your passport along with the forms outlinedabove. Passports
must be valid for at least the duration of your contractplus one (1) month. If your passport
expires within the next year, pleaseapply for a renewal as soon as possible. Please submit color
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copy of theC1/D Visa (if applicable)don’t have a passport? Please note that you will be required
to obtain one
Beforeyou are offered an assignment; it is best to apply for your passportas soon as possible.
Gateway City Acknowledgement Form
Please carefully read, complete, print out, and sign this form. Please beadvised that once you
have chosen your permanent gateway city, you willalways fly in to and out of this location
(unless you move and submit anew form).
Shipboard Drug and Alcohol Policy Form
All employees are required to read through, understand, and sign this form,which outlines our
shipboard employee drug and alcohol policy.Please read carefully, print out, and sign before
emailing this form back.
Life Insurance Beneficiary Form
The purpose of this form is to designate a beneficiary for our Life InsurancePlan that covers you
while you are signed on to any of our ships.Please complete, print, and sign.
Please fill out the forms completely and submit them along with a copy of your passport to your
coordinator at your earliestconvenience. Remember that all documents must be completely
clear and easy to read. All documents must be supplied to usin pdf or jpg format. The file
should be named according to your document and last name, first name.
Example: Shipboard Drug and Alcohol Policy Form_Cruz_John.pdf
IMPORTANT:
We encourage youtocomplete the formselectronically, however,please note that we need your
Actual signature (no electronicsignatures, sorry!), so print andsign the forms before
emailingthem to us.
NEW HIRE GATEWAY CITY ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
Crew Member Name..................................
Unique Employee ID..............................
Hiring Partner Company Name.................................
Hiring Partner Employee Name..................................
I understand that my permanent repatriation airport (Gateway City) will be:Gateway
City.................................. Gateway City Codeonce hired, the assigned Gateway City listed above
will remain my point of originand return. I understand that if I was to request a change of
Gateway City, aGateway City Change Request (GCCR) Form must be completed and submitted
forprocessing, according to the guidelines set by the company. This includespresentation of
official documentation to substantiate a (recent) permanent changeof residence, such as
Driving License, lease, or utility bill. Bank statements are notaccepted. In the event this also
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includes a change of country of residence,governmental proof of legal residence is also
required (e.g. visa).
I acknowledge that I have read and understood the above statement.
______________________ ___________________________
Crew Member Signature Date
______________________ ___________________________
Crew Member Name....................................................
Unique Employee ID …………………………………………..
Original – For Crew Member Copy – Retained For File
Shipboard Drug and Alcohol Policy
Acknowledgement of Policy and Consent for Urine Drug Test
Policy:
• Every shipboard employee is required to understand this policy and is expected to adhere to
the policywhile employed onboard a Royal Caribbean International or Celebrity Cruises ship.
• No shipboard employee shall use, possess or sell illegal drugs. Such shipboard employees are
subject tocriminal prosecution by local authorities and/or the governing flag-state of the ship.
• No watch keeping employee, or any employee holding a position as described in the Safe
Manning
Certificate, while on duty or eight (8) hours prior to the start of duty, may consume alcohol,
illegal drugs,intoxicating substances, or anaesthetizing substances.
• No off-duty shipboard employee shall have a blood alcohol content (BAC) above 0.08 percent.
• No on-duty shipboard employee shall have a blood alcohol content (BAC) above 0.04 percent.
• A shipboard employee found to have a concentration of alcohol in the blood greater than the
limitsdescribed above is considered in violation of this policy and shall be relieved of duty
immediately andsubject to disciplinary action up to and including termination of employment.
• Employees may enjoy alcoholic beverages including beer, wine and spirits in designated
employee
Lounges. Employees who are permitted to socialize in designated areas may also enjoy
alcoholic beveragesin public lounges.
Consent & Acknowledgement:
I am an applicant for employment with Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd. (The “Company”). I am
providing aurine specimen voluntarily with the understanding that it will be tested for illegal
drugs and other drugsbeing used in a manner or for purposes other than as prescribed. I further
understand that failure to consentto this urine drug test will be considered a withdrawal of my
application for employment.
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I understand the results of my urine test will remain confidential and will be used only for the
purpose ofdetermining the suitability of my employment with the Company. I further
understand that determiningsuch suitability is within the total discretion of the Company, that
a positive result of my urine test willresult in the rejection of my application for employment or
in the termination of my employment with theCompany if I start work before the test results
are available. I agree to release the Company and its agentsfrom any liability arising as a result
of my urine test or the rejection of my application for employment ortermination of my
employment as a result of a positive result of my urine test, even if such result proves tobe
inaccurate.
I have read and understand the Company’s Shipboard Drug &Alcohol Policy and hereby consent
to aurine test as described above.
_________________________________________
Signature Date (mm/dd/yyyy)
_________________________________________
Printed Name
Original should be signed in blue ink: Employee – to bring to the ship.
2 signed copies: 1 Hiring Partner – for File, 1 Hiring Partner – to send to RCCL Invoicing Clerk
Shipboard Drug and Alcohol Policy
The use of illegal drugs and alcohol abuse is a significant problem in today’s society. The effect
of illegal drug and alcohol abuse can poseserious safety problems to the Company and the
industry as a whole. Personal injury, accidents, damages to property, low morale, andsecurity
risks can potentially be a result of drug and alcohol abuse. Keeping our ships free from drug and
alcohol abuse is an important partof the safe operation of our ships.
Policy:
The objective of this policy is to provide candidates for shipboard employment and shipboard
employees with a fundamental knowledge ofwhat Royal Caribbean International and Celebrity
Cruises expects from its employees regarding the use of illegal drugs and alcohol abuse.Royal
Caribbean International and Celebrity Cruises support the efforts of the various government
agencies of the United States, Norway,the Bahamas, Liberia and other nations in their efforts to
reduce drug and alcohol abuse. The Company regularly assists US Customs, USCoast Guard, The
Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), and other local authorities to investigate suspected drug
smuggling operations,possession of controlled substances, and all illegal use of drugs on ships
that regularly call on US ports. The company also supports theefforts of other nations,
international organizations, and maritime regulators to combat drug and alcohol abuse.
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The Master may, at any time, request a search of the shipboard employee’s cabin and personal
effects. Shipboard employees are alsosubject to search upon entering or leaving the ship and at
any time by various local authorities.
• Every shipboard employee is required to understand this policy and is expected to adhere to
the policy while employees onboard aRoyal Caribbean International or Celebrity Cruises’ ship.
• No shipboard employee shall use, possess or sell illegal drugs. Such shipboard employees are
subject to criminal prosecution by localauthorities and/or the governing flag-state of the ship.
• No watch keeping employee, or any employee holding a position as described in the Safe
Manning Certificate, while on duty or eight(8) hours prior to the start of duty, may consume
alcohol, illegal drugs, intoxicating substances, or anaesthetizing substances.
• No off-duty shipboard employee shall have a blood alcohol content (BAC) above 0.08 percent.
• No on-duty shipboard employee shall have a blood alcohol content (BAC) above 0.04 percent.
• A shipboard employee found to have a concentration of alcohol in the blood greater than the
limits described above is considered inviolation of this policy and shall be relieved of duty
immediately and subject to disciplinary action up to and including termination ofemployment.
• Employees may enjoy alcoholic beverages including beer, wine and spirits in designated
employee lounges. Employees who arepermitted to socialize in designated areas may also
enjoy alcoholic beverages in public lounges.
Pre-Employment Screening:
Royal Caribbean International and Celebrity Cruises may require any candidate for shipboard
employment to be screened for drugs and/oralcohol in the employment process. All job offers
are contingent upon passing the Company’s Pre-Employment Medical Examination(PEME),
which may include the testing for drugs and/or alcohol. Candidates who refuse to be tested or
test positive based on establishedCompany guidelines, will not be considered for employment.
Post-Employment Testing:
The Company may require random testing of any shipboard employee. Such testing will be
carried out in compliance with internationally
Accepted procedures regarding collection and testing procedures, integrity and identity of
specimens, laboratory requirements, chain ofcustody, and review of results. Random testing of
shipboard employees will be done at the discretion of Human Resources. All othertesting
onboard requires the approval of the Master.
In case of accident or near accident the Company or regulatory enforcement agency may
require each shipboard employee that was directlyinvolved with the accident or near accident
to be tested for evidence of drug or alcohol use. The Master, with reasonable cause, may
alsorequire any shipboard employee to be tested for drugs or alcohol. Shipboard employees
who refuse to be tested or test positive based onestablished Company guidelines will be
relieved of duty immediately and are subject to disciplinary action up to and including
termination.
• Testing of shipboard employees onboard requires the approval of the Master. Testing is to be
done by one of the ship’s doctors, nurses,or an acknowledged testing laboratory official.
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• The shipboard employee being tested is entitled to choose a witness among the other
shipboard employees to accompany him/herduring the test procedure onboard. If a team
administers the test, appointment of a witness may not be necessary.
• Testing for potential alcohol abuse onboard will normally be done by use of a meter but other
means may be used.
• Testing for potential drug abuse will normally be done by urine test but a blood test may also
be used. Shipboard employees arerequired to provide blood specimens when directed to do so
by the Company or a regulatory enforcement official.
• All testing and medical records shall be kept strictly confidential.
Disciplinary Action:
Violation of this policy may result in disciplinary action up to and including termination of
employment.
Life Insurance Beneficiary Designation
The purpose of this form is to allow you to designate a beneficiary or beneficiaries for any
death benefitwhich may be payable from the RCCL Life Insurance Plan while you are signed on
the ship. If youwould like to change your beneficiary or if the defendant (under age 21) status
should change you mustcomplete and sign a new form.
Unique I.D. # ________________
Insured Person (Employee)
First Name: Last Name: Date of Birth (mm/dd/yyyy):
Street Address:Postal Code: State: Country:Telephone Number: E-Mail Address:
Primary Beneficiary: __________%
First Name: Last Name: Date of Birth (mm/dd/yyyy):
Street Address:Postal Code: State: Country:Telephone Number: E-Mail Address:
Contingent Beneficiary: __________%
First Name: Last Name: Date of Birth (mm/dd/yyyy):
Street Address:Postal Code: State: Country:Telephone Number: E-mail Address:
Please list below dependent children under 21 years of age:
Full Name: Date of Birth (mm/dd/yyyy):
Full Name: Date of Birth (mm/dd/yyyy):
Full Name: Date of Birth (mm/dd/yyyy):
Full Name: Date of Birth (mm/dd/yyyy):
Insured person’s signature: Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy):
Witness: Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy):
Original should be signed in blue ink: Hiring Partner – to send to RCCL Invoicing Clerk
2 signed copies: 1 for Hiring Partner – for File; 1 for Employee.
Step 3: Other Requirements
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Visa Requirements
Visa requirements for crew members depend on ship assignments, as they are itinerary driven.
Will immediately inform you what specific visa you need to secure once your assignment has
been confirmed. Please be reminded that the actual cost of the visa will only be reimbursed
once you join the ship – service charges or associated fees for obtaining the visa are not eligible
for reimbursement. Kindly bring the detailed original receipt and submit it to the Financial
Controller on your assigned ship to process your reimbursement.
About the C1/D visa
Unless you are citizen of the United States or Canada, you are required to obtain a C1/D visa if
you
Will be working on a ship that enters US waters. A C1/D visa is a non-immigrant visa for citizens
of
A foreign country who wish to enter the United States as a passenger to join an aircraft or a
vessel
Within US territory. Please get in touch with your local US Embassy or Consulate or
visithttp://www.usembassy.gov/ to get more specific information. The Embassy/Consulate will
provide
You with the appropriate filling forms, appointment date, and cost.
• If you are not scheduled to a ship sailing in US waters during your contract, you should
notattempt to obtain or renew a C1/D visa as you risk being denied. Anyone denied for a
C1/Dvisa will be deemed ineligible to join.
• If you already have a C1/D visa that will remain valid for more than one year,
Please send us a color copy.
IMPORTANT: Kindly verify with your coordinator if you are unsure whether your ship
assignment
Will be entering US waters.
Other countries have specific requirements for joining, as well, and we will do our best to
informyou of the documents you need to obtain. However, please be reminded that, ultimately,
it is your
Responsibility to know what documentation is required to get onboard your vessel.
You’re now closer to setting sail aboard one of our incredible ships!This part of your
preparations
Focuses on the travel requirements, identification documents, and training records.
Seaman’s Book
• Your coordinator will advise you if you are required to obtainthis document
• If required, please email us a copy of your seaman’s book,ensuring the file is named
accordingly:
SeamansBook_LastName_FirstName
Example: SeamansBook_Cruz_John.pdf
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Training Certificates
• Your coordinator will advise you if you are required to obtainany training certificates
prior to embarkation.
• If certificates are required, please ensure your files are named accordingly:
o TrainingCertificate STCW_LastName_FirstName
o TrainingCertificate SSA_LastName_FirstName
o Examples: TrainingCertificate STCW_Cruz_John.pdf
Please prepare the documents and submit them to your coordinator at your earliest
convenience. Remember that all documents must be completely clear and easy to read. All
documents must be supplied to us in pdf or jpg format.The file should be named according to
your document and last name, first name.
Example: Shipboard Drug and Alcohol Policy Form_Cruz_John.pdf
Letter of Employment
In most cases, you will need a Letter of Employment (LOE) in order to apply for a visa. Once you
are assigned to a ship, your LOE will be available on RCLCrewTravel.com
Please follow these steps to view/print your Letter of Employment:
1. Log-on to RCLCrewTravel.comand click "My Travel Details
2. Click on"Letter of Employment""
3. Click on the name of your shipto view the printable versionof your LOE
Step 4: Pre-Employment Medical Examination
Your preparations are almost done! However, before you join oneof our ships, we need to
make sure that you are fit for duty,so you can fully enjoy the rewarding experience of being an
RCLemployee.
To prove that you are physically ready to assume your role, you arerequired to undergo a PreEmployment Medical Examination (PEME)at a Company-approved medical facility, through
which you wouldreceive an RCL Medical Certificate for Service at Sea.
You will be responsible for all medical fees. Please log-on toRCLCrewTravel.com (more about
this in Step 6) to view the list ofmedical facilities approved by Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd.If no
Approved Medical Provider is listed in your country, you may usethe services of a
physician/clinic familiar with maritime or occupationalhealth medicals for your PEME/REME.
However, keep in mind that youmust send all completed medical forms and test results to
[email protected] final review and approval (this approval will be required for you to beallowed
to join the ship). Important: All documents must be received atleast 10 days before your joining
date.
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All medical records will be provided to you directly by the medical provider.You must bring all
original medical forms and results when you join yourship. Please note that you won’t be able
to board without a complete pre-employmentmedical. Once you have completed your PEME,
please emailONLY the RCL Medical Certificate for Service at Sea to your coordinator. Allother
documents will be ignored in accordance with our confidentialityprotocol.
Please submit your RCL Medical Certificate for Service at Sea to your coordinator at your
earliest convenience. Remember that itmust be completely clear and easy to read, and supplied
to us in pdf or jpg format. The file should be named according to yourdocument and last name,
first name. Example: MedFormA_Cruz_John.pdf
TIP: When visiting yourdoctor for your PEME,please make sure he/sheforms, including the vital
signsarea (at the top of Form B).
TIP: When joining theship, remember to bringwith you the originalmedical exam, including all
Test results (don’t forget tokeep a copy for your records!)
Step 5: Learning Made Simple
Now that you have completed all the requirements, it’s time to learn moreabout our company.
Once we have received your new hire forms, we’ll generate a unique employeeID for you and
you’ll start receiving some important automated messages,including an invitation to join our
Learning Made Simple (LMS) system.
Step 6: RCLCrewTravel.com
RCLCrewTravel is a travel portal designed to provide you with all the information you need to
have a smooth travel experience. Once you have submitted all the required information, you
will receive an email with your log in details.
Have a smartphone? Download the RCLCrewTravel app, available for Apple and Android
devices.
The email with your log in information will look like this:
Once you have your log-in credentials, go to RCLCrewTravel.com to log in.
Visit RCLCrewTravel.com for all your travel needs.
REMINDERS
Please keep your onboarding coordinator updated on your progress withthese steps. We expect
you’d be cleared to join your ship at least ten (10)days before your actual joining date, so
please keep in mind that thesesteps should be completed as quickly as possible to secure
youremployment.
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Any lack of communication or response when nearing your joining datecould jeopardize your
contract.
Please read through all attachments carefully, and do not hesitate tocontact your onboarding
coordinator if you have questions prior totravelling.
***Please be informed, your assignment date can be confirmed betweenone (1) to six (6)
months***
Thank you for your cooperation!
IMPORTANT: Once you have been approved for hire by our coordinator,DO NOT RESIGN from
your current position (if you are currently employed).You will be provided a Letter of
Employment (LOE) when an assignment hasbeen offered and accepted. After you receive the
LOE, you will then havetime to apply for appropriate visas, complete your medical exam,
andpurchase your airline ticket. Failure to secure any of these will prevent youfrom joining our
company. We strongly suggest you wait to resign from yourcurrent position until you have
obtained all necessary documentation.
TIP: While travellingto the ship, rememberto take the LOE withyou, as it may be requiredby
immigration officials. Formarine positions, please bringall professional licensesand certificates
as well.
T I P: When in transit, keepthis emergency travel numberwith you at all times:1-877-414-CREW
(2739)
We are looking forward toseeing you on board soon
Don’t forget to always log-in to RCLCrewTravel for updates.
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HOW TO APPLY
FOR CLEANER OR GALLEY UTILITY POSITION
ONBOARD
260
ROYAL CARIBBEAN CRUISE LTD.
Please visit https://myrclhome.com/main_login
Click on Are you a new applicant? Enter Here, you will be directed to below print screen; start
filling out the Create Account Form as shown below.
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After you have filled out the form above, you will be directed to below print screen and click
continue to apply.
Pop out will appear on your screen, just click No Thanks
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Again you will be directed to below print screen, but this time you have logged in to your
account.
Click on Housekeeping, then click on Cleaner as shown below print screen.
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New Screen will appear as shown below print screen; Click Apply Now
You will be directed to below print screen; fill out all items that need to be filled out. Scan all
documents that you have already processed, and uploaded to your account.
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BASIC SAFETY TRAINING
SAFETY EQUIPMENT ON BOARD
1. Safety of Life at Sea: The Convention
2. IMO Safety Signs
3. Safety On Board: Oral Commands
4. Location and Purpose of Safety Equipment
5. SOLAS requirements: Surviving Disaster
The STCW Convention
The key to maintaining a safe shipping environment and keeping our oceans clean lies in all seafarers
across the world observing high standards of competence and professionalism in the duties they
perform on-board. The International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and
Watchkeeping for Seafarers 1978, as amended in 1995 and again in 2010, sets those standards, governs
the award of certificates and controls watchkeeping arrangements . Its provisions not only apply to
seafarers, but also to ship-owners, training establishments and national maritime administrations.
The convention was adopted by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) in 1978 and came into
force in 1984. During the late 1980s, it was clear that STCW-78 was not achieving its aim of raising
professional standards worldwide, and so IMO members decided to amend it. This was done in the early
1990s, and the amended convention was then called STCW-95.
The 2010 Manila amendments was intended to include all agreed changes since 1995, address new
technology, inconsistencies, interpretations and outdated provisions. There was particular emphasis on
improving control and communication provisions of certification in Chapter 1 and addressing the specific
requirements of offshore and short sea shipping. There was also an overall commitment to harmonise
the amended STCW Convention, where practical, with the provisions of the 2006 ILO Maritime Labour
Convention
Whereas the STCW-78 Convention focused almost entirely on knowledge, the emphasis of STCW-95 has
been shifted to practical skills and competence underpinned by theoretical knowledge. The 2010
amendments continued to emphasis competence rather than sea service or period of training. The
standard set by the convention applies to seafarers of all ranks serving on sea-going merchant ships
registered under the flag of a country party to the convention.
The term “seagoing ships” includes all commercial vessels engaged on domestic or international
voyages. The STCW Convention does not apply to seafarers serving on warships, naval auxiliaries or any
other government owned or operated ship engaged in non-commercial service; fishing vessels (there is
a separate convention covering personnel on fishing vessels); pleasure yachts not engaged in trade and
wooden ships of primitive build.
The STCW (95) Convention has already been accepted by all major labour suppliers and shipping
registries. This is more than 98 per cent of the world’s merchant fleet. At the end of this guide you will
find a list of all countries that are parties to the current convention and the dates of acceptance but
does not indicate those who are implementing fully the 2010 amendments. Governments must submit
reports on their compliance to the IMO by 1 January 2013
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The following pictures show items related to Safety On Board, and particularly Safety Equipment On
Board. What is shown in each picture? Match the text to the pictures as a starting point to discuss in
class.
266
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Instructions on how to use survival craft
Personal Lifesaving Appliance approved by SOLAS – inflatable lifejacket
Where safety equipment is located on the bridge
Instructions on how to use a personal life-saving appliance
IMO Safety Signs
The most important convention protecting the safety of merchant vessels
A Code with a description and the technical requirements of appliances for saving lives in an
emergency on board.
1. Safety of Life at Sea: The Convention
I. SOLAS and The LSA Code
The IMO has a Maritime Safety Committee (MSC). It is a senior technical body which has developed and
adopted international collision regulations and global standards for seafarers as well as international
conventions and codes relating to search and rescue, the facilitation of international maritime traffic,
load lines, the carriage of dangerous goods, etc.
The most important of the international conventions dealing with maritime safety is the international
convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS 74, as amended) which covers a wide range of measures
designed to improve the safety of shipping. The convention in force today is referred to as “SOLAS,
1974, as amended”: it was adopted in 1974, entered into force in 1980, and has been updated and
amended on numerous occasions.
Chapter III of SOLAS contains the requirements of Life-Saving Appliances, the description of these
appliances and the description of procedures for emergency and routine drills. In 1996 the International
Life-Saving Appliance (LSA) Code was adopted to provide international standards for the testing and
technical characteristics of life-saving appliances required by Chapter III of the SOLAS convention. The
LSA Code entered into force in 1998. It gives more precise technical requirements for LSAs and is
mandatory under SOLAS Regulation 34, which states that “all life-saving appliances and arrangements
shall comply with the applicable requirements of the LSA Code”.
The following items are covered by the LSA code, write them under the correct heading:

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
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Liferafts
Lifeboats
Lifebuoys
Rescue boats
Immersion suits
Hand flares
Rocket parachute flares
Lifejackets
Smoke sig
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Personal life-saving
appliances
Survival Craft
Visual signals
II. Amendments to SOLAS 74 – The “Carriage of Immersion Suits” example
When reading about regulations and conventions, it is important to understand certain key words, such
as:
Amendment:
Requirement:
A change or addition to a convention a low, etc.
Something specified as compulsory
To give you an illustration of how amendments provide new requirements, read the following
statement, which contains a requirement, and try to decode it by answering the questions.
In accordance with SOLAS regulation III/32.3 (effective July 1, 2006) one
immersion suit per crew member is required on commercial vessels.
1. Imagine you are an inspector who wants to make sure that a merchant vessel operates under
SOLAS. What must you check?
2. Before July 2006, was it compulsory to have one immersion suit for each member of the crew on
board?
3. What do “III” and “32.3” refer to?
Read the following background information that explains the amendment behind the requirement, in
other words, how the new requirement came about.
In May 2004, the MSC adopted amendments to SOLAS chapter III Regulation 32 – Personal life-saving
appliances to make changes to the number of immersion suits to be carried on all cargo ships. The
amendments entered into force in 2006 and introduced carriage requirements for one immersion suit
per person on board all cargo ships, including bulk carriers. Before that, the regulation required carriage
of at least three immersion suits for each lifeboat on a cargo ship, as well as thermal protective aids
for persons not provided with immersion suits. With the 2006 amendments, immersion suits became, as
lifejackets, a personal life-saving appliance for each person on board, thus offering better thermal
protection and improved chance of survival and rescue.
Adopt
Facilitation
Amend
Enter into force
Require
Precise
Mandatory
Glossary
Formally accept or approve
The act of making easy or easier
To alter and improve formally by adding, deleting or rephrasing, to prepare a new
version of
Coming to have legal force and effect
To demand as obligatory or appropriate, oblige to do by force of authority, also, need or
call for
Exact, detailed, clearly expressed
Required by law, compulsory, obligatory
268
Comply with
Applicable
In accordance with
Thus
To follow (an agreement or instructions), meet specified standards, act in accordance
with a wish or command.
That can be applied, relevant or appropriate
In agreement with, it conformity with
In this way, so
a. Dates are another key item you need to be clear about in relation to conventions.
SOLAS
LSA Code
Adoption:
Entry into
force:
May-04
Amendment on Carriage
of Immersion Suits
1980
2. IMO Safety Signs
A. TICK ( √ ) THE CORRECT ALTERNATIVE.
1. What does this mean?
fasten seatbelts
start engine
secure hatches
release falls
2. What does this mean?
start power
start engine
secure sprinkler
release air supply
3. What does this mean?
4. What does this mean?
lower liferaft
lower lifeboat
lower rescue boat
lower liferaft
lower lifeboat
lower rescue boat
5. What does this mean?
6. What does this mean?
start engine
start air supply
secure hatches
release falls
secure hatches
fasten seatbelts
release falls
fasten lines
7. What does this mean?
lower liferaft
lower lifeboat
lower rescue boat
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B. WORK IN PAIRS. DISCUSS WHAT THE FOLLOWING SIGNS MEAN.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
Emergency Escape
Breathing Device
(EEBD) IMO sign
(f)
Immersion suit IMO
sign
Lifeboat IMO sign
Embarkation Ladder
IMO sign
Lifebuoy IMO sign
(g)
(h)
(i)
(j)
Lifebuoy with light
and smoke IMO sign
(k)
Lifebuoy with light
IMO sign
(l)
Lifebuoy with Line
IMO sign
(m)
Lifejacket IMO sign
Liferaft IMO sign
(n)
(o)
Medical locker IMO
sign
Rescue Boat IMO
sign
(q)
Survival-craft
distress signal IMO
sign
(s)
Fire extinguisher
sign
(p)
Search and Rescue
Transponder (SART)
IMO sign
(r)
Emergency ladder
Emergency shower
Anti exposure suit
Emergency stop
Child’s life jacket
(u)
(v)
(w)
(x)
(y)
Drinking water
Davit launched life
raft
Evacuation slide
Evacuation slide
Line throwing
appliance
(t)
270
(z)
(aa)
(bb)
(cc)
(dd)
Navigation guide
EPIRB
Permission to...
Rocket parachute
flares
Survival craft
portable radio
Stairway
(ee)
(ff)
(gg)
(hh)
(ii)
Lower life raft to
water
Lower lifeboat to
water
Lower rescue boat
to water
Meeting point
Radar transponder
C. IMO WARNING, MANDATORY AND PROHIBITION ACTION SAFETY SIGNS:
(1)
(2)
(3)
Accidents must be reported sign
(4)
Danger low oxygen level sign
(5)
Danger sign
(6)
No smoking sign
Restricted area no unauthorized
entry sign
This door to be kept locked in port
sign
D. ESCAPE ROUTE AND MUSTER STATION DIRECTIONAL SIGNS :
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
Meeting point
Emergency exit sign
Emergency exit sign
Emergency exit (left hand)
271
(5)
(6)
(7)
(8)
Safe condition directional
arrow sign - 45° angle
Safe condition directional
arrow sign
(9)
(10)
Muster Station sign with
directional arrow to the
right
(11)
Muster Station sign with
directional arrow to the
left
(12)
Exit sign (right hand side)
Exit sign (left hand side)
Evacuation route sign progress to the right
Evacuation route sign progress to the right
E. FIRE - FIGHTING EQUIPMENT SIGNS IN COMPLIANCE WITH ISO 24409, IMO signs:
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
5 Kg CO2 Fire extinguisher
sign
6 Kg Powder Fire
extinguisher sign
9 L Foam Fire extinguisher
sign
12 Kg Powder fire
extinguisher sign
(5)
(6)
(7)
(8)
Powder portable fire
extinguisher - 6Kg
Closing appliance for
exterior ventilation inlet
or outlet
Closing device for
ventilation inlet or outlet
for cargo spaces
(9)
(10)
Closing device for
ventilation inlet or outlet
for accommodation and
service spaces
(11)
(12)
272
Closing device for
ventilation inlet or outlet
for machinery spaces
(13)
Fire mains with fire valves
Hose box with spray jet
fire nozzle
Manually operated call
point
(14)
(15)
(16)
Section valves drenching
system
Space or group of spaces
monitored by heat
detector(s)
Space or group of spaces
monitored by smoke
detector(s)
Space protected by CO2
(17)
(18)
(19)
(20)
Water fire hose and nozzle
Fire extinguisher sign
Fire hose reel sign
Fire monitor sign
(21)
(22)
(23)
(24)
Fixed fire extinguishing
battery
Portable foam applicator
unit sign
Wheeled fire extinguisher
sign
Locker with ad ditional
breathing apparatus
(25)
(26)
(27)
(28)
A class fire door
A class self-closing fire
door
A class self-closing fire
door
Locker with fireman’s
outfit
(29)
(30)
(31)
(32)
273
Fire station 2
Fire alarm
Fire axe
Fire damper in vent duct
F. SAFETY AWARENESS AND TRAINING PROCEDURES
Davit launched liferafts - ISM safety
procedures
Free fall launching - ISM safety procedures
Life saving signals - ISM safety procedure
Liferaft launching - ISM safety procedures
274
Fire monitor sign
275
Davit
ABC POWDER
276
BC POWDER
277
LIFE RAFT
278
EPIRB
IMO parachute-flare
signals
Survival craft distress signal
Life rafts
Davit with Lifeboat
Life Jacket
279
ORAL COMMAND
1. Operate the general emergency alarm / fire alarm.
2. All officers to go / report to the bridge.
3. Watchkeepers remain at stations / locations until further order.
4. Take lifejackets / life rafts with you.
5. Take your emergency equipment with you according to the safety list / muster list.
6. Follow the safety routes / escape routes shown.
7. Do not go to the lifeboat stations / lifebuoy stations before ordered.
8. Provide first aid in the vessel’s office / hospital.
9. Watchkeepers to assembly / eye rinse stations.
10. Put on your emergency suits / immersion suits.
11. Passengers and crew! Follow the lifeboatmen to the lifeboat stations on the operation deck
/embarkation deck.
12. Throw overboard / onboard number 2 liferaft and report.
13. Salvage boat / Rescue boat! Assist number 2 liferaft and report.
14. Report the total number / whole number of persons in liferaft.
15. Fire rockets for embarkation / identification.
[checking status of equipment]
16. Check the lifeboat / liferaft equipment and report.
17. Launch / Release number two lifeboat and report.
18. Replace the liferaft in the next dock / port.
19. Secure the inflation cord / operation cord of number 2 liferaft.
[fire protection and fire fighting]
20. Check the transportable / portable extinguishers and report.
21. Fire on board! Fire fighting team must have protecting clothing, smoke helmets
and breathing apparatus / breathing mask.
22. Stand by / Retreat first aid team.
[SAR on-board activities]
23. Man overboard on port side. Drop lifeboat / lifebuoy.
24. Switch on searchlights / toplights.
25. Stand by life-saving apparatus / line-throwing apparatus and report.
URGENT COMMAND AND “MUST”
Look at the following commands:
Bring your lifejacket! Don’t use this fire extinguisher!
The commands are short.
We use the verb in the infinitive form.
We do not use I, you, he, she…
We stress the verb in the command:
Open the valve!
280
In the negative we stress both “don’t” and the main verb:
Don’t panic!
a). Match the halves to make full commands
1. Close...
2. Sound...
3. Go to...
4. Get...
5. Put on...
6. Don’t throw...
…the alarm!
…garbage overboard!
…the fire extinguisher!
…that valve!
…your assembly stations!
…your immersion suit!
b). Use the Verbs in the box to complete the sentences
Call
Get
Proceed
Lower
Not enter
Close
Stop
1. Fire in the galley! __________________ the fire blanket!
2. Man overboard! __________________ the rescue boat!
3. Emergency! __________________ to your muster station immediately!
4. Flooding in the engine room! __________________ the Master!
5. The oil is leaking! __________________ the pumps!
6. Fire in the accommodation! __________________ all fire doors!
7. The air is toxic! __________________ that area!
c) Samples of the emergency announcement’s commands:
1. Get the fire extinguisher!
2. Put out the fire!
3. Do not attempt to extinguish the fire!
4. Post two lookouts!
5. Sound the alarms immediately!
6. Lower the lifeboats!
7. Proceed to your muster stations immediately!
8. Prepare to abandon ship!
Look at the following sign:
You must record all garbage discharges in the garbage record book.
Must means (choose two):
a) it is very important to do something.
b) it is necessary to do something.
c) it is a good idea to do something.
Also, look at the following examples with must:
There is an oil spill on deck! You must close the valve immediately!
281
The oxygen level is low! You must not enter the enclosed space!
d). Circle the correct one.
1. You must / mustn’t throw plastic in the sea.
2. You must / mustn’t follow emergency procedures.
3. You must / mustn’t fasten your seat belt when you drive.
4. You must / mustn’t take notes during class.
5. You must / mustn’t speak loudly in hospitals
e). Fill in the blanks with "must" or "mustn't"
1. You __________________ smoke in the galley.
2. You __________________ make noise in the library.
3. You __________________ eat fruit and vegetables.
4. She is ill, so she __________________ see the doctor.
5. It is raining. You __________________ take your umbrella.
6. This is a secret. You __________________ tell anybody.
f). What fire fighting means must / must not be used when dealing with different types of fire? Use the
following table and write 5 sentences.
must
must not
water
foam
sand
dry powder
CO
2 (carbon dioxide)
inert gas
accommodation space fires
galley fires
cargo space fires
machinery space fires
oil fires
electrical fires
e.g. You mustn’t use water for electrical fires
1. ………………………………………………………………………………………………
2. ………………………………………………………………………………………………
3. ………………………………………………………………………………………………
4. ………………………………………………………………………………………………
5. ………………………………………………………………………………………………
282
HYPOTHERMIA
a). Read the following information from a Safety Manual. Fill in the missing sentences, which are given
below, to complete the stages of the procedure.
Hypothermia
Hypothermia occurs when the body temperature drops below 35°C/95°F. This can occur when the
casualty has been immersed in cold water for a length of time or is exposed to cold wind.
Here are some guidelines on the treatment of hypothermia:
1. Take the casualty to a protected area.
2. ____________________________________________________
3. Rewarm the casualty by wrapping them in a sheet, a thermal protection aid or by using the body heat
of another person. If the casualty is conscious, they can be rewarmed in a warm bath if they are able
to climb into the bath unaided.
4. ____________________________________________________
5. Look for signs of frostbite.
6. Monitor the casualty for breathing, pulse and temperature._________________
___________________________________________________________________
If casualty is fully conscious, give
them a warm drink.
GLOSSARY
Occurs
Immerse
Frostbite
Wrap
Unaided
Conscious
monitor
Resuscitate if necessary.
Remove any wet clothing and
replace with dry clothes
Happens, takes place
Dip or submerge in a liquid
Injury to body tissues caused by exposure to extreme cold, typically affecting the
nose, fingers or toes and often resulting in gangrene
Cover, enclose in
Without help, needing no assistance
Aware of and responding to your surroundings
Observe and check something over a period of time
b). Use the safety Manual information above and do the following orally.
1. Give some short commands.
e. g. Remove her clothes !
Wrap her with her blanket !
2. Say what you must or mustn’t do
e.g. You mustn’t keep the wet clothes.
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